Esperanza renace (Esperanza Rising)

( 23 )

Overview

A Mexican "Grapes of Wrath," based on a family story, from the award-winning author of Riding Freedom.

Esperanza Ortega tiene todos los tesoros que una chica pueda desear: hermosos vestidos, una linda casa llena de sirvientes en México, y la promesa de que un día llegará a presidir el Rancho como su mamá. Pero una tragedia inesperada destruye ese sueño, obligando a Esperanza y a su madre a escapar a California dónde tendrán que trabajar en una finca junto a otros mexicanos. Allí...

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Overview

A Mexican "Grapes of Wrath," based on a family story, from the award-winning author of Riding Freedom.

Esperanza Ortega tiene todos los tesoros que una chica pueda desear: hermosos vestidos, una linda casa llena de sirvientes en México, y la promesa de que un día llegará a presidir el Rancho como su mamá. Pero una tragedia inesperada destruye ese sueño, obligando a Esperanza y a su madre a escapar a California dónde tendrán que trabajar en una finca junto a otros mexicanos. Allí tendrá que olvidar su pasado y enfrentarse a las nuevas realidades de su vida: trabajo duro, aceptación y dificultades económicas. Esperanza descubrirá que la verdadera riqueza está en la familia y la comunidad.

Esperanza and her mother are forced to leave their life of wealth and privilege in Mexico to go work in the labor camps of Southern California, where they must adapt to the harsh circumstances facing Mexican farm workers on the eve of the Great Depression.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This exciting, well-written historical novel is based on the true-life experiences of the author's grandmother, Esperanza Ortega. Thirteen-year-old Esperanza and her newly widowed mother are forced to leave their fairytale existence at beautiful Rancho de las Rosas in Mexico, to live and work in a migrant worker camp in the San Joaquin Valley during the Great Depression. Adjustments to her new life are difficult for Esperanza¾the harsh living conditions and hard labor are so different from her earlier life of privilege and wealth, especially after Mama becomes seriously ill with valley fever. But like the phoenix in her beloved grandma's story, Esperanza endures, "Rising again, with a new life ahead..." The author does a very good job of portraying the caring and solidarity, as well as the hardships, of Mexican-American labor camps of the era. An author's note is included. This book would be a great choice for a multicultural collection. 2000, Scholastic, $15.95. Ages 10 up. Reviewer: Gisela Jernigan
School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-Inspired by her grandmother's immigration stories, Pamela Mu-oz Ryan (Scholastic 2000) offers valuable glimpses of the lives of Mexican-American farm workers during the Depression. When her father dies, 13-year-old Esperanza and her mother are forced to abandon their privileged lives and move to California. At first the proud girl is appalled that they must share a cramped row house and work at menial jobs, but when her mother becomes gravely ill, she learns the value of generous friends and her own inner resources. This coming-of-age story also looks at the economic and social issues of that era, and the author's note adds valuable factual information. Trini Alvarado's narration is adroit and melodic as she handles text that skillfully intersperses Spanish phrases and songs. Pairing this story with Zilpha Keatley Snyder's Cat Running (Delacorte, 1994) will give listeners broader insights into the difficulties of the 1930's. This recording is a solid choice for all elementary and middle school audiobook collections, and a necessity for libraries serving Spanish-speaking populations.-Barbara Wysocki, Cora J. Belden Library, Rocky Hill, CT Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The author of Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride (1999) and Riding Freedom (1997) again approaches historical fiction, this time using her own grandmother as source material. In 1930, Esperanza lives a privileged life on a ranch in Aguascalientes, Mexico. But when her father dies, the post-Revolutionary culture and politics force her to leave with her mother for California. Now they are indebted to the family who previously worked for them, for securing them work on a farm in the San Joaquin valley. Esperanza balks at her new situation, but eventually becomes as accustomed to it as she was in her previous home, and comes to realize that she is still relatively privileged to be on a year-round farm with a strong community. She sees migrant workers forced from their jobs by families arriving from the Dust Bowl, and camps of strikers—many of them US citizens—deported in the "voluntary repatriation" that sent at least 450,000 Mexicans and Mexican-Americans back to Mexico in the early 1930s. Ryan's narrative has an epic tone, characters that develop little and predictably, and a romantic patina that often undercuts the harshness of her story. But her style is engaging, her characters appealing, and her story is one that—though a deep-rooted part of the history of California, the Depression, and thus the nation—is little heard in children's fiction. It bears telling to a wider audience. (author's note) (Fiction. 9-15)Sills, Leslie IN REAL LIFE: Six Women Photographers Holiday House (80 pp.) Oct. 15, 2000
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439398855
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/28/2002
  • Language: Spanish
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Spanish Language Edition
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 58,154
  • Age range: 8 - 15 Years
  • Lexile: 740L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.66 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Meet the Author


Pam Munoz Ryan is the recipient of the NEA's Human and Civil Rights Award and the Virginia Hamilton Literary Award for multicultural literature. She has written more than thirty books which have garnered, among countless accolades, the Pura Belpre Medal, the Jane Addams Award, and the Schneider Family Award. Pam lives near San Diego. You can visit her at www.pammunozryan.com.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 23 )
Rating Distribution

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(15)

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(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 26, 2012

    Esperanza is a multicultural novel which portrays the difficulti

    Esperanza is a multicultural novel which portrays the difficulties faced by migrant workers during the Great Depression. Pam Munoz Ryan is able to describe the plight of the migrant worker through beautiful descriptive language. In the story Esperanza, a privileged Mexican young woman is forced to move to America because of her fathers tragic death. Her ties to the land on which she was raised and her deep feeling for her family creative a fairy tale feel to the story. Esperanza rising is a beautiful and relatable story. Not only is it a journey from a cultural perspective but it is also a wonderful coming of age story. Children of all ages can enjoy Esperanza Rising.

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  • Posted October 8, 2012

    Hope for What Truly Matters in Life

    It's amazing how tragedy, turmoil and strife can effect change in one's outlook on life. This non-fiction novel tells the tale of a girl who "is the slowest in her family to make the transition from Mexican aristocracy to American working class". After the sudden tragedy of her father's death, Esperanza and her mother are forced to leave their ranch in Mexico and flee to California to try and make a living within a camp for Mexican farm workers. What proves most difficult for Esperanza is her struggle to adapt, but as the story unfolds she learns to let go of the life she previously had, without letting go of the love, memories, and traditions of those dearest to her. This book provides an insider perspective into the world of what it might have felt like living and working on a farm field during the trying times of the Depression. In fact, this book was inspired by the author's grandmother, who underwent similar experiences when she moved from Mexico to the United States. I couldn't help but empathize with Esperanza's story because the book paints a detailed picture of the hardships her family, as well as many other families, endured. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book and its emphasis on the importance of family, perseverance, and hope through both the good times and bad.

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  • Posted May 7, 2010

    Esperanza Rising in the Classroom.

    As an esl teacher ia am always looking for good reading materials for my junior high students. This book is stunning and I recommend it to all teachers. Both the English version and the Spanish version are fabulous. One of my students chose this book to read for a book report in her literature class and not only did she enjoy reading Esperanza rising but she received an A on his assignment. For the next school year I have decided to do a whole unit using this book. This book is a must for all school libraries, I know I will be adding it to my classroom library and donating a copy to the school library.

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  • Posted May 7, 2010

    Great for beginning to intermediate Spanish Reader

    This book is just right for beginner to intermediate Spanish reader. It is a story easy to absorb with family lessons about tolerance, love and living life to its fullest. Great for 7-9th grader.

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  • Posted March 4, 2010

    Esperanza Rising

    Esperanza Rising is an excellent book. It is sad in some parts but you will enjoy it mostly if you lke a lot of drama! This book shows how a wealthy girl, Esperanza Ortega, in Mexico turns into a poor child in California.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2008

    amazing

    This was a really good book. I recommend that people should read it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2007

    what was the favorit part?

    what was your favorit caracter? how did esperanza's dad die? did esperanza get together with miguel?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2007

    Amazing By Far

    This book knocked me off my feet. To be as Brave as that girl would be a miracle. 'No Wonder Esperanza Means Hope'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2006

    best book

    my personal favorite book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2006

    GREAT BOOK

    I thought it was a great book!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2006

    Excellent for family reading

    My daughter came home with this book so I decided to read it. I stayed up all night just to finish it! It reminded me of the stories I would hear from my own grandparents. Pam does an excellent job at portraying life and it's struggles back then but in a way that can be understood by kids. I read this book to my other children and they loved it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2006

    Esperanza, Queen of the Roses

    Esperanza Rising is a great, sad yet happy book filled with adventuresto new places, and maybe even an immigrant or two! This book tells about a young girl's adventure to new lands, going from rich to poor in a week, and making new friends all at once! As you read this book, think about how your life could be, like the life of this girl, Esperanza!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2005

    The OK Book

    Esperanza Rising was an ok book. I would definitely recommend it for a younger audience and it is a good book to read to a class. A part that I Didn't like was when Esperanzas Father gets killed and her life becomes a mess. It was sad. But overall it was an ok book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2005

    Esperanza Rising

    Esperanza Rising By Eric I loved the book called Esperanza Rising. But I also didn¿t like few things about Esperanza Rising. I¿m going to tell you what it¿s about and the age group who will enjoy it the most. First, Esperanza Rising is wonderful for all of the people that are interested in many things that are historical fiction. Also, for anyone who is interested about a life experience of an actual person in a story. Next everybody who likes a big change of something in a real life or a story should read this book. I suggest many people should read this book but I think that a specific population would really enjoy this book. This population would be 3, 4, 5 graders. Also, several middle school students who are serious and parents might like this book as well. There are parts in this book I criticize. First, the whole beginning and the middle of the story are very sad because Esperanza¿s papa died. Also, the whole story is serious and it¿s not like a fairytale, horror, adventure, fantasy, or comedy. If you enjoy historical fiction books that are sad and serious, then this is the book for you. So I told you many ideas and suggestions about this book. Also, if you fit the description, then you should read this book. Lastly, I hope you enjoy this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2002

    Undoubtably Descent

    Esperanza Rising had a neat way of weaving the Mexican culture and language into the book with out making it seem like a boring factual book.You can easily tell how much thought was put into this book. One gift of Pam Ryan is how she can put the reader in the book. I truly felt like I were there. None the less I must add that this book was very depressing though. It got a bit fustrating at times because her life just got worse and worse and worse.Sometimes I would asked myself why am I choosing to read this if it's just going to get more sad? In a wierd sort of way it was captivating though. The book is about a child and how at first she is a rich and pampered little mexican girl.Then everything goes downhill from there. After that after that at the end of the book it gets slightly happier. This book is extremely thouching too. So to sum it all up if your the type of person who likes culture, but doesn't mind a very depressing story than this would be a good book for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2002

    The Rising and Falling of Family Ties

    The book of Esperanza Rising is wonderful for young adults to learn that every family has their ups and downs, but not necessarily does it change the family structure of staying together. This book opens the doors for other cultures to see the practical life of Mexican-American and immigrants. This book helps translate words from Spanish to English. It is a very esay reading and full with history, nutrition and family ties.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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