Essential CVS

Essential CVS

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by Jennifer Vesperman
     
 

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CVS, the Concurrent Versions System, is the popular source-code management tool that frees developers from the chaos that too often ensues when multiple users work on the same file. An open source technology that is available on most computer platforms, including Windows® and Mac OS® X, CVS is widely used to manage program code, web site content, and to track

Overview

CVS, the Concurrent Versions System, is the popular source-code management tool that frees developers from the chaos that too often ensues when multiple users work on the same file. An open source technology that is available on most computer platforms, including Windows® and Mac OS® X, CVS is widely used to manage program code, web site content, and to track changes made to system configuration files. Multiple users can check out files from a directory tree, make changes, and then commit those changes back into the directory.

If two developers modify the same file, CVS enables both sets of changes to be merged together into one final file. Although CVS is a lifesaver in many development scenarios, it suffers from poor documentation. But with Essential CVS, developers can have it all: the order that CVS brings and the comprehensive documentation developers need.

Essential CVS is a complete and easy-to-follow reference that helps programmers and system administrators apply order to the task of managing large quantities of documents. The book covers basic concepts and usage of CVS, and features a comprehensive reference for CVS commands--including a handy Command Reference Card for quick, on-the-job checks. The book also includes advanced information on all aspects of CVS that involve automation, logging, branching and merging, and "watches." Readers will find in-depth coverage of:

  • Installing CVS and building your first repository
  • Basic use of CVS, including importing projects, checking out projects, committing changes, and updating projects
  • Tagging, branching and merging
  • Working with multiple users
  • Clients, operating systems, and IDEs
  • Repository management and managing remote repositories
  • Project administration, including bug tracking systems, enforcing log messages, history and annotation, and more.
  • Troubleshooting

Version control is essential to maintaining order in any project, large or small. Any CVS user, from beginners to team leaders and system administrators, will find this practical guide to CVS indispensable in getting the most from this valuable tool.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
The Barnes & Noble Review
Every programmer needs a source control system, and every programmer’s got one: CVS. It’s omnipresent in UNIX/Linux environments, available with GUI flavoring for Windows and Mac, and can be integrated with development environments ranging from Eclipse to CodeWarrior. Sure, the documentation can be dicey, but for that, you’ve got Essential CVS by Jennifer Vesperman.

Vesperman, who’s been writing about CVS at O’Reilly.com for years, has assembled an exceptionally clear and accessible CVS tutorial. Her one-chapter “quick start guide” covers all you need to know to get rolling: installing and building CVS from source, or with apt, rpm, or yast; building repositories and importing projects into them; access existing repositories; checking out files; working with temporary “sandboxes,” and committing changes.

You’ll find detailed coverage of tagging and branching, including techniques you can use to fix bugs in older versions without changing current code, or modify configuration sets for staging servers without modifying production servers. Next, you’ll learn how to use CVS in environments with multiple users -- including reserving files, displaying recent changes and file histories, and more.

The book’s thorough coverage on CVS administration includes a detailed chapter on repository management, structure, and backups; another on using CVS as a project management tool; and yet another on working with remote repositories. Vesperman presents dozens of troubleshooting techniques, covering everything from connectivity and permissions to filename and line-ending problems. She wraps up with complete references to CVS commands, CVSROOT files and variables, environment variables, keywords, and more. Very handy. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780596004590
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
06/01/2003
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
7.12(w) x 9.16(h) x 0.85(d)

Meet the Author

Jennifer Vesperman is the author of Essential CVS. She writes for the O'Reilly Network, the Linux Documentation Project, and occasionally Linux.Com. As a programmer and system administrator, she currently works with Cybersource, an Australian IT consulting firm. She is the current Coordinator for LinuxChix, an advocacy and support group that focuses on women who use and develop open source programs (especially Linux).

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Essential CVS 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Are you a software developer tracking different versions of the same code? If you are, then this book is for you. Author Jennifer Vesperman, has done an outstanding job of writing a book that is current for both the stable and feature tracks of CVS. Vesperman, begins with an overview of CVS. Then, the author explains how to build and use a basic CVS repository with the default settings and a minimum of extras. Next, she explains the everyday CVS commands and concepts. The author also explains tagging and branching, including why and when to tag or branch your project, tagging before releases, and using branching to create a bug fix version of a project. She continues by explaining the systems used in CVS to permit multiple developers to work on the same project without loss of data. Then, the author discusses repository management and the modules in the repository. Next, she covers the tools used by project administrators. The author then discusses security considerations, methods of remote access, and how to set up each method. She continues by providing examples of things that can go wrong when using CVS and how to fix them. Then, the author provides a list of CVS commands. Finally, the author covers CVS administrative files. This most excellent book is complete and easy-to-follow reference that helps you apply order to the task of managing a large quantity of documents. Perhaps more importantly, this book has been expanded to explain common usage¿s of CVS for system administrators, project managers, writers, and anyone else who has to manage files that change often.