Essential ASP.NET 2.0 [NOOK Book]

Overview

"No one knows ASP.NET like Fritz Onion. And no one knows .NET security like Keith Brown. Combine the two and what do you get? The most comprehensive and enlightening book on ASP.NET 2.0 industrywide. I'm sure you'll find the book you're holding was worth every penny."

--Aaron Skonnard, member of technical staff and cofounder, Pluralsight

" Essential ASP.NET 2.0 gets under the hood and dismantles the engine before your eyes. Fritz and Keith understand that we as developers need ...

See more details below
Essential ASP.NET 2.0

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$25.49
BN.com price
(Save 42%)$43.99 List Price

Overview

"No one knows ASP.NET like Fritz Onion. And no one knows .NET security like Keith Brown. Combine the two and what do you get? The most comprehensive and enlightening book on ASP.NET 2.0 industrywide. I'm sure you'll find the book you're holding was worth every penny."

--Aaron Skonnard, member of technical staff and cofounder, Pluralsight

" Essential ASP.NET 2.0 gets under the hood and dismantles the engine before your eyes. Fritz and Keith understand that we as developers need to understand how it works and this book does exactly that. Their explanation of the ASP.NET 2.0 page event sequence is worth the price of the book alone."

--Shawn Wildermuth, Microsoft MVP (C#), "The ADO Guy"

" Essential ASP.NET 2.0 is an incredibly useful must-read for any developer.Many books drag you through theory and mindless detail, but this one actually sets up the problems you may encounter with ASP.NET 2.0 and rolls out the alternatives."

--Patrick Hynds, Microsoft Regional Director and President, CriticalSites

"This book is essential for any ASP.NET developer moving from version 1.x to 2.0. Onion and Brown not only cover the new features, but provide a wealth of insight and detail about how to use them effectively."

--Ron Petrusha, author of Visual Basic 2005: The Complete Reference

"Drawing on their deep technical knowledge and real-world experience, Fritz and Keith take the reader into some of the less explored and much improved areas of ASP.NET such as diagnostics and state management and performance. Readers will turn to this book over and over again."

--John Timney, Microsoft MVP, Senior Web Services Consultant,British Telecom

"Fritz and Keith, both established developers and writers in our industry, have succeeded again--enlightening us on the latest advancements found in ASP.NET 2.0. If you're new to ASP.NET or a seasoned veteran, you'll benefit tremendously from their overview, analysis, and sample code."

--Joe "MSJoe" Flanigen

"This book seeks not only to explain how to effectively build Web sites with ASP.NET, it also gives the reader an idea of how the process works. This insight is essential to creating applications that work with the infrastructure rather than fighting it."

--Justin Burtch, Vice President, Newbrook Solutions

Essential ASP.NET 2.0 is the Microsoft developer's definitive reference for ASP.NET 2.0 programming. It covers all you need to know to build robust, well-designed Web applications with ASP.NET 2.0, Visual Studio 2005, and .NET 2.0. ASP.NET MVP Fritz Onion and Developer Security MVP Keith Brown draw on their unparalleled experience working with ASP.NET 2.0 and teaching it to professional developers. From data binding to security, UIs to performance, they demystify ASP.NET 2.0's most difficult areas, and introduce little-known techniques for leveraging it to the fullest.

The perfect companion to his previous classic, Essential ASP.NET with Examples in C#, Essential ASP.NET 2.0 offers hundreds of new C# examples that illuminate today's best Web development practices. (Both C# and VB 2005 versions of all code examples can be downloaded from the companion Web site.)

Topics explored in-depth include:

  • Application architecture
  • Code behind
  • Master pages
  • Themes and skins
  • Navigation controls
  • Data binding
  • State management
  • Security
  • Web Parts
  • Diagnostics
  • Performance optimization
  • Asynchronous tasks and pages

Simply put, if you want to design and build better ASP.NET 2.0 Web applications, Essential ASP.NET 2.0 delivers everything you need: insider's knowledge, proven best practices, and outstanding code samples.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132701570
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 11/13/2006
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 416
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Fritz Onion is cofounder of Microsoft .NET training provider Pluralsight, and author of Pluralsight's ASP.NET curriculum. He teaches ASP.NET development worldwide. The author of the highly acclaimed Essential ASP.NET with Examples in C# (Addison-Wesley), Onion is a columnist for MSDN Magazine, and a regular speaker at TechEd, VSLive!, and PDC.

Keith Brown is cofounder of Pluralsight and contributing editor for MSDN Magazine. He is the author of Programming Windows Security and The .NET Developer's Guide to Windows Security, both from Addison-Wesley.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

I remember sitting in a room on the Microsoft campus in August of 2003 listening to Scott Guthrie and others from the ASP.NET team present the wide array of new features coming in ASP.NET 2.0. They astounded us with one demo after another of features that greatly simplified Web development, and in such a pluggable and extensible fashion so that changes could be made at any level as needed during the development process. As with its predecessor, I knew that this release was going to change the way developers built Web applications, and it would be compelling enough to bring many more developers to the ASP.NET platform.Over the subsequent two years I carefully tracked the Beta releases of ASP.NET 2.0, wrote many articles on the upcoming features, and gave numerous conference talks around the world. In early 2005 I finished writing Pluralsight's Applied ASP.NET 2.0 course, and spent the next year and a half teaching the course, as well as speaking, blogging, and writing about ASP.NET 2.0 in many different forums. This book is the culmination of those activities, and I hope it helps you in your path to understanding ASP.NET 2.0. Sample Code, Web Site, Feedback

All of the code samples in this book are drawn from working samples available for display and download at http://pluralsight.com/essentialasp.net2/. The site also contains examples written in VB.NET and a listing of all links and references mentioned in the book. Any errata found after publication will be posted on this site, as well as a supplemental set of more extended examples of the concepts presented in this book for your reference. The authors welcome your comments, errata, and feedback via the forms availableon the Web site. Volume 2, Not Second Edition

This book is fundamentally a companion book to my first book on ASP.NET, Essential ASP.NET with Examples in C#, and is not a second edition. You will notice little to no overlap between the two books, and, in fact, I strongly encourage you to become comfortable with much of the contents of the first book before jumping into this one. Almost all of the topics presented in the first book are still completely relevant today in the ASP.NET 2.0 release. There are, however, a few topics that can be bypassed in the first book as they have been replaced and/or modified with the ASP.NET 2.0 release. The following is a reader's guide to Essential ASP.NET with Examples in C# with the intent of preparing you to read this new book.Chapter 1—Architecture

The discussion of codebehind should be read only lightly, as it has changed in 2.0, although the ASP.NET 1.1 model of codebehind is still supported.Chapter 2—WebForms

The discussion of codebehind and server-side control integration can be skipped, as this has changed in ASP.NET 2.0. The last section on building WebForms with Visual Studio can be skipped.Chapter 3—Configuration

All of this chapter is still completely relevant. Do note that every use of ConfigurationSettings should now be ConfigurationManager in ASP.NET 2.0. Chapter 4—HTTP Pipeline

The discussion of asynchronous handlers can be skipped in anticipation of the entire chapter dedicated to asynchrony (Chapter 9) in this new book. Chapter 5—Diagnostics and Error Handling

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0.Chapter 6—Validation

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0. Be aware that client-side validation now works cross-browser (not just in Internet Explorer as it did in ASP.NET 1.1). Also, there is a new ValidationGroup property you can associate with validation controls and buttons that generate postbacks to selectively fire subsets of validation controls.Chapter 7—Data Binding

Skip over the discussion of the DataGrid control, as it has been replaced by the GridView control in ASP.NET 2.0. In the template discussion, replace every occurrence of DataBinder.Eval(Container.DataItem, ) with Eval(), which is the new expression in ASP.NET 2.0.Chapter 8—Custom Controls

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0. Whenever you see references to RegisterClientScriptBlock, replace it with ClientScript.RegisterClientScriptBlock for ASP.NET 2.0. In the discussion of data-bound and composite controls, be aware that there are two new control base classes in ASP.NET 2.0, DataBoundControl and CompositeControl, which should be used as base classes when creating these types of controls. There are also many new designer integration features in ASP.NET 2.0.Chapter 9—Caching

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0.Chapter 10—State Management

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0. Chapter 11—Security

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0. Be aware that many of the features discussed in the forms authentication section are much easier to build in ASP.NET 2.0 because of the membership feature. Understanding the details of how Forms authentication works is still critical to using membership properly, however, and thus this discussion is a good precursor to the discussion about security in Chapter 5 of this new book.Organization of This Book

Chapter 1, Architecture, covers the changes in the architecture of ASP.NET with this release, including a new codebehind mechanism, new Page events, new specially named compilation directories, a new compiler utility, and Web Application Projects.

Chapter 2, User Interface Elements, looks at the three primary new user interface elements of ASP.NET 2.0: master pages, themes and skins, and navigation controls. This chapter also looks at the new control adapter architecture as a means of altering standard control rendering in a browser-contingent way.

Chapter 3, Data Binding, describes the new declarative data source model introduced with ASP.NET 2.0. It starts with a discussion of the fundamentals of declarative data sources and moves through many different usages, including SQL, stored procedures, and objects.

Chapter 4, State Management, describes three new state-related features of ASP.NET 2.0, including cross-page posting, profile, and the MultiView, View, and Wizard controls.

Chapter 5, Security, covers the new security features in ASP.NET 2.0 with a special focus on the provider model. It includes lots of practical advice on choosing and configuring Membership and Role providers. It also covers the new login controls and other new features, such as cookieless forms authentication and configuration file encryption.

Chapter 6, Web Parts, describes the collection of components and controls introduced in ASP.NET 2.0 for constructing customizable portal sites. These components manage the details of storing user customization data, providing the interface for customization, and managing the Web Parts you define as components for users to work with.

Chapter 7, Diagnostics, explores management, instrumentation, and diagnostics in ASP.NET 2.0, focusing on the new health monitoring system. The key abstraction here is the Web event, and this chapter introduces the built-in events and providers as well as helps you build your own. At the end of the chapter is an introduction to ASP.NET 2.0 support for Event Tracing for Windows (ETW), showing how you can diagnose problems in a running ASP.NET application without having to attach a debugger.

Chapter 8, Performance, covers the new performance-related features of ASP.NET 2.0, including many new caching features as well as a client-callback architecture. Among the new caching features covered are data source caching, SQL cache dependencies, post-cache substitution, and configuration file settings for cache control.

Chapter 9, Asynchrony, looks at the new Async="true" attribute on the @Page directive in ASP.NET 2.0, and how it can be used to improve the responsiveness of pages in your site as well as increase the overall scalability of the application. Several ways of introducing asynchrony into your pages are covered, including implicitly using the AsyncOperationManager, explicitly using asynchronous tasks, and at a lower level by using the Page class's AddOnPreRenderCompleteAsync method.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Figures xv List of Tables xix Foreword xxi Preface xxiii Acknowledgments xxix About the Authors xxxi Chapter 1 Architecture 1

