Essentials of Neo-Confucianism: Eight Major Philosophers of the Song and Ming Periods by Siu-Chi Huang, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Essentials of Neo-Confucianism: Eight Major Philosophers of the Song and Ming Periods

Essentials of Neo-Confucianism: Eight Major Philosophers of the Song and Ming Periods

by Siu-Chi Huang
     
 

Huang's book analyzes the major Neo-Confucian philosophers from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries. Focusing on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical philosophical issues, this study presents the historical development of the Neo-Confucian school, an outgrowth of ancient Confucianism, and characterizes its thought, background, and influence. Key concepts&

Overview

Huang's book analyzes the major Neo-Confucian philosophers from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries. Focusing on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical philosophical issues, this study presents the historical development of the Neo-Confucian school, an outgrowth of ancient Confucianism, and characterizes its thought, background, and influence. Key concepts—for example tai-ji (supreme ultimate), xin (mind), and ren (humanity)—as interpreted by each thinker are discussed in detail. Also examined are the two major schools that developed during this period, Cheng-Zhu, School of Principle, and Lu-Wang, School of Mind. These schools, despite different philosophical orientations, were convinced that their common goal, to bring about a harmonious relationships between man and the universe and between man and man, could be achieved through different ways of philosophizing. To understand the Chinese mind, it is necessary to understand Neo-Confucianism as a reformation of early Confucianism.

This analytical presentation of major Neo-Confucian philosophers, from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries, examines Zhou Dun-yi (1017-1073), Shao Yong (1011-1077), Zhang Zai (1020-1077), Cheng Hao (1032-1085), Cheng Yi (1033-1107), Zhu Xi (1130-1200), Lu Xiang-shan (1139-1193), and Wang Yang-ming (1427-1529). With its focus on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical philosophical issues, Huang's study presents the historical development of the Neo-Confucian school, an outgrowth of ancient Confucianism, and characterizes its thought, background, and influence. Key concepts—for example, tai-ji (supreme ultimate), xin (mind), and ren (humanity)—as interpreted by each thinker are discussed in detail. The two major schools that developed during these six centuries are examined as well. Lu-Wang, School of Mind, developed in criticism of Cheng-Zhu, School of Principle. The two schools, despite different approaches toward their philosophical pursuits, were convinced that their common goals, to bring about harmonious relationships between man and the universe and between man and man, could be achieved through different ways of philosophizing. To understand the Chinese mind, it is necessary to understand Neo-Confucianism as a reformation of early Confucianism.

Scholars of Eastern religions and philosophy will appreciate the objective interpretations of each thinker's philosophy, for which pertinent passages spoken by each man have been selected and translated by the author from the original Chinese, and the comparisons of the Neo-Confucian philosophies with those of the West. An introduction provides the historical background in which to study the rise of Neo-Confucianism. The study is organized ehronologically and includes a glossary of terms and a bibliography which serves as a helpful guide for further research.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The student and general reader will find this a ready-reference." - American Reference Books Annual

"This text makes an excellent source- and reference-book, both for the student of Chinese culture as well as for those interested in general themes of philosophy, metaphysics, and ethics." - Journal of Church and State

Booknews
Huang (philosophy, Beaver College, Pennsylvania) characterize the Song (260-1279) and Ming (1368-1643) dynasties as the greatest creative period in Chinese philosophy since the Zhou a thousand years before, but different from the earlier period because Neo-Confucianism dominated rather than Confucianism being one of a hundred schools of thought. She profiles eight thinkers who have been widely recognized for their contributions to the formulation, development, culmination, and finally orthodoxy of the philosophy. She gives little attention to the historical, political, or social background. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780313264498
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/30/1999
Series:
Resources in Asian Philosophy and Religion Series
Pages:
278
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.69(d)
Lexile:
1450L (what's this?)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Siu-chi Huang is professor emerita of philosophy and former department chair of Beaver College in Pennsylvania. She received her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and an honorary doctorate of letters from Beaver College. In addition to being a former visiting professor at the University of Hawaii, Xiamen (Amoy) University, and Fudan University (Shanghai), Dr. Huang is also the author of Lu Hsiang-shan: A Twelfth Century Idealist Philosopher (1944) and Zhang Zai (1987). Works Dr. Huang has translated include George Berkeley's Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous and Josiah Royce's Sources of Religious Insight.

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