Essentials Of Milk Hygiene

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PART IV. PASTEURIZATION AND STERILIZATION In the household, milk is boiled to make it keep longer and this process serves also to kill any pathogenic bacteria that may be present. Little by little, the public has learned that milk...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
PART IV. PASTEURIZATION AND STERILIZATION In the household, milk is boiled to make it keep longer and this process serves also to kill any pathogenic bacteria that may be present. Little by little, the public has learned that milk often contains disease producing germs and that small children are especially exposed to their harmful effects, so the custom has become more or less general of sterilizing milk intended for infants. Quite naturally, the idea developed to sterilize market milk, by heating before it was offered for sale. By this means, the following desired results have been obtained: the milk keeps for a longer time, it loses its capacity for infection, and the annoying process of sterilization in the home is avoided. In most large cities there are one or more companies engaged hi the sale of sterilized or pasteurized milk. The difference between pasteurization and sterilization consists, essentially, in the greater degree of heat applied during the latter process. I. PASTEURIZATION By pasteurizing a fluid is generally understood heating it to a temperature below boiling which is sufficient to increase its keeping qualities. It is sometimes used to indicate heating to 50 to 60 C. (122 to 140 F.) and sometimes the use of a higher temperature. In reference to milk and dairy products, the term "pasteurization" is used in a more definite sense. In butter- making pasteurization is understood to mean a brief heating of the cream and whole milk to 80 to 85 C. (176 to 185 F.), the purpose of which is to kill most of the existing bacteria, in order to prevent those fermentations of the cream which might cause the butter to be of inferior quality. At the same time, pathogenic micro-organisms (particularly tubercle bacilli) are made harmless. In some places,'' pas...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781165452392
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 9/10/2010
  • Pages: 282
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.75 (d)

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PART IV. PASTEURIZATION AND STERILIZATION In the household, milk is boiled to make it keep longer and this process serves also to kill any pathogenic bacteria that may be present. Little by little, the public has learned that milk often contains disease producing germs and that small children are especially exposed to their harmful effects, so the custom has become more or less general of sterilizing milk intended for infants. Quite naturally, the idea developed to sterilize market milk, by heating before it was offered for sale. By this means, the following desired results have been obtained: the milk keeps for a longer time, it loses its capacity for infection, and the annoying process of sterilization in the home is avoided. In most large cities there are one or more companies engaged hi the sale of sterilized or pasteurized milk. The difference between pasteurization and sterilization consists, essentially, in the greater degree of heat applied during the latter process. I. PASTEURIZATION By pasteurizing a fluid is generally understood heating it to a temperature below boiling which is sufficient to increase its keeping qualities. It is sometimes used to indicate heating to 50 to 60 C. (122 to 140 F.) and sometimes the use of a higher temperature. In reference to milk and dairy products, the term "pasteurization" is used in a more definite sense. In butter- making pasteurization is understood to mean a brief heating of the cream and whole milk to 80 to 85 C. (176 to 185 F.), the purpose of which is to kill most of the existing bacteria, in order to prevent those fermentations of the cream which might cause the butter to be of inferior quality. At the same time, pathogenicmicro-organisms (particularly tubercle bacilli) are made harmless. In some places,'' pas...
Read More Show Less

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