Essentials of Genetics / Edition 8

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$29.33
(Save 80%)
Est. Return Date: 09/23/2014
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$130.14
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$99.09
(Save 31%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $84.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 42%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (39) from $84.00   
  • New (10) from $129.95   
  • Used (29) from $84.00   

Overview

Known for its focus on conceptual understanding, problem solving, and practical explanations, this best-seller strengthens problem solving coverage and explores the essential genetics content today’s students need to know. This edition maintains the book’s briefer, less-detailed approach to teaching core concepts. New features of the Eighth Edition include four new Special Topics chapters and thorough updates.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A text for undergraduate courses requiring shorter and more basic coverage than the companion text, Concepts of Genetics, especially for students with minimal backgrounds in biology and chemistry. Learning aids include chapter summaries, boxes on analytical thinking and experimental rationale, problems and discussion questions, and color photos and diagrams. This second edition includes new material on emerging topics, essays on controversial subjects, and an increased emphasis on problem solving. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321803115
  • Publisher: Benjamin Cummings
  • Publication date: 10/26/2012
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 8
  • Pages: 608
  • Sales rank: 236,951
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

William S. Klug is currently Professor of Biology at the College of New Jersey (formerly Trenton State College) in Ewing, New Jersey. He served as chair of the Biology Department for 17 years, a position to which he was first elected in 1974. He received his B.A. degree in Biology from Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana, and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Prior to coming to the College of New Jersey, he was on the faculty of Wabash College as an Assistant Professor. His research interests have involved ultrastructural and molecular genetic studies of oogenesis in Drosophila. He has taught the genetics course as well as the senior capstone seminar course in human and molecular genetics to undergraduate biology majors for each of the last 35 years. In 2002, he was the recipient of the initial teaching award given at the College of New Jersey granted to the faculty member who most challenges students to achieve high standards. He also received the 2004 Outstanding Professor Award from the Sigma Pi International, and in the same year, he was nominated as the Educator of the Year, an award given by the Research and Development Council of New Jersey.

Michael R. Cummings is currently Research Professor in the Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois. For more than 25 years, he was a faculty member in the Department of Biological Sciences and in the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has also served on the faculties of Northwestern University and Florida State University. He received his B.A. from St. Mary's College in Winona, Minnesota, and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. In addition to Essentials of Genetics and its companion volumes, he has also authored several texts in human genetics and general biology for non-majors. His research interests center on the molecular organization and physical mapping of the heterochromatic regions of human acrocentric chromosomes. At the undergraduate level, he teaches courses in Mendelian and molecular genetics, human genetics, and general biology, and has received numerous awards for teaching excellence given by university faculty, student organizations, and graduating seniors.

Charlotte A. Spencer is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Oncology at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. She has also served as a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Alberta. She received her B.Sc. in Microbiology from the University of British Columbia and he Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of Alberta, followed by postdoctoral training at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. Her research interests involve the regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription in cancer cells, cells infected with DNA viruses and cells transversing the mitotic phase of the cell cycle. She has taught courses in Biochemistry, Genetics, Molecular Biology and Oncology, at both undergraduate and graduate levels. She has contributed Genetics, Technology and Society essays for several editions of Concepts of Genetics as well as Essentials of Genetics. In addition, she has written booklets in the Exploring Biology series, which are aimed at the undergraduate nonmajors level.

Michael A. Palladino is Dean of the School of Science and Associate Professor of Biology at Monmouth University in West Long Branch, New Jersey. He received his B.S. degree in Biology from Trenton State College (now known as The College of New Jersey) and his Ph.D. in Anatomy and Cell Biology from the University of Virginia. He directs an active laboratory of undergraduate student researchers studying molecular mechanisms involved in innate immunity of mammalian male reproductive organs and genes involved in oxygen homeostasis and ischemic injury of the testis. He has taught a wide range of courses for both majors and nonmajors and currently teaches genetics, biotechnology, endocrinology, and laboratory in cell and molecular biology. He has received several awards for research and teaching, including the 2009 Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Andrology, the 2005 Distinguished Teacher Award from Monmouth University, and the 2005 Caring Heart Award from the New Jersey Association for Biomedical Research. In addition to Essentials of Genetics and its companion volumes, he is co-author of the undergraduate textbook Introduction to Biotechnology, Series Editor for the Benjamin Cummings Special Topics in Biology booklet series, and author of the first booklet in the series, Understanding the Human Genome Project.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Essentials of Genetics is written for courses requiring a text that is shorter and more basic than its more comprehensive companion, Concepts of Genetics. While coverage is thorough, current, and of high quality, Essentials is written to be more accessible to biology majors early in their undergraduate careers, as well as by a mixture of students majoring in agriculture, forestry, wildlife management, chemistry, psychology, and so on. Because the text is shorter than many other books, Essentials of Genetics will be more manageable in one-quarter and one-semester courses.

Goals

Although Essentials of Genetics is almost 300 pages shorter than its companion volume, our goals are the same for both books. Specifically, we seek to

  • Emphasize concepts rather than excessive detail
  • Write clearly and directly to students in order to provide understandable explanations of complex, analytical topics
  • Establish a careful organization within and between chapters
  • Maintain constant emphasis on scientific analysis as the means to illustrate how we know what we know
  • Propagate the rich history of genetics that so beautifully illustrates how information is acquired and extended within the discipline as it develops and grows
  • Create inviting, engaging, and pedagogically useful full-color figures enhanced by equally helpful photographs to support concept development

These goals serve as the cornerstones of Essentials of Genetics. This pedagogic foundation allows the book to accommodate courses with many different approaches and lecture formats. Chapters are written to beas independent of one another as possible, allowing instructors to utilize them in various sequences. We believe that the varied approaches embodied in these goals work together to provide students with optimal support for their study of genetics.

Features of the Fourth Edition

  • Online Media Tutorials—Students are guided in their understanding of important concepts by working through what are simply the best animations, tutorial exercises, and self-assessment tools available.
  • Length—Once again we have managed to streamline the text. This new Essentials is 508 pages, 7 pages shorter than the previous edition.
  • Revised Organization—We provide an improved chapter sequence designed to flow smoothly from start to finish, including an early (the first chapter) introduction to DNA as well a cohesive sequence of chapters centering on the genetic role of DNA, its structure, replication, expression, and regulation.
  • New Chapters—Sex Determination and Sex Chromosomes combines new information with parts of chapters from the previous edition; Genomics and Proteomics is a totally new chapter that gives students concepts and tools necessary to understand the information explosion occurring in these fields. The chapter entitled Conservation Genetics represents the first coverage of this emerging discipline in any genetics textbook.
  • Redesign of the Art Program—The pedagogic value, to say nothing of the beautiful execution, of the new art program will be readily apparent to users of the previous edition.
  • Section Numbers—All sections are numbered making it easier to assign topics and for students to find topics within chapters
  • New Photographs—An even greater number of photographs illustrate and enhance this edition.
  • Emerging Topics in Genetics—Coverage of cutting edge topics includes comparative genomics, which analyzes the recently sequenced genomes of a number of organisms, including our own species (Chapter 18); proteomics, which attempts to define the potential role of the genes discovered during the Human Genome Project (Chapter 18); and conservation genetics, which assesses and attempts to maintain genetic diversity in the many endangered species on our planet (Chapter 24).
  • Modernization of Topics—In addition to the areas considered in the section above on emerging topics, modernization is particularly evident in the discussions of recombinant DNA technology (Chapter 16), the organization of repetitive DNA sequences in the human genome (Chapter 17), the role of genetics in the origin of cancer (Chapter 21), and the analysis of HIV infection and resistance in population genetic studies (Chapter 22).
  • New "Genetics, Technology, and Society" Essays—New topics include "Genetically Modified Foods," "DNA At the Millennium," "Completion of the Human Genome Project: The Hype and the Hope," and "Endangered Species: The Florida Panther."
  • Emphasis on Problem Solving—"Insights and Solutions" sections at the ends of chapters guide students in how to think analytically about problems. "Problems and Discussion Questions" have been expanded to offer more opportunity for study.

Emphasis on Concepts

As in its companion volume, Essentials of Genetics continues to emphasize the conceptual framework of genetics. Our experience with this approach shows that students more easily comprehend and take with them to succeeding courses the most important ideas in genetics as well as an analytic view of biological problems. To aid students in identifying conceptual aspects of a major topic, each chapter begins with a section called "Chapter Concepts," which in a few sentences captures the essence of the most important ideas about to be presented. Then, each chapter ends with a "Chapter Summary," which enumerates the five to ten key points that have been covered. These two features help to ensure that students focus on concepts and are not distracted by the many, albeit important, details of genetics. Specific examples and carefully designed figures support this approach throughout the book.

Insights and Solutions

Genetics, more than any other discipline within biology, requires problem solving and analytical thinking. At the end of each chapter we include what has become an extremely popular and successful section called "Insights and Solutions." In this section we stress:

• Problem solving
• Quantitative analysis
• Analytical thinking
• Experimental rationale

Problems or questions are posed and detailed solutions or answers are provided. This feature primes students for moving on to the "Problems and Discussion Questions" section that concludes each chapter.

Problems and Discussion Questions

In order to optimize the opportunities for student growth in the important areas of problem solving and analytical thinking, each chapter concludes with an extensive collection of problems and discussion questions. These represent various levels of difficulty, with the most challenging problems located at the end of each section. Brief answers to half the problems are in Appendix A. The Student Handbook is available to students for faculty who wish to expose their students to detailed answers to all problems and questions.

For the Student

Online Media Tutorials (New)
The most sophisticated learning and tutorial package available for students of genetics, this online tutorial support system addresses students' most difficult concepts as identified through a survey of instructors. Concepts and processes begin with an overview that usually includes animations, proceeds to one or a series of interactive exercises, followed by self quizzes. Each chapter contains a glossary, help function, search function, web links to fascinating and useful web sites, plus additional problem-solving questions. Students who experience difficulty with exercises or quizzes will be directed to specific sections of the text for review.

The following topics are addressed in the interactive media tutorials:

  • Mitosis
  • Meiosis
  • Segregation
  • Monohybrid Cross
  • Independent Assortment
  • Meiosis and Mendel
  • Extensions of Mendelian Inheritance: codominance, incomplete dominance, multiple alleles, gene interaction
  • Probability: simple probability, sum rule, product rule, binomial probability
  • Sex-Linked Inheritance: X-linked, Y -linked
  • Linkage and Recombinantion: linkage versus independent assortment
  • Linked Genes: mapping linked genes, construction of linkage maps
  • Mapping a Three-Point Cross: includes calculation of recombination frequency, interference
  • Virtual Crossover Laboratory
  • Chromosome Aberrations: overview, inversions, translocations, deletions, duplications
  • Phage Genetics: life cycle (lytic, lysogenic) phage cross, phage complementation
  • Bacterial Genetics: transformation, conjugation
  • DNA Structure: helix, components (sugar, base, phosphate), nucleotides
  • DNA Replication: components, bidirectional replication, fork formation
  • DNA Recombination (steps, structures)
  • Transcription: components, initiation, elongation, termination, genetic code, Prokaryotes versus eukaryotes
  • Translation: initiation, elongation, termination, prokaryotes versus eukaryotes, summary: DNA to RNA to protein
  • Regulation of Gene Expression: prokaryotes (lac operon)
  • Regulation of Gene Expression: eukaryotes: transcriptional regulation, alternative splicing, translational, posttranslational control
  • Mutation: gene/protein colinearity, effect on protein structure (hemoglobin)
  • Mutation at the DNA Level: nucleotide substitution, frameshift mutations
  • DNA Repair
  • Recombinant DNA Technology: restriction enzymes, cloning in plasmid vector, selection
  • PCR: mechanism, uses
  • Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms: codominant trait, transmission, linkage to disease loci
  • DNA Fingerprinting
  • Chromatin, Chromosome Structure: nucleosomes, fibers, scaffolding, isochores
  • Population Genetics: allele frequencies, Hardy-Weinberg, selection
  • Analysis of Human Pedigrees: autosomal dominant, recessive, X-linked dominant, recessive, mitochondrial
  • Nondisjunction: normal, meiosis 1, meiosis II gamete formation, fertilization outcomes
  • Chemical Mutagenesis, Ames Test
  • Restriction Mapping

Student Handbook and Solutions Manual
Harry Nickla, Creighton University (0-13-093338-4)
Completely reviewed and checked for accuracy, this valuable handbook provides a detailed step-by-step solution or extended discussion for every problem in the text in a chapter-by-chapter format. The handbook also contains extra study problems and a thorough review of concepts and vocabulary.

