Ethical Theory: Classical and Contemporary Readings / Edition 6

Ethical Theory: Classical and Contemporary Readings / Edition 6

by Louis P. Pojman
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0495808776

ISBN-13: 9780495808770

Pub. Date: 02/01/2010

Publisher: Cengage Learning

This authoritative and reader-friendly anthology will help you think through some of humanity's most persistent questions regarding right and wrong, good and bad. ETHICAL THEORY: CLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY READINGS cuts through the confusion and delivers a clear and comprehensive selection of readings from classical and contemporary sources. Presented in a

Overview

This authoritative and reader-friendly anthology will help you think through some of humanity's most persistent questions regarding right and wrong, good and bad. ETHICAL THEORY: CLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY READINGS cuts through the confusion and delivers a clear and comprehensive selection of readings from classical and contemporary sources. Presented in a dynamic pro and con format, with detailed summaries of each argument, this comprehensive anthology allows you to watch the ethical debate unfold before your eyes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780495808770
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Publication date:
02/01/2010
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
704
Sales rank:
186,588
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.20(d)

Table of Contents

Preface to the Sixth Edition Part I: WHAT IS ETHICS? Plato: Socratic Morality: Crito. Part II: ETHICAL RELATIVISM VERSUS ETHICAL OBJECTIVISM. 1. Herodotus: Custom is King. 2. Plato: Objective Moral Forms. 3. Thomas Aquinas: Objectivism: Natural Law. 4. Ruth Benedict: A Defense of Ethical Relativism. 5. Louis Pojman: A Critique of Ethical Relativism. 6. Gilbert Harman: Moral Relativism Defended. Part III: MORALITY AND SELF-INTEREST. 1. Joseph Butler: Against Egoism. 2. Joel Feinberg: Psychological Egoism. 3. Plato: Why Be Moral? 4. Richard Taylor: On the Socratic Dilemma. 5. David Gauthier: Morality and Advantage. Part IV: VALUE AND THE SELF. 1. Robert Nozick: The Experience Machine. 2. Richard Taylor: Value and the Origin of Right and Wrong. 3. Friedrich Nietzsche: The Transvaluation of Values. 4. Derek Parfit: What Makes Someone's Life Go Best? 5. Thomas Nagel: Value: The View from Nowhere. 6. Derek Parfit: Later Selves and Moral Principles. 7. Bernard Williams: Persons, Character, and Morality. 8. Carol Gilligan: Women's Conception of Self and of Morality. 9. Sarah Clark Miller: The Need for Care: Gender in Moral Theory. Part V: UTILITARIANISM. 1. Epicurus: Pleasure. 2. Jeremy Bentham: The Utilitarian Calculus. 3. John Stuart Mill: Utilitarianism (complete). 4. J.J.C. Smart: Extreme and Restricted Utilitarianism. 5. Kai Nielsen: Against Moral Conservatism. 6. Bernard Williams: Against Utilitarianism. 7. John Hospers: Rule-Utilitarianism. 8. Robert Nozick: Side Constraints. 9. Peter Singer: Famine, Affluence and Morality. Part VI: KANTIAN AND DEONTOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. 1. Immanuel Kant: The Foundation for the Metaphysics of Morals (complete). 2. W. D. Ross: What Makes Right Acts Right? 3. Onora O''Neill: Kantian Formula of the End in Itself and World Hunger. 4. Thomas Nagel: Moral Luck. 5. Philippa Foot: Morality as a System of Hypothetical Imperatives. 6. Judith Jarvis Thomson: Killing, Letting Die, and the Trolley Problem. Part VII: CONTRACTARIAN ETHICAL SYSTEMS. 1. Thomas Hobbes: The Leviathan. 2. David Gauthier: Why Contractarianism? 3. John Rawls: Contractualism: Justice as Fairness. Part VIII: VIRTUE-BASED ETHICAL SYSTEMS. 1. Aristotle: The Ethics of Virtue (Books 1-4 complete). 2. Bernard Mayo: Virtue and the Moral Life. 3. William Frankena: A Critique of Virtue-Based Ethics. 4. Walter Schaller: Are Virtues No More than Dispositions to Obey Moral Rules? 5. Alasdair MacIntyre: The Nature of the Virtues. 6. Susan Wolf: Moral Saints. 7. Louis P. Pojman: In Defense of Moral Saints. Part IX: THE FACT/VALUE PROBLEM: METAETHICS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. 1. David Hume: On Reason and the Emotions: The Fact/Value Distinction. 2. G. E. Moore: Non-Naturalism. 3. A. J. Ayer: Emotivism. 4. R. M. Hare: Prescriptivism: The Structure of Ethics and Morals. 5. John Searle: How to Derive Ought from Is. 6. Geoffrey Warnock: The Object of Morality. Part X: MORAL REALISM AND THE CHALLENGE OF SKEPTICISM. 1. J.L. Mackie: The Subjectivity of Values. 2. Jonathan Harrison: A Critique of Mackie's Error Theory. 3. Gilbert Harman: Moral Nihilism. 4. Bruce Russell: Two Forms of Ethical Skepticism. Part XI: RELIGION AND ETHICS. 1. Plato: Morality and Religion: Euthyphro. 2. David Hume: Morality Independent from Religion. 3. Immanuel Kant: God and Immortality as Necessary Postulates of Morality. 4. George Mavrodes: Religious and the Queerness of Morality. 5. Kai Nielson: Ethics Without God. Part XII: CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES TO CLASSICAL ETHICAL THEORY. A. Sociobiology and the Question of Moral Responsibility. A.1. Charles Darwin: Ethics and the Descent of Man. A.2. E.O. Wilson: Sociobiology and Ethics. A.3. Michael Ruse: Evolution and Ethics: The Sociobiological Approach. A.4. Elliot Sober: Prospects for an Evolutionary Ethics. A.5. J.L. Mackie: The Law of the Jungle, Evolution and Morality. B. The Challenge of Determinism to Moral Responsibility and Desert. B.1 Louis Pojman: Free Will, Determinism, and Moral Responsibility: A Response to Galen Strawson. B.2 Richard Taylor: A Libertarian Defense of Free Will and Responsibility. A Glossary of Ethical Terms.

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