Eva! Leyenda Peruana

Eva! Leyenda Peruana

by Eva Ayllón
     
 

Eva Ayllón has been a marquee name in her native Peru since the 1970s, and this long-awaited introduction to the American market shows exactly why. Allyón brings a potent voice and a passionate attachment to the Afro-Peruvian repertoire. Her jazz-inflected vocals complement a band that plays all around the 6/8 rhythms, with a breathy tear that perfectly communicates… See more details below

Overview

Eva Ayllón has been a marquee name in her native Peru since the 1970s, and this long-awaited introduction to the American market shows exactly why. Allyón brings a potent voice and a passionate attachment to the Afro-Peruvian repertoire. Her jazz-inflected vocals complement a band that plays all around the 6/8 rhythms, with a breathy tear that perfectly communicates the dark origins of the material, most of it born of bitter slavery and racist oppression. Ayllón is also a riveting performer, and brings that stadium-sized emotion to the studio. The uptempo festejos, including the classic "Ingá," also known as "Enciendete candela" are delivered as show-stoppers, even if they only open the album. Fans of Afro-Peruvian music will note that Ayllón presents five valses, a South American variant of the waltz that has little do with the Viennese version beyond its 3/4 time, which is a staple of typical Peruvian show bands. Joining Ayllón are all-stars including the percussionist Rony Campos, who leads the dance ensemble Peru Negro; jazz drummer Alex Acuña, and Los Angeles jazzer Justo Almario, who contributes flute to the landó "La danza clara."

Read More

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - William Ruhlmann
Although Peruvian singer Eva Ayllon has made, by the estimate of annotator Luis Tamargo, over 20 albums since the late '70s, including 2002's Eva, which earned her a Latin Grammy nomination for Best Folk Album, and has toured internationally to a limited extent during that period, she didn't really begin to gain recognition in the U.S. until she appeared on David Byrne's Luaka Bop compilation The Soul of Black Peru, and Eva! Leyenda Peruana is a rare domestic release for her. Happily, it is also a representative one for the singer, whose primary focus on her own country can be explained by her concern for preserving traditional Peruvian dance music. Here, largely employing arrangements dominated by Spanish guitar and African-derived percussion, she presents new and old material in a variety of rhythms, helpfully appending the name of each to the individual song. Thus, the leadoff track, Andrés Soto's "Negra Presuntuosa" ("Presumptuous Black Lady"), José Maria Auguren and Daniel "Kiri" Escobar's "La Danza Clara" ("The Clear Dance"), and Chabuca Granda's "Cardo ó Ceniza" ("Thistle or Ashes") are identified as landós, an Afro-Peruvian genre Tamargo says "aims to propitiate the suggestive pelvic movements of the dancers that once earned condemnation from the country's ruling oligarchs...." Those ruling oligarchs can't have been pleased by the other rhythms Ayllon explores here, either, since they are for the most part similarly blood-stirring. Only toward the end of the album, on tracks produced by Alex Acuña and featuring a different mix of musicians does Ayllon move to more conventional beats, introducing a salsa (with horn parts) on "Cuando Llegue la Hora" ("When the Time Comes") and concluding with a bolero, "Que Somos Amantes" ("We Are Lovers"). No matter the beat pattern, however, it is the singer's throaty and expressive performances that stand out on this striking collection.

Read More

Product Details

Release Date:
09/07/2004
Label:
Times Square Records
UPC:
0738572904029
catalogNumber:
9040

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Negra presentuosa
  2. Ingá
  3. Para que
  4. La danza clara
  5. Raices del festejo / Le dije a Papá
  6. La herida oscura
  7. Cuando llora mi guitarra
  8. Cardo o ceniza
  9. Jolgorio de Eva
  10. Siempre te amaré
  11. Contigo y sin ti
  12. Dolor y odio
  13. Cuando llegue la hora
  14. Que somos amantes

Read More

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Eva Ayllón   Primary Artist
Justo Almario   Flute,Guest Appearance
Gilberto Santa Rosa   Background Vocals
Alex Acuña   Percussion,Drums,Cajon
Sammy Garcia   Conga,Cuira
Gary Herbig   Oboe
Abraham Laboriel   Electric Bass
José Lugo   Piano
Ricardo "Tiki" Pasillas   Chekere,Guest Appearance
Piro Rodriguez   Trumpet,Soloist
Harry Scorzo   Violin
Ramon Stagnaro   Acoustic Guitar
Johnny Torres   Bass
Socky Torres   Background Vocals
Richie Bastar   Bongos
Jorge Diaz   Trombone
Jan Duclerc   Trumpet
Joe Rotondi   Piano
Antonio Vazquez   Trombone
Alan Mautner   Cello
Pablo Padin   Timbales
Roberto Campos   Bongos,Conga,Cajon,cowbell,Bata Drums,Quijada
Joseph Fonseca   Background Vocals
Robin Cecil   Violin
César Silva   Accordion
Sofía Buitron   Background Vocals
Tito Manrique   Guitar
Cesar Peredo   Flute
Rosa Ayllon   Background Vocals
Maria Elena Pacheco   Violin

Technical Credits

Chabuca Granda   Composer
Alex Acuña   Producer
José Lugo   Arranger,Producer
Harry Scorzo   Arranger
Luis Tamargo   Liner Notes
Rolando Alejandro   Engineer
Andres Soto   Composer
José Escajadillo   Composer
Daniel Escobar   Composer
Roberto Campos   Contributor
Eva Ayllón   Executive Producer
German Villacorta   Engineer,Mastering
Traditional   Composer
Augusto Polo Campos   Composer
Juan Morillo   Producer,Executive Producer
Madhukar "Madooo" Dhas   Art Direction

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >