An essay on the influence of authority in matters of opinion

An essay on the influence of authority in matters of opinion

by George Cornewall Lewis
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

An essay on the influence of authority in matters of opinion (1849).

This book, "An essay on the influence of authority in matters of opinion", by Lewis George Cornewall, is a replication of a book originally published before 1849. It has been restored by human beings, page by page, so that you may enjoy it in a form as close to the original as possible.

Overview

An essay on the influence of authority in matters of opinion (1849).

This book, "An essay on the influence of authority in matters of opinion", by Lewis George Cornewall, is a replication of a book originally published before 1849. It has been restored by human beings, page by page, so that you may enjoy it in a form as close to the original as possible.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940018650034
Publisher:
London : Longmans, Green
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
898 KB

Read an Excerpt


independently of our own conviction founded upon appropriate reasoning. When any one forms an opinion on a question either of speculation or practice, without any appropriate process of reasoning, really or apparently leading to that conclusion, and without compulsion or inducement of interest, but simply because some other persons, whom he believes to be competent judges on the matter, entertain that opinion, he is said to have formed his opinion upon authority. If he is convinced by a legitimate process of reasoning as by studying a scientific treatise on the subject his opinion does not rest upon authority. Or if he adopts any opinion, either sincerely or professedly, from motives of interest, or from fear of persecution, he does not found his opinion upon authority. He who believes upon authority, entertains the opinion simply because it is entertained by a person who appears to him likely to think correctly on the subject. Whenever, in the course of this Essay, I speak of the sunt leges, decreta senatus, responsa prudentum, res prseclare gestae, sententise clarorum virorum." See Cic. Top. c. xix. An auctor meant the originator or creator of anything. Hence Virgil speaks of the deified Augustus as " Auctorem frugum tem- pestatumque potentem," (Georg. i. 27;) and Sallust says that unequal glory attends " Scriptorem et auctorem rerum," (Cat. c. ii.) Hence any person who determines our belief, even as a witness, is called an auctor. Thus Tacitus, in quoting Julius Caesar as a witness with respect to the former state of the Gauls, calls him " Summus auctorum," (Germ. c. 28,) i. e., the highest of authorities. As writers, particularly of history, were the authorities for facts, "auctor" came to mean a writer. Hence Juvenal speaks of a preceptor of the Roman youth ...

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >