The Essential Java Class Reference for Programmers / Edition 3

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Overview

This third edition of The Essential Java Class Reference for Programmers is an easy to use, very concise and inexpensive tutorial/reference to the key class libraries used for everyday programming. The new edition has been updated for JSE 5.0. Chapter topics include Java class reference, complete examples, an HTML tutorial, Java programming glossary, and error messages with explanations. The book includes an interactive website tutorial with examples showing how to use the libraries in Java programs. For use as a reference by professionals working with Java programming and language.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Intended for beginning and intermediate-level Java programmers, this brief guide describes 125 of the most common Java classes and offers a tutorial-style introduction to HTML. It provides about 100 short code examples and five complete programs. A companion CD-ROM contains Java 2 SDK v2.4, Forte for Java 3.0, Sun Java tools, and an integrated development environment. Durney teaches programming at Utah Valley State College. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131856455
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 11/1/2004
  • Edition description: 3RD
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 216
  • Product dimensions: 6.92 (w) x 9.05 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Read an Excerpt

This manual has been written to meet the demand for an easy-to-use guide to the rich resources available from Sun Microsystems to support the Java programming language.

The programming tools presented in this manual are very powerful, but often are not easily accessible to beginning programmers. In addition, descriptions of how to use these tools cannot easily be integrated into introductory textbooks. The manual is a perfect supplement to programming textbooks that focus on the Java language and its features. Here the focus is a hands-on and tutorial-style introduction to programming tools and resources.

Let's now look at the tools and resources covered in this manual.

One of the great features of the Java programming language is that it is available for free. You can download the Java Software Development Kit (SDK) from:

http://java.sun.com

Another great feature of Java is the Java API, which is a large library of classes that you can use in your programs. The classes in the API are useful because they make lots of things easier, including graphics and network communication, but there are many classes, with many methods, that can be confusing to beginning and intermediate Java programmers. The Java Class Reference section of this manual will help you find your way around the Java API. In the class reference, you'll find descriptions of the most commonly used classes and methods. In fact, the classes and methods presented were chosen by Prentice Hall textbook authors specifically because they will be the most useful for the beginning and intermediate Java programmer.

Even the best description can leave you wondering how to use a method in your program, so the class reference includes plenty of code examples, ranging from a single line of code to 10 or 20 lines. If you want to write a Java program and don't know where to start, turn to the Complete Examples chapter of the book. This chapter includes examples of both applications and applets. There is a GUI (Graphic User Interface) application and a text-interface application, so whatever kind of Java program you're writing, you'll find a starting point in this section.

If you like to show off your programs, you can put them on a Web site. Anyone in the world who has an Internet connection and a Java-enabled browser can try out your programs. Of course, a great applet deserves a great Web page, and the HTML Tutorial section will teach you how to put a Web page together and add your applet.

If you're new to programming, you've probably encountered a lot of unfamiliar terms or familiar terms used in unfamiliar ways. The Java Programming Glossary can help you figure out just what people are talking about when they mention "objects," "references," or any number of things related to Java programming. If you have some programming experience, but are new to Java, the glossary will help you learn terms that you might not be familiar with, like "exception" or "final."

Unfortunately, compilers are notorious for giving error messages that make no sense. Eventually you'll figure them all out, but until then you'll want to turn to the Java Error Messages with Explanations section of the book. There you'll find descriptions of errors that are more than one line long, as well as likely causes of the error.

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Table of Contents

Java Class Reference

Using the Web-Based API Documentation

Documentation for Selected Packages and Classes

java.applet Package

java.awt Package

java.awt.event Package

java.io Package

java.lang Package

java.math Package

java.net Package

java.text Package

java.util Package

java.util Package: Collections Framework

javax.swing Package

Complete Examples

How to Run Applications

How to Run Applets

Example: PageWriter

Example: PictureFrame

Example: ShowDocApplet

Example: SpotlightApplet

Example: ColorPanel

Example: WordCount

An HTML Tutorial

What Makes a Good Web Page?

Tools

Publishing Web Pages

Basics

Tables

Frames

Beyond Text and Pictures

Java Programming Glossary

Error Messages with Explanations

Using compiler error messages

Messages with explanations

Exceptions and Run-Time Error Messages

Logic Errors and Debugging

Hierarchical Index

Index

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Preface

This manual has been written to meet the demand for an easy-to-use guide to the rich resources available from Sun Microsystems to support the Java programming language.

The programming tools presented in this manual are very powerful, but often are not easily accessible to beginning programmers. In addition, descriptions of how to use these tools cannot easily be integrated into introductory textbooks. The manual is a perfect supplement to programming textbooks that focus on the Java language and its features. Here the focus is a hands-on and tutorial-style introduction to programming tools and resources.

Let's now look at the tools and resources covered in this manual.

One of the great features of the Java programming language is that it is available for free. You can download the Java Software Development Kit (SDK) from:

http://java.sun.com

Another great feature of Java is the Java API, which is a large library of classes that you can use in your programs. The classes in the API are useful because they make lots of things easier, including graphics and network communication, but there are many classes, with many methods, that can be confusing to beginning and intermediate Java programmers. The Java Class Reference section of this manual will help you find your way around the Java API. In the class reference, you'll find descriptions of the most commonly used classes and methods. In fact, the classes and methods presented were chosen by Prentice Hall textbook authors specifically because they will be the most useful for the beginning and intermediate Java programmer.

Even the best description can leave you wondering how to use a method in your program, so the class reference includes plenty of code examples, ranging from a single line of code to 10 or 20 lines. If you want to write a Java program and don't know where to start, turn to the Complete Examples chapter of the book. This chapter includes examples of both applications and applets. There is a GUI (Graphic User Interface) application and a text-interface application, so whatever kind of Java program you're writing, you'll find a starting point in this section.

If you like to show off your programs, you can put them on a Web site. Anyone in the world who has an Internet connection and a Java-enabled browser can try out your programs. Of course, a great applet deserves a great Web page, and the HTML Tutorial section will teach you how to put a Web page together and add your applet.

If you're new to programming, you've probably encountered a lot of unfamiliar terms or familiar terms used in unfamiliar ways. The Java Programming Glossary can help you figure out just what people are talking about when they mention "objects," "references," or any number of things related to Java programming. If you have some programming experience, but are new to Java, the glossary will help you learn terms that you might not be familiar with, like "exception" or "final."

Unfortunately, compilers are notorious for giving error messages that make no sense. Eventually you'll figure them all out, but until then you'll want to turn to the Java Error Messages with Explanations section of the book. There you'll find descriptions of errors that are more than one line long, as well as likely causes of the error.

Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2005

    useful, but perhaps not for applets?

    As Java has gotten built out, the default SDK has a huge number of packages. Can be overwhelming. Typically you don't need to know all or even most of these. But which should you know? Durney supplies one such choice of packages in his book. It does not cover those packages or classes involving elementary syntax. You should already have these down. Instead, he offers certain packages of high utility. Take the NumberFormat class as an example. It lets you control the number of digits in an output. Then there are the far more complex Date and Calendar classes. These deal with various different conventions for showing the date, as well as a host of language dependent issues. For example, in most of the world, a date is written in the format day-month-year. But the US uses month-day-year. So you might need to customise your displays accordingly. These classes are also deal with the non-metric nature of the many time divisions. As a programmer, you can use the classes instead of having to re-invent a lot of functionality. But the book's chapter on Applet usage may be less useful to many readers. As Java has developed, Applets have gotten steadily downplayed. Little serious programming appears to be done with these. Before some of you get irate and berate me, take a look at the latest Sun documentation. Sun has pushed Java steadily into server-side applications, where it is doing quite well.

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