Essential Readings in Canadian Constitutional Politics

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Overview

Essential Readings in Canadian Constitutional Politics introduces students, scholars, and practitioners to classic authors and writings on the principles of the Canadian Constitution as well as to select contemporary material. To complement rather than duplicate the state of the field, it deals with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and with Canadian mega-constitutional politics in passing only, focusing instead on institutions, federalism, intergovernmental relations, bilingualism and binationalism, the judiciary, minority rights, and constitutional renewal. Many of the selections reverberate well beyond Canada's borders, making this volume an unrivalled resource for anyone interested in constitutional governance and democratic politics in diverse societies.
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What People Are Saying

Janet Hiebert
This is a must-read collection of seminal essays that will be a valuable addition to the library of any serious student of Canadian constitutional politics. The collection includes familiar gems and a few forgotten ones, all of which warrant our renewed interest and intention for their illumination of the ideas and controversies upon which Canadian constitutionalism rests.
John McGarry
Canada has long been looked to by comparativists, who are either intrigued by why it has survived intact in spite of its diversity, or by why it appears in danger of break-up in spite of its moderate political culture and prosperity. At last, they have a single text which collects together the classical answers to these questions. Edited by a young immigrant academic and a long-established scholar of Canadian constitutionalism, the contents have been carefully selected to give outside scholars a fundamental primer in Canada's political development since confederation. It's the first book on Canadian politics that outsiders should have on their shelves.
John Meisel
This book's arrival could not be more timely: Canada is about to enter rough constitutional waters again. With a veritable Hall of Fame of relevant experts, this collection provides the essential background for upcoming quests by students and practitioners to find reasonable solutions.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442603684
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Higher Education Division
  • Publication date: 7/18/2011
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 512
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Christian Leuprecht is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and Economics at the Royal Military College of Canada. He is also cross-appointed to the Department of Political Studies and School of Public Policy Studies at Queen's University.

Peter H. Russell is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He has written extensively on issues related to the Canadian Constitution and Canadian politics in general.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Part One: Institutions

Introduction to Part One

1. Robert MacGregor Dawson, "The Constitution"

2. James Mallory, "The Pattern of the Constitution"

3. James Mallory, "Responsive and Responsible Government"

4. Eugene Forsey and G.C. Eglinton, "The Question of Confidence in Responsible Government"

5. David E. Smith, "The Canadian Senate: What Is To Be Done?"

6. Ronald L. Watts, "The Federative Superstructure"

Part Two: Federalism

Introduction to Part Two

7. George Stanley, "A Short History of the Constitution"

8. George Rawlyk, "The Historical Framework of the Maritimes and the Problems of Confederation"

9. A.I. Silver, "Confederation and Quebec"

10. Donald Creighton, "The Division of Economic Powers at Confederation"

11. Samuel La Selva, "Confederation and the Beginnings of Canadian Federalist Theory"

Part Three: Intergovernmental Relations

Introduction to Part Three

12. Donald Smiley, "The Rowell-Sirois Report: An abridgement of Book 1 of the Royal Commission Report on Dominion-Provincial Relations"

13. Richard Simeon, "The Social and Institutional Context of Federal-Provincial Diplomacy"

14. Peter H. Russell, "Provincial Rights"

15. Christopher Armstrong, "The Mowat Heritage in Federal-Provincial Relations"

16. Peter H. Russell, "The Supreme Court and Federal-Provincial Relations: The Political Use of Legal Resources"

Part Four: The Judiciary

Introduction to Part Four

17. Jennifer Smith, "The Origins of Judicial Review in Canada"

18. Alan Cairns, "The Judicial Committee and Its Critics"

19. John Saywell, "The Watson Era, 1889-1912"

20. Frank R. Scott, "Some Privy Counsel"

21. Alan Cairns, "The Living Canadian Constitution"

22. William Lederman, "The Independence of the Judiciary"

23. Peter Hogg, "Is the Supreme Court of Canada Biased in Constitutional Cases?"

Part Five: Bilingualism and Binationalism

Introduction to Part Five

24. A.I. Silver, "Manitoba Schools and the Rise of Bilingualism"

25. J.W. Dafoe, "Laurier: A Study in Canadian Politics"

26. Louis-Philippe Pigeon, "The Meaning of Provincial Autonomy"

27. Alexander Brady, "Quebec and Canadian Federalism"

28. Pierre Elliott Trudeau, "Quebec and the Constitutional Problem"

29. Guy Laforest, "Lord Durham, French Canada and Quebec: Remembering the Past, Debating the Future"

Part Six: The Charter

Introduction to Part Six

30. Alan Cairns, "Reflections on the Political Purposes of the Charter"

31. John Whyte, "On Not Standing for Notwithstanding"

32. Peter H. Russell, "Standing Up for Notwithstanding"

33. Richard Sigurdson, "Left- and Right-Wing Charterphobia in Canada: A Critique of the Critics"

Part Seven: Minority Rights and Constitutional Renewal

Introduction to Part Seven

34. Roger Gibbins and Loleen Berdahl, "Western Canadian Perspectives on Institutional Reform: Introduction and Context"

35. Gordon Robertson, "The Holy Grail: Provincial Status"

36. Gil RĂ©millard, "The Constitution Act, 1982: An Unfinished Compromise"

37. Roderick A. Macdonald, "Three Centuries of Constitution Making in Canada: Will There Be a Fourth?"

38. Sujit Choudhry and Robert Howse, "Constitutional Theory and the Quebec Secession Reference"

39. John Borrows, "Recovering Canada: The Resurgence of Indigenous Law"

40. Brian Slattery, "Making Sense of Aboriginal and Treaty Rights"

41. Peter H. Russell, "Canada: A Pioneer in the Management of Constitutional Politics in a Multi-National Society"

Credits

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