×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

An Essay on the Principle of Population
     

An Essay on the Principle of Population

by Thomas Malthus
 

See All Formats & Editions

This set provides a definitive scholarly variorum edition of Malthus' An Essay on the Principle of Population. The edition is based on the second edition of 1803, the work upon which Malthus' repuation as a population theorist and political economist was first built. It shows those parts of the work that incorporated the first edition of 1798, and gives all

Overview

This set provides a definitive scholarly variorum edition of Malthus' An Essay on the Principle of Population. The edition is based on the second edition of 1803, the work upon which Malthus' repuation as a population theorist and political economist was first built. It shows those parts of the work that incorporated the first edition of 1798, and gives all the variations introduced by Malthus in each of the subsequent editions (1806, 1807, 1817 and 1826). In addition to revealing the nature and extent of Malthus' changes, whether by expansion or excision, the edition reprints the important Appendices added in 1806 and 1817, giving answers to his critics. The work is introduced by the editor and contains a complete bibliography of all the authorities quoted by Malthus, together with extensive explanatory notes. Paricia James has previously edited Robert Malthus' travel diaries (1966) and written an authoritative biography of Malthus, Population Malthus: His Life and Times (1979).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781499750539
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
06/01/2014
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.13(d)

Meet the Author

The Reverend Thomas Robert Malthus FRS (13 February 1766 - 23 December 1834) was an English cleric and scholar, influential in the fields of political economy and demography. Malthus himself used only his middle name Robert.

Malthus became widely known for his theories about change in population. His An Essay on the Principle of Population observed that sooner or later population will be checked by famine and disease, leading to what is known as a Malthusian catastrophe. He wrote in opposition to the popular view in 18th-century Europe that saw society as improving and in principle as perfectible. He thought that the dangers of population growth precluded progress towards a utopian society: "The power of population is indefinitely greater than the power in the earth to produce subsistence for man". As a cleric, Malthus saw this situation as divinely imposed to teach virtuous behaviour.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews