The Essential New York Times Cookbook: Classic Recipes for a New Century
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The Essential New York Times Cookbook: Classic Recipes for a New Century

2.7 102
by Amanda Hesser
     
 

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Winner of the 2011 James Beard Foundation Award in General Cooking: All the best recipes from 150 years of distinguished food journalism-a volume to take its place in America's kitchens alongside Mastering the Art of French Cooking and How to Cook Everything.
Amanda Hesser, the well-known New York Times food columnist, brings her signature voice and

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Overview

Winner of the 2011 James Beard Foundation Award in General Cooking: All the best recipes from 150 years of distinguished food journalism-a volume to take its place in America's kitchens alongside Mastering the Art of French Cooking and How to Cook Everything.
Amanda Hesser, the well-known New York Times food columnist, brings her signature voice and expertise to this compendium of influential and delicious recipes from chefs, home cooks, and food writers. Devoted Times subscribers will find the many treasured recipes they have cooked for years—Plum Torte, David Eyre's Pancake, Pamela Sherrid's Summer Pasta—as well as favorites from the early Craig Claiborne New York Times Cookbook and a host of other classics—from 1940s Caesar salad and 1960s flourless chocolate cake to today's fava bean salad and no-knead bread.
Hesser has cooked and updated every one of the 1,000-plus recipes here. Her chapter introductions showcase the history of American cooking, and her witty and fascinating headnotes share what makes each recipe special. The Essential New York Times Cookbook is for people who grew up in the kitchen with Claiborne, for curious cooks who want to serve a nineteenth-century raspberry granita to their friends, and for the new cook who needs a book that explains everything from how to roll out dough to how to slow-roast fish—a volume that will serve as a lifelong companion.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Hesser, a food columnist for the New York Times, offers a superb compilation of the most noteworthy recipes published by the paper since it started covering food in the 1850s. What she has produced is no less a chronicle of American culinary history--an evolutionary progression that marks the notable and sometimes regrettable changes in our approach to food--than a cookbook. Recipe originators are a hodgepodge of talent, including noted chefs and the kitchens of famed restaurants such as Le Bernardin as well as Times writers, most notably Craig Claiborne, whose culinary mastery is evidenced throughout. Every category of food is covered, and each recipe is accompanied by serving suggestions for complementary dishes within the book. From 1877's tomato soup and 1907's roast quail with sage dressing to Eisenhower's steak in the fire and 1968's sour cream coffee cake, Hesser showcases the best of the best. Each recipe is dated, and many include cooking notes. Hesser, whose witty bent permeates every page, does a more than admirable job with this stellar collection of more than 1,400 recipes, which should grace the shelves of every food-lover. (Oct.)
Library Journal
[star]New York Times food editor and writer Hesser (Cooking for Mr. Latte) spent six years combing the Times's vast recipe archive, cooking her way through more than 1000 recipes to assemble this indispensible tome culled from 150 years of the paper's food columns. This daunting compendium features both noteworthy classics (Osso Buco) and modern recipes (Smoked Mashed Potatoes) that have been tested and, in some cases, updated for the contemporary cook. Chapters begin with a time line and are arranged by type of food (e.g., soups, vegetables, cakes) then chronologically within the chapter, making for a fascinating historic overview of the interests of American cooks. Recipes contain informative, entertaining, and unaffected introductions by Hesser coupled with cooking notes and serving suggestions. Citations for the original articles are included, should one wish to read the recipe in its original context.Verdict Intended as an "eclectic panorama" of recipes rather than an encyclopedic cookbook, this is an excellent addition for home chefs of all abilities. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/10; six-city tour.]—Pauline Baughman, Multnomah Cty. Lib., Portland, OR

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393061031
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
10/25/2010
Pages:
960
Sales rank:
112,680
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 10.10(h) x 2.20(d)

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Meet the Author

Amanda Hesser has been a food columnist and editor at the New York Times for more than a decade. She is the author of The Essential New York Times Cookbook, the award-winning Cooking for Mr. Latte and The Cook and the Gardener, and editor of the essay collection Eat, Memory.
Hesser is also the co-founder of food52.com. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband, Tad Friend, and their two children.

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Essential New York Times Cookbook 2.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 102 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have a ton of cookbooks and was severely disappointed with this one. The recipes just aren't appealing enough to actually MAKE.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have a collection of the New York Times Cookbooks dating back to 1961. This author has not included any of the best. Disappointed and gave the book away. Not one recipe worth trying.
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