The Eustace Diamonds

The Eustace Diamonds

3.9 14
by Anthony Trollope
     
 

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In this novel, the characters of Plantagenet Palliser, his wife Lady Glencora and their uncle the ailing Duke of Omnium are in the background. The plot centres on Lizzie Greystock, a fortune-hunter who ensnares the sickly, dissipated Sir Florian Eustace and is soon left a very wealthy widow and mother. While clever and beautiful, Lizzie has several character flaws;

Overview

In this novel, the characters of Plantagenet Palliser, his wife Lady Glencora and their uncle the ailing Duke of Omnium are in the background. The plot centres on Lizzie Greystock, a fortune-hunter who ensnares the sickly, dissipated Sir Florian Eustace and is soon left a very wealthy widow and mother. While clever and beautiful, Lizzie has several character flaws; the greatest of these is an almost pathological delight in lying, even when it cannot benefit her. (Trollope comments that Lizzie sees lies as "more beautiful than the truth.")
This is book #3 of the Palliser series of novels by Anthony Trollope.
Can You Forgive Her
Phineas Finn
The Eustace Diamonds
Phineas Redux
The Prime Minister
The Duke's Children

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013041936
Publisher:
Robin Michell
Publication date:
08/23/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
550 KB

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The Eustace Diamonds 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
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D:
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&diams
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Despite the many wonderful books written by Trollope, I must confess, this is my favorite. It tells a wonderful story in which the reader will find that the characters become as familiar as best friends. Where else is the hero also the villain? A tale of greed, love, honor, loyalty, and morality, don't let the large size discourage you from reading this wonderful book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Besides the evidently historical backdrop, it is hard to imagine that even in the past, the same sort of evil characters are everywhere. The main character, Lizzie, is a hopeless 'goldigger'; proving that the 49er's weren't the only one's back then! :) What modern novels portray today with such ease is considered much more shocking in the past, thougb present all the same. The main character is one that is much more likely to be a villain than anything else, and in its rather abrupt beginning, we learn that she is one to stop at nothing to get what she wants...Even though the plot is either rushed or dragged-out, I think Trollope's character decriptions are what make this book so worth reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Eustace family claims the diamond necklace as a family heirloom. Lizzie Eustace insists that Lord Eustace, her late husband, gave the jewels to her before he died. Upper crust gossip has a grand time disparaging Lizzie because of her foibles. Borrowing a page from Wilkie Collins, the fabulous diamonds are stolen. In the midst of this scandal, three couples do the ritual courtship dance common to 19th century English novels. Lizzie and Lord Fawn are engaged, but loveless. They fear that honor and social expectations will be unduly compromised should their engagement end. Frank Greystock loves the penniless Lucy Morris. He hesitates because he needs money from a rich wife for his career in politics. Lucinda Roanoke and Sir Griffin Tewett use one another as scratching posts in the uncertain quest for Hymeneal bliss. Oh, yes, Lady Glencora and the Pallisers are around as minor characters. The very proper Victorians are too easily betrothed and considerations as wealth and position factor too heavily. Love, alas, is an afterthought. Hence, the unlikely pairings and abrasive relationships. Mr. Trollope has ample opportunity to poke gentle fun. One thing that strikes the modern reader is the very civil discourse between the sparring couples. Gentlemen remain gentlemen, regardless. Even in anger, ladies remain politely restrained. The novel rambles on for almost 800 pages. A leisurely pace was fine for Victorian readers not limited by the time constraints of modern life. The style is finely polished, and the atmosphere is so thoroughly Victorian that the book is a beguiling relic of a past era. Enjoy the opportunity. ;-)