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Eternal Echoes [NOOK Book]

Overview

There is a divine restlessness in the human heart, our eternal echo of longing that lives deep within us and never lets us settle for what we have or where we are.In this exquisitely crafted and inspirational book, John O'Donohue, author of the bestseller Anam Cara, explores the most basic of human desires - the desire to belong, a desire that constantly draws us toward new possibilities of self-discovery, friendship, and creativity.

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Eternal Echoes

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Overview

There is a divine restlessness in the human heart, our eternal echo of longing that lives deep within us and never lets us settle for what we have or where we are.In this exquisitely crafted and inspirational book, John O'Donohue, author of the bestseller Anam Cara, explores the most basic of human desires - the desire to belong, a desire that constantly draws us toward new possibilities of self-discovery, friendship, and creativity.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Following his popular Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom, O'Donohue offers a soaring, eloquent meditation on the art of living. In most people, he maintains, an innate, deep-seated hunger for belonging and relatedness is frustrated by our high-pressured, isolating consumerist culture. Distilling guideposts of Celtic spirituality from traditional Irish legends, fairy lore, lyric poetry and Druidic nature-worship, he also tosses into the pot some Zen Buddhism, Jewish mysticism and quotes from Simone Weil, Nietzsche, Yeats, Auden, Neruda, Merleau-Ponty and Romanian philosopher E.M. Cioran. O'Donohue invites readers to make their lives a constant pilgrimage of discovery. This, he says, involves freeing oneself from the mental prisons of guilt, rigid belief and self-punishment; learning to embrace one's individuality; and coming to terms with the loss, absence or death of loved ones. Though the writing occasionally gets syrupy, this intense, concentrated inquiry towers above most self-help or New Age fare. It includes pertinent commentary not only on addiction, parenting and music but also on the lure of cults and the resurgence of political tribalism, whether in Northern Ireland, Yugoslavia or Russia. A Catholic scholar who lives by a lake in Ireland, O'Donohue has produced a treasury for readers of all faiths--a demanding, high-wire existentialist adventure that will inspire readers to re-evaluate their goals and ways of being in the world. O'Donohue ends each chapter with a lyrical blessing or prayer, and his book itself is a profound, healing prayer. Agent, Kim Witherspoon. (Mar.)
Library Journal
A follow-up to Anam Cara, an exploration of Celtic spirituality.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061853272
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 612,266
  • File size: 712 KB

Meet the Author

John O'Donohue was awarded a Ph.D. in philosophical theology from the University of Tübingen in 1990. He is the author of several works, including a book on the philosophy of Hegel, Person als Vermittlung; two collections of poetry, Echoes of Memory and Conamara Blues; and two international bestsellers, Anam Cara and Eternal Echoes. He lectures and holds workshops in Europe and America, and is currently researching a book on the philosophical mysticism of Meister Eckhart. He lives in Ireland.

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Read an Excerpt

"While we are here, where is it that we are absent from?"
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Prologue
1 Awakening in the World: The Threshold of Belonging 1
2 Presence: The Flame of Longing 51
3 Prisons We Choose to Live In 98
4 Suffering as the Dark Valley of Broken Belonging 144
5 Prayer: A Bridge Between Longing and Belonging 184
6 Absence: Where Longing Still Lingers 222
Suggested Further Reading 273
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2000

    Modern Take on an Ancient Problem

    Stylistically speaking, John O¿Donohue is almost Hemingwayesque, often stringing together brief, pithy declarative sentences. Taken out of context, savored separately they are terse bits of Irish wisdom ('The heart is an eternal nomad.' 'The child and the artist are pilgrims of discovery.' 'Suffering is the sister of future possibility.'). One is tempted to plaster them about as reminders of positive, focused aspirations. Yet he is also capable of soaring, poetic passages as well. O¿Donohue incites/ invites us to look for the higher versions of our humanity by pointing out various current attitudes which have led society to a leprosy of spirit. He reminds us that our normally healthy desire for satiation had mutated to obsessive consumerism. ('Consumerism is the new religion . . . Quantity is the new divinity . . . Advertising is its liturgy.') This may fuel the world economy but it does so at the cost of emptying our souls. He further suggests that the technology which promised to make us belong has only isolated us and severed our ties to nature. And that in losing our respect for the earth we are destroying ourselves in ways that transcend the mere poisoning of the environment. The author is described on the book¿s back cover as 'a Catholic scholar.' Followers of other religions should not be put-off by this. O¿Donohue obviously possesses profound, definitive ideas about his own faith, but he does not 'inflict' them with undue pressure upon the reader. In an effort to locate something to criticize in this book, I must say that I read lightly and quickly a short segment on Celtic spirituality relating to the fairy world. As a cynical, twentieth century American, I am discomforted by suggestions of unseen presences from an 'in-between world.' It seems too convenient a means of explaining the unexplainable: those seemingly bizarre twists of Fate to which each of us is subjected. (In an effort to maintain some flexibility in this matter, I have relegated it to a personal mental subheading entitled, 'More things in heaven and earth, Horatio . . .') There are passages in Eternal Echoes that I would be hard-pressed to reword and explain. Yet on some level they click. I might suggest this as a kind of epiphany where the intellect recognizes the spiritual and vice versa. The power of words often rests in their very subjectivity --- that what we derive from them may not be precisely what the author intended, but nonetheless a mind-door has opened. John O¿Donohue leads us to such thresholds, then suggests what he believes may lie beyond. It is for us to step through these portals and explore the potential of our own inner scenery.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2011

    Inciteful and illuminating.

    As a disillusioned "cradle" Catholic, I find the Celtic view, as related by O'Donohue, a path in the right direction on my continued spiritual journey. After reading Anam Cara by the same author, I just had to read more! This book continues an exploration and answers many questions that I have had from my traditional religious teachings.The feminine side of the equation is addressed where the formal Church never entered or seemed to accept. This need to belong is referenced from an enlightening point of view.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 2, 2013

    One of the best by John O'Donohue

    Another great one to add peace to your life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2012

    Great Read

    Full of inspirition & hope.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2009

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    Posted October 19, 2011

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    Posted June 29, 2014

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    Posted September 9, 2010

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    Posted September 5, 2010

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