Essentials of ATM Networks and Services

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Overview

"The fact that this is an 'essentials only' book makes it unique. It's a good book as an introduction to the new ATM technology."

-Matthew Scott, Software Engineer, FORE Systems

Anyone needing an introduction to the ATM network will find this book's unique approach a valuable asset in getting up to speed on this growing technology. Intended as a quick reference to the ATM network, Essentials of ATM Networks and Services begins with an overview of the technology and then provides an explanation of the services defined for ATM. Developed from an author-taught introductory course on ATM networks and services, this book covers every aspect of ATM while focusing primarily on the services-the various ways of handling information throughout a network. Some of the services included are:

  • ATM LAN emulation
  • IP over ATM
  • Multiprotocol over ATM
  • Frame-based access services
  • Audiovisual multimedia services over ATM
  • Inverse multiplexing over ATM
  • Circuit emulation service

In addition, the author addresses the impact of IP switching and XDSL, technologies that have been developed since the introduction of ATM. You will learn how they affect ATM services and what challenges they pose to the network.

Whether you are using IP over ATM, multiprotocol over ATM, PNNI, LAN emulation, or traffic management, this book is more than an excellent ATM reference: It clearly explains ATM technology and implementation to anyone involved in the design, deployment, or support of a corporate ATM network.

0201184613B04062001

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201184617
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 9/12/1997
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Oliver C. Ibe received a Sc.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and holds an MBA from Northeastern University. He is currently a network architect at Xyplex Networks. He has been associated with the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, and GTE Laboratories and has also been a visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Ibe was the managing editor of Computer Networks and ISDN Systems, and is a senior member of the IEEE.

0201184613AB04062001

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Read an Excerpt

The data communications and telecommunications industries are experiencing remarkable growth. One of the forces driving this growth is the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology. Although ATM networks are not widely deployed at this time, they have already generated much curiosity and sparked much debate over how current and new telecommunications services will be offered. In short, ATM has the potential to change the nature of service provisioning in both the data communications and telecommunications industries.

This book is based in part on a series of lectures I gave as an introduction to ATM networks. The material came from several sources, including ATM Forum specifications, IETF RFCs and Internet-draft proposals, and ITU-T recommendations. As the title indicates, the book covers the essentials of ATM technology and summarizes the many services being defined over ATM networks. Any reader that is interested in more detailed information on any of the topics covered here should consult more advanced textbooks or the appropriate standards, recommendations, and specifications. I have tried to simplify the technical details with flow diagrams and examples. I hope that in the process I have maintained the delicate balance between technical correctness and simplicity of presentation. As stated above, the focus of this book is on both ATM technology and the services that can be obtained from that technology. There is often the temptation to stress which of the emerging standards are relevant and which have been implemented. The problem with this line of thinking is that ATM standards are still evolving. A lot of time and resources have been spent by many people to develop these standards. To say that any one standard is not relevant is unfair to the people who have worked so hard on these standards to ensure that ATM succeeds. What has not been implemented today may be implemented tomorrow. For this reason, and in fairness to the many people who have worked so hard on the different standards committees, this book discusses many of the approved and evolving standards without considering their implementation. Moreover, since implementations are generally vendor specific, an attempt has been made to avoid discussing any implementation issues in order not to favor one vendor over others. In this respect, this book is different from other books on ATM. It presents ATM technology and emerging and approved standards for the different services and leaves it up to the reader to judge what is relevant to him or her and what is not.

The first half of the book provides an overview of ATM technology. This includes Chapter 1 through Chapter 8. The second half, which starts at Chapter 9, attempts to explain the services that are being defined for ATM networks. These services include ATM LAN emulation, IP over ATM, multiprotocol over ATM, frame-based access services over ATM, audiovisual multimedia services over ATM, circuit emulation service, and inverse multiplexing over ATM. Most of these services are still being defined. However, it is my belief that the underlying architectures will not deviate radically from where they are today. Even if they do, the reader will gain enough understanding to follow the changes without being confused. Chapter 1 gives a comprehensive overview of telecommunication and networking basics. It also discusses the evolution of ATM networks, the major forces driving ATM networks, and the market for ATM networks. An extensive glossary of terms is provided at the end of the book. This book is intended for data communications and information systems managers who want a quick reference on ATM networks. The book is also suitable for corporate courses on ATM networks and services. Because network experts tend to focus on one or two aspects of ATM technology, this book will be an appropriate resource for obtaining a quick overview of ATM networks. Finally, the book can also be used for an introductory graduate course in ATM networks.

