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The Etcher's Studio
     

The Etcher's Studio

by Arthur Geisert
 

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In telling the story of a young boy who helps his grandfather, an etcher, prepare for a year-end studio print sale, Arthur Geisert describes the etching process, while his colorful illustrations demonstrate the elegance and beauty of this unique art form. "Creating an enthralling parallel, Geisert illustrates this story of the intricate goings-on in an etcher's studio

Overview

In telling the story of a young boy who helps his grandfather, an etcher, prepare for a year-end studio print sale, Arthur Geisert describes the etching process, while his colorful illustrations demonstrate the elegance and beauty of this unique art form. "Creating an enthralling parallel, Geisert illustrates this story of the intricate goings-on in an etcher's studio with the stylish, full-color etchings that have earned him accolades." -- Publishers Weekly, starred review

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
"Creating an enthralling parallel, Geisert illustrates this story of the intricate goings-on in an etcher's studio with the stylish, full-color etchings that have earned him accolades," wrote PW in a starred review. Ages 4-8. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Creating an enthralling parallel, Geisert (Oink; Pigs from 1 to 10) illustrates this story of the intricate goings-on in an etcher's studio with the stylish, full-color etchings that have earned him accolades. Step by careful step, a boy helps his grandfather prepare for the annual sale of prints made from his etchings. After Grandfather soaks the paper in water, inks the copper plate and rolls it through the press, the boy's real work beginshe colors each print by hand. This soon proves tiresome, and the boy daydreams of exploring the exotic placesthe jungle, the oceandepicted in the prints. Luckily his wandering mind doesn't prevent him from filling the studio with a bounty of artwork ready for sale. Geisert's portrait of an involving intergenerational relationship is warm and welcome. As the story's narrator, the boy balances a certain maturity and respect for his grandfather's work with typical kidlike thoughts and reactions. Readers are also rewarded with a bit of an education: Geisert provides a precisely labeled illustration of an etcher's studio, as well as a detailed spread explaining, in stages, how an etching is made. Geisert fans will also enjoy spotting scenes from his previous books scattered around Grandfather's studioand, not surprisingly, the etching on the how-to pages is of a pig. All ages. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Kathleen Karr
Geisert's lesson in the etching process should prove a fascinating book for budding young artists as well as for kids interested in how things are done. A boy who is helping out in his grandfather's etching studio narrates the story. First the prints are made, then as the boy hand-colors them, he lets his mind roam into the scenes before him: sailing around the Horn; deep sea diving; flying aloft in a balloon. There are animals aplenty, and lots of Geisert's trademark pigs, too. The closing section, which describes the step-by-step process of etching, should be useful to art teachers as well.
Children's Literature - Beverly Kobrin
Etcher/author Arthur Geisert, whose plentiful pigs populate the pages of Roman Numerals I to MM, explains the craft of his art in The Etcher's Studio. He tells the story of a young boy who helps his etcher/grandfather prepare for a year-end sale. A reprise of the technique, from blank copper plate to the hand-colored, third proof, concludes this inspired blend of fact and fiction.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-8Watercolor, crayon, and color pencil are mediums children can relate to easily; the complex work of etching is more challenging. Here, Geisert takes away the mystery as he transports young readers to an etcher's studio and provides step-by-step explanations of this age-old art technique. In a thin gesture to story, an unnamed narrator helps his grandfather prepare for a year-end studio print sale. However, as the boy undertakes his most important task (hand coloring the images), his mind begins to stray and soon he is inside the picturessailing around Cape Horn, flying over his hometown in a hot air balloon, changing places with a deep-sea diver, and exploring a jungle. While the working relationship between the boy and his grandfather is a nice touch, the youngster's imaginative wanderings go nowhere; suddenly he is back in the studio with the dramatic possibilities never realized. Nevertheless, there is much to share with children. The work of an etcher is skillfully divulged, two well-labeled appended spreads (a panoramic view of the studio, and, in storyboard fashion, the processes of making an etching) give breadth to the presentation, and a short afterword capsulizes the history of the art. In addition, the pages reveal cues to other Geisert books. This selection balances the many books on other art techniques, such as the "DK Art School" series or Douglas Florian's A Painter (Greenwillow, 1993), and, of course, makes an excellent introduction to Geisert's own esteemed creations.Barbara Elleman, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
From the Publisher

"Creating an enthralling parallel, Geisert illustrates this story of the intricate goings-on in an etcher's studio with the stylish, full-color etchings that have earned him accolades." Publishers Weekly, Starred

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618556144
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
05/28/2005
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.81(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Arthur Geisert’s unique and exquisite etchings have been widely praised and exhibited at the Chicago Institute of Art, among other museums. His work is regularly selected for the Society of Illustrators’, annual Original Art exhibition, and his illustrations are now being collected by the Dubuque Museum of Art. He lives in a converted bank in Bernard, Iowa.

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