The ESP Enigma: The Scientific Case for Psychic Phenomena [NOOK Book]

Overview


Dr. Diane Powell, a nationally prominent Johns Hopkins-trained neuropsychiatrist and former clinical instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, examines the evidence for many types of psychic phenomena, from telepathy and precognition to psychokinesis, and finds several well-designed and rigorously supervised studies that prove the existence of some psychic phenomena. This raises the important question: how is this possible? Proven ...
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The ESP Enigma: The Scientific Case for Psychic Phenomena

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Overview


Dr. Diane Powell, a nationally prominent Johns Hopkins-trained neuropsychiatrist and former clinical instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, examines the evidence for many types of psychic phenomena, from telepathy and precognition to psychokinesis, and finds several well-designed and rigorously supervised studies that prove the existence of some psychic phenomena. This raises the important question: how is this possible? Proven psychic phenomena don't fit into science's old model for the brain.

Dr. Powell proposes a revolutionary model of the brain and the mind. Consciousness may have properties similar to those of an energy field in physics. A field is defined as "a disturbance or condition in space that has the potential of producing a force," much the way a magnetic field polarizes iron filings into a predictable pattern around it. That and other aspects of her new paradigm for consciousness would explain how the mind of a mystic or psychic could have an organizational effect on the physical world.

Tests have shown that basically everyone has certain measurable psychic abilities-such as experiencing a psychic connection with a loved one-but the fact that psychic abilities are stronger among prodigies, autistic savants, some people who are bipolar or have suffered certain brain injuries has led to brain-imaging and other research that can explain which parts of the brain are dominant in psychics and mystics. The ESP Enigma is grounded in decades of reliable scientific research, establishing a common ground among psi believers and skeptics.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

In science it is axiomatic that extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Powell, a neuropsychiatrist who has taught at Harvard Medical School, certainly makes extraordinary claims about "the four basic psychic abilities": telepathy, psychokinesis, clairvoyance and precognition. But her evidence is consistently below par. She relies on self-reported claims by psychics, hundred-year-old newspaper accounts and the results of studies published by organizations like the Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research rather than in reputable, peer-reviewed scientific journals (and sometimes she cites no source at all). Powell is woefully short on mechanisms to explain the phenomena she claims are so common, although she does turn to quantum physics to assert that molecular resonance and the space-time continuum are likely responsible, and she finds evolutionary explanations for the existence of psychic phenomena. She claims, for instance, that psychic events are related to dreaming, which may have evolved so babies, who mostly sleep, can detect threats and communicate them psychically to their parents. Undaunted by the weak evidence, Powell asserts that she is on the forefront of a "Copernican revolution" of the mind. (Jan.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802719850
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 7/1/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 776,658
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 1.00 (d)
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Diane Hennacy Powell, M.D., completed her training in medicine, neurology, and psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She was on faculty at Harvard Medical School, before leaving academia for private practice. She is a member of a part-time think tank on consciousness at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California. She has published articles in neuroscience and neuropsychiatry journals. A former child prodigy in mathematics, Powell's article "We Are All Savants" was published in Shift, which is the quarterly journal of the Institute of Noetic Sciences (IONS). She also was the lead author of a special publication for IONS called The 2007 Shift Report.
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