Fundamentals 2

Dynamic Content 2

Server-Side Controls 5

Data Binding 8

Codebehind 9

Codebehind Basics 9

Codebehind 2.0 11

Page Lifecycle 15

Common Events 15

New Events 17

Implicit Event Subscription 18

Compilation 20

Compilation Directories 20

Site Compilation 24

Assembly Generation 26

Customizing Assembly Generation 28

Web Application Projects 28

Summary 30

Chapter 2 User Interface Elements 33

Page Templates 33

Master Pages 35

Implementation Details 37

Working with Master Pages 41

Details of Usage 45

Themes and Skins 48

Themes 49

Working with Themes 51

Fundamentals of Navigation Controls 54

Control Adapters 58

Building Control Adapters 58

Browser Recognition 64

CSS Friendly Adapters 66

Summary 66

Chapter 3 Data Binding 67

Declarative Data Binding 68

Data Binding 68

Data Source Controls 70

Storing Connection Strings 82

Data Source Parameters 83

New Data-Bound Controls 87

Data-Binding Evaluation Syntax 91

Declarative Data-Binding Techniques 91

Hierarchical Data Binding 96

Binding to Objects 102

Typed DataSets 112

Summary 112

Chapter 4 State Management 113

Cross-Page Posting 114

Fundamentals 114

Implementation 120

Caveats 121

Multi-Source Cross-Page Posting 124

Wizard and MultiView Controls 127

Same Page State Management 127

Wizard Control 128

MultiView and View Controls 131

Profile 133

Fundamentals 133

Migrating Anonymous Profile Data 137

Managing Profile Data 138

Storing Profile Data 138

Serialization 139

User-Defined Types as Profile Properties 142

Optimizing Profile 143

Going the Custom Route 147

Summary 149

Chapter 5 Security 151

How Much Security Do I Need? 151

Getting Started with Membership 153

Provider Architecture 158

MembershipProvider 160

The Login Control 162

User Account Lockout: Blessing or Curse? 164

Password Complexity Policy 166

Choosing a Password Format 167

Password Questions and Answers 169

Configuring a Membership Provider 170

Custom Providers 172

Using the Membership Class to Access Your Provider 173

SQL Database Permissions 175

The LoginView and Other Controls 177

The Role Manager 180

Configuring the Role Manager and Provider 181

Other Role Providers 183

A Word about Machine Keys 184

Cookieless Forms Authentication 185

SiteMapProvider Security Trimming 187

Configuration File Encryption 188

Summary 191

Chapter 6 Web Parts 193

Web Part Fundamentals 194

Portal Components 194

Building a Minimal Portal Page 195

Display Mode 201

Catalog Parts and Zones 204

Properties 206

Editor Parts and Zones 210

Verbs 211

Connections 214

Personalization Scope 218

Exporting and Importing Web Parts 220

Formatting Web Parts and Zones 225

User Controls as Web Parts 226

Personalization Data and Providers 231

Changing the Personalization Data Store 233

Creating Your Own Personalization Provider 235

Summary 239

Chapter 7 Diagnostics 241

Health Monitoring and Web Events 241

Web Event Hierarchy 242

Which Events Should I Monitor? 245

Built-in Providers 245

The E-Mail Providers 248

The SQL Provider 251

Buffering 252

Registering for Events 254

Throttling and Profiles 256

Mapping the Health Monitoring Configuration Section 258

Custom Web Events 258

Custom Providers 261

Tracing in ASP.NET 2.0 264

Programmatic Access to Trace Output 264

Integration with System.Diagnostics Tracing 266

Funneling Web Events to System.Diagnostics Trace Listeners 268

Event Tracing for Windows: Debugging Without a Debugger 269

Summary 277

Chapter 8 Performance 279

Caching 279

Data Source Caching 280

Cache Dependencies 284

Programmatic Fragment Caching 296

Post-Cache Substitution 298

Cache Profiles 300

General Performance Enhancements 302

Client Callbacks 302

Client Callback Framework 302

On-Demand TreeView Node Population 306

Atlas 307

Summary 308

Chapter 9 Asynchrony 309

The Need for Asynchrony 310

Exploiting Parallelism 310

Relaxing Thread-Pool Contention 316

Techniques for Issuing Asynchronous Tasks 317

Asynchronous Web Access 317

AsyncOperationManager and Asynchronous Web Service Calls 320

Asynchronous Tasks 321

Dependent Asynchronous Tasks 324

Asynchronous Pages 326

Async="true" 326

Relaxing Thread-Pool Pressure 328

AddOnPreRenderCompleteAsync 329

Thread-Relative Resources 330

Summary 330

Index 333

Read More Show Less

Preface

I remember sitting in a room on the Microsoft campus in August of 2003 listening to Scott Guthrie and others from the ASP.NET team present the wide array of new features coming in ASP.NET 2.0. They astounded us with one demo after another of features that greatly simplified Web development, and in such a pluggable and extensible fashion so that changes could be made at any level as needed during the development process. As with its predecessor, I knew that this release was going to change the way developers built Web applications, and it would be compelling enough to bring many more developers to the ASP.NET platform.Over the subsequent two years I carefully tracked the Beta releases of ASP.NET 2.0, wrote many articles on the upcoming features, and gave numerous conference talks around the world. In early 2005 I finished writing Pluralsight's Applied ASP.NET 2.0 course, and spent the next year and a half teaching the course, as well as speaking, blogging, and writing about ASP.NET 2.0 in many different forums. This book is the culmination of those activities, and I hope it helps you in your path to understanding ASP.NET 2.0.

Sample Code, Web Site, Feedback

All of the code samples in this book are drawn from working samples available for display and download at http://pluralsight.com/essentialasp.net2/. The site also contains examples written in VB.NET and a listing of all links and references mentioned in the book. Any errata found after publication will be posted on this site, as well as a supplemental set of more extended examples of the concepts presented in this book for your reference. The authors welcome your comments, errata, and feedback via the forms available on the Web site.

Volume 2, Not Second Edition

This book is fundamentally a companion book to my first book on ASP.NET, Essential ASP.NET with Examples in C#, and is not a second edition. You will notice little to no overlap between the two books, and, in fact, I strongly encourage you to become comfortable with much of the contents of the first book before jumping into this one. Almost all of the topics presented in the first book are still completely relevant today in the ASP.NET 2.0 release. There are, however, a few topics that can be bypassed in the first book as they have been replaced and/or modified with the ASP.NET 2.0 release. The following is a reader's guide to Essential ASP.NET with Examples in C# with the intent of preparing you to read this new book.

Chapter 1--Architecture

The discussion of codebehind should be read only lightly, as it has changed in 2.0, although the ASP.NET 1.1 model of codebehind is still supported.

Chapter 2--WebForms

The discussion of codebehind and server-side control integration can be skipped, as this has changed in ASP.NET 2.0. The last section on building WebForms with Visual Studio can be skipped.

Chapter 3--Configuration

All of this chapter is still completely relevant. Do note that every use of ConfigurationSettings should now be ConfigurationManager in ASP.NET 2.0.

Chapter 4--HTTP Pipeline

The discussion of asynchronous handlers can be skipped in anticipation of the entire chapter dedicated to asynchrony (Chapter 9) in this new book.

Chapter 5--Diagnostics and Error Handling

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0.

Chapter 6--Validation

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0. Be aware that client-side validation now works cross-browser (not just in Internet Explorer as it did in ASP.NET 1.1). Also, there is a new ValidationGroup property you can associate with validation controls and buttons that generate postbacks to selectively fire subsets of validation controls.

Chapter 7--Data Binding

Skip over the discussion of the DataGrid control, as it has been replaced by the GridView control in ASP.NET 2.0. In the template discussion, replace every occurrence of DataBinder.Eval(Container.DataItem, ) with Eval(), which is the new expression in ASP.NET 2.0.

Chapter 8--Custom Controls

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0. Whenever you see references to RegisterClientScriptBlock, replace it with ClientScript.RegisterClientScriptBlock for ASP.NET 2.0. In the discussion of data-bound and composite controls, be aware that there are two new control base classes in ASP.NET 2.0, DataBoundControl and CompositeControl, which should be used as base classes when creating these types of controls. There are also many new designer integration features in ASP.NET 2.0.

Chapter 9--Caching

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0.

Chapter 10--State Management

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0.