New York Times Themes of the Times: Genetics and Molecular Biology
Coordinated by Furry Nickla, Creighton University (0-13-060462-3)
This exciting newspaper-format supplement brings together recent genetics and molecular biology articles from the pages of the highly respected New York Times. This free supplement, available through your local representative, encourages students to make the connections between genetic concepts and the latest research and breakthroughs in the field. This resource is updated regularly.

Science on the Internet: A Student's Guide
Andrew Stull and Harry Nickla (0-13-028253-7)
The perfect guide to help your students take advantage of explosion of our Essentials of Genetics home page on the World Wide Web. This resource gives clear steps to access our regularly updated genetics resource area as well as an overview of general navigation and research strategies.

For the Instructor

Instructor's CD-ROM (0-13-065850-2)
For Essentials adopters, this CD-ROM is partitioned into sections that contain

  • All figures from the text
  • PowerPoint (TM) format for figures
  • The complete Instructor's Manual

Instructors will be able to coordinate lectures presentations with text content knowing students will be studying using the same animations, based upon the text. No more searching for the Instructor's Manual—It's on the CD-ROM.

Instructor's Resource Manual with Testbank
This manual and test bank contains over 800 questions and problems an instructor can use to prepare exams. The manual also provides optional course sequences, a guide to audiovisual supplements, and a section on searching the web. The testbank portion of the manual is also available in electronic format for both Windows and Macintosh users. Prentice Hall Custom Test allows instructors to create and tailor exams to their own needs. With the Online Testing option, exams can also be administered online and data can then be automatically transferred for evaluation. A comprehensive desk reference guide is included, along with online assistance.

Transparencies
200 figures from the text are included in the transparency package: 150 four-color transparencies from the text plus 50 transparency masters. The font size of the labels has been increased for easy viewing from the back of the classroom.

WebCT Course for Essentials of Genetics, 4th edition
The Prentice Hall WebCT course content for Essentials helps you meet the challenge of creating robust, interactive and educationally rich online courses. Our WebCT course material provides you with high quality, class-tested material pre-programmed and fully functional in the WebCT environment. Whether used as an online supplement to either a campus-based or distance learning course, our pre-assembled course content gives you a tremendous head start in developing your own online courses.

Blackboard Course for Essentials of Genetics, 4th edition
The Essentials Blackboard course contains web-based content and resources such as online study guides, assessment databanks, and lecture resource material. The abundant online content from Essentials, combined with Blackboard's popular tools and easy-to-use interface, result in a robust web-based course that is easy to implement, manage, and use—taking your courses to new heights in student interaction and learning. The Blackboard course management solution enable you to quickly add an online component to your campus-based course to provide you with a sophisticated technology base for total customization, scalability, and integration into your distance learning course.

CourseCompass Course for Essentials of Genetics, 4th edition
The Essentials CourseCompass™ course is the perfect course management solution that combines quality content with state-of-the-art Blackboard technology! CourseCompass™ is a dynamic, interactive online course management tool powered by Blackboard but hosted by Pearson Education. This exciting product allows you to teach with market-leading Essentials content in an easy-to-use customizable format.

Acknowledgments

All comprehensive texts are dependent on the valuable input provided by many reviewers and colleagues. While we take full responsibility for any errors in this book, we gratefully acknowledge the help provided by those individuals who reviewed or otherwise contributed to the content and pedagogy of this and previous editions.

In particular, we thank Sarah Ward at Colorado State University for creating Chapter 24-Conservation Genetics and Jon Herron at the University of Washington for his input into Chapter 22-Population Genetics and Chapter 23-Genetics and Evolution. As in past editions, Charlotte Spencer at the Cross Cancer Institute in Alberta wrote or revised most of the Genetics, Technology, and Society essays. Others essays were previously contributed by Mark Shotwell at Slippery Rock University.

Robert W. Adkinson, Louisiana State University
Janice Bossart, The College of New Jersey
Paul Bottino, University of Maryland
Jim Bricker, The College of New Jersey
Hugh Britten, University of South Dakota
Aaron Cassill, University of Texas, San Antonio
Jimmy D. Clark, University of Kentucky
Stephen J. DSurney, University of Mississippi
Scott Erdman, Syracuse University
Nancy H. Ferguson, Clemson University
Kim Gaither, Oklahoma Christian Univeristy
David Galbreath, McMaster University
Derek J. Girman, Sonoma State University
Elliot Goldstein, Arizona State University
Mark L. Hammond, Campbell University
Mike Hoopman, The College of New Jersey
David Hoppe, University of Minnesota, Morris
John A. Hunt, University of Hawaii, Honolulu
David Kass, Eastern Michigan University
Arlene Larson, University of Colorado at Denver
Beth A. Krueger, Monroe Community College
Hsiu-Ping Liu, Southwest Missouri State University
Paul F. Lurquin, Washington State University
Sally Mackenzie, University of Nebraska
Terry C. Matthews, Millikan University
Cynthia Moore, Washington University
Janet Morrison, The College of New Jersey
Michelle A. Murphy, University of Notre Dame
Marcia L. OConnell, The College of New Jersey
Malcolm Schug, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Ralph Seelke, University of Wisconsin, Superior
Gurel S. Sidhu, California State University
Gerald Schlink, Missouri Southern State College
Randy Scholl, Ohio State University
Mark Sturtevant, Northern Arizona University
Christine Tachibana, University of Washington
R. C. Woodruff, Bowling Green State University
Marie Wooten, Auburn University

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 An Introduction to Genetics 1
2 Mitosis and Meiosis 15
3 Mendelian Genetics 36
4 Modification of Mendelian Ratios 58
5 Sex Determination and Sex Chromosomes 83
6 Quantitative Genetics 102
7 Chromosome Mutations: Variation in Number and Arrangement 120
8 Linkage and Chromosome Mapping in Eukaryotes 141
9 Mapping in Bacteria and Bacteriophages 166
10 DNA Structure and Analysis 187
11 DNA Replication and Synthesis 212
12 The Genetic Code and Transcription 232
13 Translation and Proteins 253
14 Gene Mutation, DNA Repair, and Transposable Elements 278
15 Regulation of Gene Expression 306
16 Recombinant DNA Technology 326
17 Chromosome Structure and DNA Sequence Organization 348
18 Genomics and Proteomics 365
19 Biotechnology and Its Implications for Society 392
20 Genes and Development 415
21 The Genetic Basis of Cancer 431
22 Population Genetics 450
23 Genetics and Evolution 472
24 Conservation Genetics 495
Read More Show Less

Preface

Essentials of Genetics is written for courses requiring a text that is shorter and more basic than its more comprehensive companion, Concepts of Genetics. While coverage is thorough, current, and of high quality, Essentials is written to be more accessible to biology majors early in their undergraduate careers, as well as by a mixture of students majoring in agriculture, forestry, wildlife management, chemistry, psychology, and so on. Because the text is shorter than many other books, Essentials of Genetics will be more manageable in one-quarter and one-semester courses.

Goals

Although Essentials of Genetics is almost 300 pages shorter than its companion volume, our goals are the same for both books. Specifically, we seek to

  • Emphasize concepts rather than excessive detail
  • Write clearly and directly to students in order to provide understandable explanations of complex, analytical topics
  • Establish a careful organization within and between chapters
  • Maintain constant emphasis on scientific analysis as the means to illustrate how we know what we know
  • Propagate the rich history of genetics that so beautifully illustrates how information is acquired and extended within the discipline as it develops and grows
  • Create inviting, engaging, and pedagogically useful full-color figures enhanced by equally helpful photographs to support concept development

These goals serve as the cornerstones of Essentials of Genetics. This pedagogic foundation allows the book to accommodate courses with many different approaches and lecture formats. Chapters are written to be asindependent of one another as possible, allowing instructors to utilize them in various sequences. We believe that the varied approaches embodied in these goals work together to provide students with optimal support for their study of genetics.

Features of the Fourth Edition

  • Online Media Tutorials—Students are guided in their understanding of important concepts by working through what are simply the best animations, tutorial exercises, and self-assessment tools available.
  • Length—Once again we have managed to streamline the text. This new Essentials is 508 pages, 7 pages shorter than the previous edition.
  • Revised Organization—We provide an improved chapter sequence designed to flow smoothly from start to finish, including an early (the first chapter) introduction to DNA as well a cohesive sequence of chapters centering on the genetic role of DNA, its structure, replication, expression, and regulation.
  • New Chapters—Sex Determination and Sex Chromosomes combines new information with parts of chapters from the previous edition; Genomics and Proteomics is a totally new chapter that gives students concepts and tools necessary to understand the information explosion occurring in these fields. The chapter entitled Conservation Genetics represents the first coverage of this emerging discipline in any genetics textbook.
  • Redesign of the Art Program—The pedagogic value, to say nothing of the beautiful execution, of the new art program will be readily apparent to users of the previous edition.
  • Section Numbers—All sections are numbered making it easier to assign topics and for students to find topics within chapters
  • New Photographs—An even greater number of photographs illustrate and enhance this edition.
  • Emerging Topics in Genetics—Coverage of cutting edge topics includes comparative genomics, which analyzes the recently sequenced genomes of a number of organisms, including our own species (Chapter 18); proteomics, which attempts to define the potential role of the genes discovered during the Human Genome Project (Chapter 18); and conservation genetics, which assesses and attempts to maintain genetic diversity in the many endangered species on our planet (Chapter 24).
  • Modernization of Topics—In addition to the areas considered in the section above on emerging topics, modernization is particularly evident in the discussions of recombinant DNA technology (Chapter 16), the organization of repetitive DNA sequences in the human genome (Chapter 17), the role of genetics in the origin of cancer (Chapter 21), and the analysis of HIV infection and resistance in population genetic studies (Chapter 22).
  • New "Genetics, Technology, and Society" Essays—New topics include "Genetically Modified Foods," "DNA At the Millennium," "Completion of the Human Genome Project: The Hype and the Hope," and "Endangered Species: The Florida Panther."
  • Emphasis on Problem Solving—"Insights and Solutions" sections at the ends of chapters guide students in how to think analytically about problems. "Problems and Discussion Questions" have been expanded to offer more opportunity for study.

Emphasis on Concepts

As in its companion volume, Essentials of Genetics continues to emphasize the conceptual framework of genetics. Our experience with this approach shows that students more easily comprehend and take with them to succeeding courses the most important ideas in genetics as well as an analytic view of biological problems. To aid students in identifying conceptual aspects of a major topic, each chapter begins with a section called "Chapter Concepts," which in a few sentences captures the essence of the most important ideas about to be presented. Then, each chapter ends with a "Chapter Summary," which enumerates the five to ten key points that have been covered. These two features help to ensure that students focus on concepts and are not distracted by the many, albeit important, details of genetics. Specific examples and carefully designed figures support this approach throughout the book.

Insights and Solutions

Genetics, more than any other discipline within biology, requires problem solving and analytical thinking. At the end of each chapter we include what has become an extremely popular and successful section called "Insights and Solutions." In this section we stress:

• Problem solving
• Quantitative analysis
• Analytical thinking
• Experimental rationale

Problems or questions are posed and detailed solutions or answers are provided. This feature primes students for moving on to the "Problems and Discussion Questions" section that concludes each chapter.

Problems and Discussion Questions

In order to optimize the opportunities for student growth in the important areas of problem solving and analytical thinking, each chapter concludes with an extensive collection of problems and discussion questions. These represent various levels of difficulty, with the most challenging problems located at the end of each section. Brief answers to half the problems are in Appendix A. The Student Handbook is available to students for faculty who wish to expose their students to detailed answers to all problems and questions.

For the Student

Online Media Tutorials (New)
The most sophisticated learning and tutorial package available for students of genetics, this online tutorial support system addresses students' most difficult concepts as identified through a survey of instructors. Concepts and processes begin with an overview that usually includes animations, proceeds to one or a series of interactive exercises, followed by self quizzes. Each chapter contains a glossary, help function, search function, web links to fascinating and useful web sites, plus additional problem-solving questions. Students who experience difficulty with exercises or quizzes will be directed to specific sections of the text for review. An online demonstration of these amazing tutorials can be found at http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/genetics_demo

The following topics are addressed in the interactive media tutorials:

  • Mitosis
  • Meiosis
  • Segregation
  • Monohybrid Cross
  • Independent Assortment
  • Meiosis and Mendel
  • Extensions of Mendelian Inheritance: codominance, incomplete dominance, multiple alleles, gene interaction
  • Probability: simple probability, sum rule, product rule, binomial probability
  • Sex-Linked Inheritance: X-linked, Y -linked
  • Linkage and Recombinantion: linkage versus independent assortment
  • Linked Genes: mapping linked genes, construction of linkage maps
  • Mapping a Three-Point Cross: includes calculation of recombination frequency, interference
  • Virtual Crossover Laboratory
  • Chromosome Aberrations: overview, inversions, translocations, deletions, duplications
  • Phage Genetics: life cycle (lytic, lysogenic) phage cross, phage complementation
  • Bacterial Genetics: transformation, conjugation
  • DNA Structure: helix, components (sugar, base, phosphate), nucleotides
  • DNA Replication: components, bidirectional replication, fork formation
  • DNA Recombination (steps, structures)
  • Transcription: components, initiation, elongation, termination, genetic code, Prokaryotes versus eukaryotes
  • Translation: initiation, elongation, termination, prokaryotes versus eukaryotes, summary: DNA to RNA to protein
  • Regulation of Gene Expression: prokaryotes (lac operon)
  • Regulation of Gene Expression: eukaryotes: transcriptional regulation, alternative splicing, translational, posttranslational control
  • Mutation: gene/protein colinearity, effect on protein structure (hemoglobin)
  • Mutation at the DNA Level: nucleotide substitution, frameshift mutations
  • DNA Repair
  • Recombinant DNA Technology: restriction enzymes, cloning in plasmid vector, selection
  • PCR: mechanism, uses
  • Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms: codominant trait, transmission, linkage to disease loci
  • DNA Fingerprinting
  • Chromatin, Chromosome Structure: nucleosomes, fibers, scaffolding, isochores
  • Population Genetics: allele frequencies, Hardy-Weinberg, selection
  • Analysis of Human Pedigrees: autosomal dominant, recessive, X-linked dominant, recessive, mitochondrial
  • Nondisjunction: normal, meiosis 1, meiosis II gamete formation, fertilization outcomes
  • Chemical Mutagenesis, Ames Test
  • Restriction Mapping

Student Handbook and Solutions Manual
Harry Nickla, Creighton University (0-13-093338-4)
Completely reviewed and checked for accuracy, this valuable handbook provides a detailed step-by-step solution or extended discussion for every problem in the text in a chapter-by-chapter format. The handbook also contains extra study problems and a thorough review of concepts and vocabulary.

New York Times Themes of the Times: Genetics and Molecular Biology
Coordinated by Furry Nickla, Creighton University (0-13-060462-3)
This exciting newspaper-format supplement brings together recent genetics and molecular biology articles from the pages of the highly respected New York Times. This free supplement, available through your local representative, encourages students to make the connections between genetic concepts and the latest research and breakthroughs in the field. This resource is updated regularly.

Science on the Internet: A Student's Guide
Andrew Stull and Harry Nickla (0-13-028253-7)
The perfect guide to help your students take advantage of explosion of our Essentials of Genetics home page on the World Wide Web. This resource gives clear steps to access our regularly updated genetics resource area as well as an overview of general navigation and research strategies.

For the Instructor

Instructor's CD-ROM (0-13-065850-2)
For Essentials adopters, this CD-ROM is partitioned into sections that contain

  • All figures from the text
  • PowerPoint (TM) format for figures
  • The complete Instructor's Manual

Instructors will be able to coordinate lectures presentations with text content knowing students will be studying using the same animations, based upon the text. No more searching for the Instructor's Manual—It's on the CD-ROM.

Instructor's Resource Manual with Testbank
This manual and test bank contains over 800 questions and problems an instructor can use to prepare exams. The manual also provides optional course sequences, a guide to audiovisual supplements, and a section on searching the web. The testbank portion of the manual is also available in electronic format for both Windows and Macintosh users. Prentice Hall Custom Test allows instructors to create and tailor exams to their own needs. With the Online Testing option, exams can also be administered online and data can then be automatically transferred for evaluation. A comprehensive desk reference guide is included, along with online assistance.

Transparencies
200 figures from the text are included in the transparency package: 150 four-color transparencies from the text plus 50 transparency masters. The font size of the labels has been increased for easy viewing from the back of the classroom.

WebCT Course for Essentials of Genetics, 4th edition
The Prentice Hall WebCT course content for Essentials helps you meet the challenge of creating robust, interactive and educationally rich online courses. Our WebCT course material provides you with high quality, class-tested material pre-programmed and fully functional in the WebCT environment. Whether used as an online supplement to either a campus-based or distance learning course, our pre-assembled course content gives you a tremendous head start in developing your own online courses.

Blackboard Course for Essentials of Genetics, 4th edition
The Essentials Blackboard course contains web-based content and resources such as online study guides, assessment databanks, and lecture resource material. The abundant online content from Essentials, combined with Blackboard's popular tools and easy-to-use interface, result in a robust web-based course that is easy to implement, manage, and use—taking your courses to new heights in student interaction and learning. The Blackboard course management solution enable you to quickly add an online component to your campus-based course to provide you with a sophisticated technology base for total customization, scalability, and integration into your distance learning course.

CourseCompass Course for Essentials of Genetics, 4th edition
The Essentials CourseCompass™ course is the perfect course management solution that combines quality content with state-of-the-art Blackboard technology! CourseCompass™ is a dynamic, interactive online course management tool powered by Blackboard but hosted by Pearson Education. This exciting product allows you to teach with market-leading Essentials content in an easy-to-use customizable format.

Acknowledgments

All comprehensive texts are dependent on the valuable input provided by many reviewers and colleagues. While we take full responsibility for any errors in this book, we gratefully acknowledge the help provided by those individuals who reviewed or otherwise contributed to the content and pedagogy of this and previous editions.

In particular, we thank Sarah Ward at Colorado State University for creating Chapter 24-Conservation Genetics and Jon Herron at the University of Washington for his input into Chapter 22-Population Genetics and Chapter 23-Genetics and Evolution. As in past editions, Charlotte Spencer at the Cross Cancer Institute in Alberta wrote or revised most of the Genetics, Technology, and Society essays. Others essays were previously contributed by Mark Shotwell at Slippery Rock University.

Robert W. Adkinson, Louisiana State University
Janice Bossart, The College of New Jersey
Paul Bottino, University of Maryland
Jim Bricker, The College of New Jersey
Hugh Britten, University of South Dakota
Aaron Cassill, University of Texas, San Antonio
Jimmy D. Clark, University of Kentucky
Stephen J. DSurney, University of Mississippi
Scott Erdman, Syracuse University
Nancy H. Ferguson, Clemson University
Kim Gaither, Oklahoma Christian Univeristy
David Galbreath, McMaster University
Derek J. Girman, Sonoma State University
Elliot Goldstein, Arizona State University
Mark L. Hammond, Campbell University
Mike Hoopman, The College of New Jersey
David Hoppe, University of Minnesota, Morris
John A. Hunt, University of Hawaii, Honolulu
David Kass, Eastern Michigan University
Arlene Larson, University of Colorado at Denver
Beth A. Krueger, Monroe Community College
Hsiu-Ping Liu, Southwest Missouri State University
Paul F. Lurquin, Washington State University
Sally Mackenzie, University of Nebraska
Terry C. Matthews, Millikan University
Cynthia Moore, Washington University
Janet Morrison, The College of New Jersey
Michelle A. Murphy, University of Notre Dame
Marcia L. OConnell, The College of New Jersey
Malcolm Schug, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Ralph Seelke, University of Wisconsin, Superior
Gurel S. Sidhu, California State University
Gerald Schlink, Missouri Southern State College
Randy Scholl, Ohio State University
Mark Sturtevant, Northern Arizona University
Christine Tachibana, University of Washington
R. C. Woodruff, Bowling Green State University
Marie Wooten, Auburn University

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)