Many networking technologies have been introduced since the advent of ATM. Some of them will impact ATM network services in one way or another. Two of these technologies are IP switching and the digital subscriber line family of technologies. The impact of IP switching on both the ATM Forum's multiprotocol over ATM and the IETF's IP over ATM is discussed briefly in Chapter 11. Similarly, the impact of the digital subscriber line family of technologies on ATM inverse multiplexing service is discussed in Chapter 15.


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Table of Contents

(Each chapter begins with an Introduction and concludes with a Summary.)

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

1. Introduction.

Telecommunications Primer.

Transmission Method.

Data Flow Direction.

Network Topologies.

Geographical Coverage.

Data Transfer Techniques.

Network Access Techniques.

Multiplexing.

Data Communication Network Architecture.

X.25 Network Architecture.

Internet Architecture.

SS7 Network Architecture.

The Integrated Services Digital Network.

ISDN Reference Configuration.

Broadband ISDN.

Why ATM?

ATM Applications.

ATM Standardization.

2. ATM Basics.

B-ISDN Architecture.

ATM Cell Header.

3. ATM Networking.

VP and VC Switching.

The ATM User-Network Interface Signaling.

ATM Addressing.

IDP Components.

DSP Components.

UNI Signaling 4.0.

Call/Connection Setup.

Data Transfer.

Call/Connection Release.

UNI Signaling 3.0 and UNI Signaling 3.1.

4. ATM Traffic Classification.

User Service Classes.

ATM Adaptation Layer Traffic Types.

QoS Classes.

ATM Service Categories.

5. The ATM Adaptation Layer.

The Adaptation Process.

AAL Process for Different AAL Types.

AAL Type 1.

AAL Type 2.

AAL Type 3/4.

AAL Type 5.

Signaling AAL.

6. ATM Network Management.

Overview of the TMN.

Overview of the SNMP.

Operations and Maintenance Cell Flows.

ATM Network Management Reference Model.

The M1 Interface: ATM Terminal Device Management.

The M2 Interface: Private ATM Network Management.

The M3 Interface: The Customer Network Management.

The M4 Interface.

The M5 Interface.

The Integrated Local Management Interface.

ATM MIB.

7. ATM Traffic Management.

Resource Management.

Connection Admission Control.

Usage Parameter Control.

Generic Cell Rate Algorithm.

Virtual Scheduling Algorithm.

Continuous-State Leaky-Bucket Algorithm.

Traffic Shaping.

Congestion Control.

Selective Cell Discarding.

Explicit Forward Congestion Indication (EFCI).

ABR Flow Control.

Rate-Based Flow Control.

Credit-Based Flow Control.

Comparison of the Flow Control Schemes.

Quantum Flow Control Alliance

8. Private Network-Network Interface.

IISP.

PNNI Version 1.0.

Routing Architecture.

Peer Group Leader Election.

Hello Protocol.

Topology State Database Exchange.

Topology State Summarization.

Hierarchical Path Determination.

Signaling Architecture.

DTL Processing.

Crankback and Rerouting.

A Sample PNNI Version 1.0 Network Hierarchy Model.

9. The ATM LAN Emulation Service.

LANE Protocol Stack.

LANE Components.

Principles of LAN Emulation.

Configuration.

Joining and Registration.

Address Resolution.

Example of LANE Operation.

10. IP Over ATM.

Packet Encapsulation.

Address Resolution.

IP Multicasting Over ATM.

Next Hop Resolution Protocol.

NHS Configuration Modes.

NHRP Address Resolution.

Internet Integrated Services.

RSVP.

Operation of the RSVP.

IS Over ATM.

Orientation.

Resource State.

Heterogeneity.

Routing.

QoS Renegotiation.

Directionality.

11. Multiprotocol Over.

MPOA Components.

Operation of the MPOA.

Configuration.

Discovery.

MPOA Target Resolution.

Data Transfer.

Examples of MPOA Operation.

Intra-IASG Flows.

Inter-IASG Flows.

The IP Switching Challenge.

IP Switch Detailed Operation.

Comments on IP Switching.

12. Frame-Based Access Services.

ATM DXI.

ATM FUNI.

Frame Relay Over ATM.

Overview of Frame Relay.

Frame Relay and ATM.

13. Audiovisual Multimedia Service.

Video-on-Demand Service.

VoD System Structure.

Network Adaptation.

VoD Protocol Reference Model.

14. Circuit Emulation Service.

Structured DS1/E1 Service.

Unstructured DS1/E1 Service.

CES Trunking for Narrowband Services.

15. ATM Inverse Multiplexing Service.

Inverse Multiplexing Basics.

ATM Inverse Multiplexing.

IMA Unit Reference Model.

The IMA Control Protocol Cell.

Delay Compensation.

Cell Stuffing.

The Future of IMUX and IMA.

ADSL vs. IMA.

A. Abbreviations.

B. Glossary.

References.

Index. 0201184613T04062001

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Preface

The data communications and telecommunications industries are experiencing remarkable growth. One of the forces driving this growth is the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology. Although ATM networks are not widely deployed at this time, they have already generated much curiosity and sparked much debate over how current and new telecommunications services will be offered. In short, ATM has the potential to change the nature of service provisioning in both the data communications and telecommunications industries.

This book is based in part on a series of lectures I gave as an introduction to ATM networks. The material came from several sources, including ATM Forum specifications, IETF RFCs and Internet-draft proposals, and ITU-T recommendations. As the title indicates, the book covers the essentials of ATM technology and summarizes the many services being defined over ATM networks. Any reader that is interested in more detailed information on any of the topics covered here should consult more advanced textbooks or the appropriate standards, recommendations, and specifications. I have tried to simplify the technical details with flow diagrams and examples. I hope that in the process I have maintained the delicate balance between technical correctness and simplicity of presentation. As stated above, the focus of this book is on both ATM technology and the services that can be obtained from that technology. There is often the temptation to stress which of the emerging standards are relevant and which have been implemented. The problem with this line of thinking is that ATM standards are still evolving. A lot of time and resources have been spent by many people to develop these standards. To say that any one standard is not relevant is unfair to the people who have worked so hard on these standards to ensure that ATM succeeds. What has not been implemented today may be implemented tomorrow. For this reason, and in fairness to the many people who have worked so hard on the different standards committees, this book discusses many of the approved and evolving standards without considering their implementation. Moreover, since implementations are generally vendor specific, an attempt has been made to avoid discussing any implementation issues in order not to favor one vendor over others. In this respect, this book is different from other books on ATM. It presents ATM technology and emerging and approved standards for the different services and leaves it up to the reader to judge what is relevant to him or her and what is not.

The first half of the book provides an overview of ATM technology. This includes Chapter 1 through Chapter 8. The second half, which starts at Chapter 9, attempts to explain the services that are being defined for ATM networks. These services include ATM LAN emulation, IP over ATM, multiprotocol over ATM, frame-based access services over ATM, audiovisual multimedia services over ATM, circuit emulation service, and inverse multiplexing over ATM. Most of these services are still being defined. However, it is my belief that the underlying architectures will not deviate radically from where they are today. Even if they do, the reader will gain enough understanding to follow the changes without being confused. Chapter 1 gives a comprehensive overview of telecommunication and networking basics. It also discusses the evolution of ATM networks, the major forces driving ATM networks, and the market for ATM networks. An extensive glossary of terms is provided at the end of the book. This book is intended for data communications and information systems managers who want a quick reference on ATM networks. The book is also suitable for corporate courses on ATM networks and services. Because network experts tend to focus on one or two aspects of ATM technology, this book will be an appropriate resource for obtaining a quick overview of ATM networks. Finally, the book can also be used for an introductory graduate course in ATM networks.

Many networking technologies have been introduced since the advent of ATM. Some of them will impact ATM network services in one way or another. Two of these technologies are IP switching and the digital subscriber line family of technologies. The impact of IP switching on both the ATM Forum's multiprotocol over ATM and the IETF's IP over ATM is discussed briefly in Chapter 11. Similarly, the impact of the digital subscriber line family of technologies on ATM inverse multiplexing service is discussed in Chapter 15.

0201184613P04062001

Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2000

    GREAT GREAT BOOK !!!!!!

    There is no doubt that this is the one of the greatest book , I've ever seen on ATM. Unlike the other big,heavy, bulky books, it's written in a very concise and simple way. It gives you a touch of all the technologies. The bad part on the author's side is , he never followed up with the newer version of this book. Since it was written in 1997, even than I'll recommend this book to be used in year 2000.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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