Chapter 11--Security

All of this chapter is still completely relevant in ASP.NET 2.0. Be aware that many of the features discussed in the forms authentication section are much easier to build in ASP.NET 2.0 because of the membership feature. Understanding the details of how Forms authentication works is still critical to using membership properly, however, and thus this discussion is a good precursor to the discussion about security in Chapter 5 of this new book.

Organization of This Book

Chapter 1, Architecture, covers the changes in the architecture of ASP.NET with this release, including a new codebehind mechanism, new Page events, new specially named compilation directories, a new compiler utility, and Web Application Projects.

Chapter 2, User Interface Elements, looks at the three primary new user interface elements of ASP.NET 2.0: master pages, themes and skins, and navigation controls. This chapter also looks at the new control adapter architecture as a means of altering standard control rendering in a browser-contingent way.

Chapter 3, Data Binding, describes the new declarative data source model introduced with ASP.NET 2.0. It starts with a discussion of the fundamentals of declarative data sources and moves through many different usages, including SQL, stored procedures, and objects.

Chapter 4, State Management, describes three new state-related features of ASP.NET 2.0, including cross-page posting, profile, and the MultiView, View, and Wizard controls.

Chapter 5, Security, covers the new security features in ASP.NET 2.0 with a special focus on the provider model. It includes lots of practical advice on choosing and configuring Membership and Role providers. It also covers the new login controls and other new features, such as cookieless forms authentication and configuration file encryption.

Chapter 6, Web Parts, describes the collection of components and controls introduced in ASP.NET 2.0 for constructing customizable portal sites. These components manage the details of storing user customization data, providing the interface for customization, and managing the Web Parts you define as components for users to work with.

Chapter 7, Diagnostics, explores management, instrumentation, and diagnostics in ASP.NET 2.0, focusing on the new health monitoring system. The key abstraction here is the Web event, and this chapter introduces the built-in events and providers as well as helps you build your own. At the end of the chapter is an introduction to ASP.NET 2.0 support for Event Tracing for Windows (ETW), showing how you can diagnose problems in a running ASP.NET application without having to attach a debugger.

Chapter 8, Performance, covers the new performance-related features of ASP.NET 2.0, including many new caching features as well as a client-callback architecture. Among the new caching features covered are data source caching, SQL cache dependencies, post-cache substitution, and configuration file settings for cache control.

Chapter 9, Asynchrony, looks at the new Async="true" attribute on the @Page directive in ASP.NET 2.0, and how it can be used to improve the responsiveness of pages in your site as well as increase the overall scalability of the application. Several ways of introducing asynchrony into your pages are covered, including implicitly using the AsyncOperationManager, explicitly using asynchronous tasks, and at a lower level by using the Page class's AddOnPreRenderCompleteAsync method.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2006

    Web Parts and zones are nice

    Hmm, the Foreword says the MySpace web pages are written in ASP.NET. One of the most heavily trafficked web sites in the world. An impressive paean to ASP, and no doubt the authors cite this to reassure any questioning readers about how ASP can scale up almost arbitrarily. Most of the book seems dedicated to explaining the salient usages in the new version 2. Where these exist with an eye to improving the design of dynamic pages. Of the new features, Web Parts could be the most useful to some programmers. An extension of the SharePoint Services released in 2003. They are souped up UI widgets, for the making of portals. What Microsoft did was try to factor out the most common needs of many portals, and implement these for you, as much as possible. The Parts can still be modified by the programmer. But simply having them can save a lot of coding. Which reduces coding time and improves robustness. Another nice aspect associated with Web Parts is the idea of a zone. This lets you demarcate a page into non-overlapping rectangular regions. In each, you can then separately lay out a set of Parts. Much more powerful than the default HTML layout abilities. Or, indeed, what Java gives you with its default Layout Managers, that JSP programmers might have to use. As a Java programmer myself, I have often found its Layout Managers to be frustratingly too limited a view shared by many other programmers. Zones are a big improvement.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)