×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

E.S.P.
     

E.S.P.

4.5 2
by Miles Davis
 

See All Formats & Editions

ESP marks the beginning of a revitalization for Miles Davis, as his second classic quintet -- saxophonist Wayne Shorter, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams -- gels, establishing what would become their signature adventurous hard bop. Miles

Overview

ESP marks the beginning of a revitalization for Miles Davis, as his second classic quintet -- saxophonist Wayne Shorter, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams -- gels, establishing what would become their signature adventurous hard bop. Miles had been moving toward this direction in the two years preceding the release of ESP and he had recorded with everyone outside of Shorter prior to this record, but his addition galvanizes the group, pushing them toward music that was recognizably bop but as adventurous as jazz's avant-garde. Outwardly, this music doesn't take as many risks as Coltrane or Ornette Coleman's recordings of the mid-'60s, but by borrowing some of the same theories -- a de-emphasis of composition in favor of sheer improvisation, elastic definitions of tonality -- they created a unique sound that came to define the very sound of modern jazz. Certainly, many musicians have returned to this group for inspiration, but their recordings remain fresh, because they exist at this fine dividing line between standard bop and avant. On ESP, they tilt a bit toward conventional hard bop (something that's apparent toward the end of the record), largely because this is their first effort, but the fact is, this difference between this album and hard bop from the early '60s is remarkable. This is exploratory music, whether it's rushing by in a flurry of notes or elegantly reclining in Hancock's calm yet complex chords. The compositions are brilliantly structured as well, encouraging such free-form exploration with their elliptical yet memorable themes. This quintet may have cut more adventurous records, but ESP remains one of their very best albums.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/13/1998
Label:
Imports
UPC:
0074646568323
catalogNumber:
5002879
Rank:
253835

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

E.S.P. 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is something directing these recordings, not someone. It¿s not just the colors, but how the artist mixes them. Some of the great allure to ESP and its follow up recordings employing the same quintet are in how the constructions are so well thought out while at the same time being treated with such available openness. 5 artists, in their own right, blend equally strong visions. Like different planets in revolution, each (in their own space and as important as the other) shows all sides. Miles¿ muted and bright sounds, Herbie¿s gesturing, Tony¿s phrasings, Wayne¿s burnished intonation, and Ron¿s steadfastness make the painting complete. Miles changes tones brilliantly and Shorter creates a prototype with unrestrained ability, putting together some successful ideas from previous dates and building on them while in some fantastic space here. Herbie Hancock finds himself somewhere between coloring and building textures, and Tony Williams uses the drums unlike anyone else, resulting in incredible range, sudden tempo changes, and extraordinary depth as latter expressed throughout MILES SMILES. Tony is the difference on these recordings. Ron Carter makes a great statement on ¿Eighty One¿ as the baseline becomes pivotal to the next chapter of Miles¿ funk movement and picked up again on IN A SILENT WAY. ESP is an honestly expressed title, connecting its past with something to come. Jeffrey Hayden Shurdut (jeffreyhshurdut@hotmail.com)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago