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Essays and Reviews: Selected from the Princeton Review
     

Essays and Reviews: Selected from the Princeton Review

by Charles Hodge
 

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
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III. THE LATEST FORM OF INFIDELITY.1 Our readers are probably aware tbat the Unitarian clergymen of Boston and its vicinity, priding themselves in the name of liberal

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
III. THE LATEST FORM OF INFIDELITY.1 Our readers are probably aware tbat the Unitarian clergymen of Boston and its vicinity, priding themselves in the name of liberal Christians, have never professed to agree entirely among themselves in their doctrinal views. Of late, however, a portion of their number have advanced sentiments which, in the apprehension of the rest, exceed even the limits of the most liberal Christianity. Hence this Discourse on the Latest Form of Infidelity. The pamphlets before us do not enable us to ascertain precisely what this new form of infidelity is, nor how far it is embraced by the Boston clergy. We know, indeed, that it has its origin in German philosophy, and that the Rev. Mr. Emerson delivered an address before the same Association which listened to Mr. Norton's Discourse, which was a rhapsodical oration in favor of pantheism. We know also that that oration called forth an earnest remonstrance and disclaimer from some of the friends and officers of the Cambridge school of theology. The public papers moreover informed us that Mr. Emerson delivered, with some applause, a series of popular lectures on the new philosophy, to the good people of Boston. We are, however, ignorant both as to the number of those who embrace this new philosophy, and as to the extent to which they carry it. It may be inferred from Mr. Norton's discourse, that he considered hisopponents as denying either the possibility of a miracle, or the truth of the New Testament history in reference tothe miracles of Christ. Why else should he make the truth of the evangelical history, and the absolute necessity of a belief in miracles, in order to faith in Christianity, the burden of his discourse ? "The latest form of infidelity," he says, " is distinguished by assuming a Christian n...

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III. THE LATEST FORM OF INFIDELITY.1 Our readers are probably aware tbat the Unitarian clergymen of Boston and its vicinity, priding themselves in the name of liberal Christians, have never professed to agree entirely among themselves in their doctrinal views. Of late, however, a portion of their number have advanced sentiments which, in the apprehension of the rest, exceed even the limits of the most liberal Christianity. Hence this Discourse on the Latest Form of Infidelity. The pamphlets before us do not enable us to ascertain precisely what this new form of infidelity is, nor how far it is embraced by the Boston clergy. We know, indeed, that it has its origin in German philosophy, and that the Rev. Mr. Emerson delivered an address before the same Association which listened to Mr. Norton's Discourse, which was a rhapsodical oration in favor of pantheism. We know also that that oration called forth an earnest remonstrance and disclaimer from some of the friends and officers of the Cambridge school of theology. The public papers moreover informed us that Mr. Emerson delivered, with some applause, a series of popular lectures on the new philosophy, to the good people of Boston. We are, however, ignorant both as to the number of those who embrace this new philosophy, and as to the extent to which they carry it. It may be inferred from Mr. Norton's discourse, that he considered hisopponents as denying either the possibility of a miracle, or the truth of the New Testament history in reference to the miracles of Christ. Why else should he make the truth of the evangelical history, and the absolute necessity of a belief in miracles, in order to faith in Christianity, the burden of hisdiscourse ? "The latest form of infidelity," he says, " is distinguished by assuming a Christian n...

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