Evaluating Strategy: New Directions for Evaluation, Number 128

Overview

Strategy has emerged as a watchword of modern change efforts. Callsto be strategic are sounded in the private sector,government, philanthropy, and the not-for-profit sectors.Management experts stress the importance of strategic thinking.Change agents are urged to act strategically. Strategic planninghas long been a mainstay of organizational development. Leaders inall sectors talk not about theories of change or logicmodels, but about being strategic: Strategic thinking. Strategicplanning. Strategic results. ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $2.54   
  • New (5) from $18.62   
  • Used (5) from $2.45   
Sending request ...

Overview

Strategy has emerged as a watchword of modern change efforts. Callsto be strategic are sounded in the private sector,government, philanthropy, and the not-for-profit sectors.Management experts stress the importance of strategic thinking.Change agents are urged to act strategically. Strategic planninghas long been a mainstay of organizational development. Leaders inall sectors talk not about theories of change or logicmodels, but about being strategic: Strategic thinking. Strategicplanning. Strategic results. Being strategic. Strategy execution.Effective strategies. Adapting strategically. And, now,evaluating strategy. But strategy is a new unit of analysisfor evaluation. Traditionally, evaluation has focused on projects,programs, products, policies, and personnel. What does it mean totreat strategy as the evaluation focus, as the thing evaluated'What is strategy? How does one evaluate strategy? What arethe implications of this new direction for evaluation theory,methods, practice, and, ultimately, use? This issue examines thesequestions and provides examples of strategy-focused evaluations.Evaluating strategy is not about evaluating strategic planning, oreven strategic plans. It's about evaluating strategy itself.Strategy is the evaluand. That poses new challenges and offers newopportunities to meet the information needs of evaluation users.For evaluation to be relevant to decision makers and leaders, thefocus of the evaluation must be on what they are concerned aboutand what they care about. Increasingly, they care about identifyingand implementing effective strategies. That's where evaluationenters the picture. Evaluating strategy has the purpose of makingstrategy more effective, differentiating effective from ineffectivestrategies, and contributing to the ongoing development andadaptation of strategy in response to changing conditions andreal-world complexities. Evaluating strategy is a new direction forevaluation, one that is likely to take on increasing importance—ifevaluators learn to do it well. This issue takes up that challenge.

This is the 128th volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly reportseries New Directions for Evaluation, an official publication ofthe American Evaluation Association.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

EDITORS’ NOTES (Patricia A. Patrizi, Michael QuinnPatton).

1. Strategy as the Focus for Evaluation (Michael QuinnPatton, Patricia A. Patrizi).
This chapter examines what it means to treat strategy as the unitof analysis and focus for evaluation.

2. Strategy Evaluation: Experience at the InternationalDevelopment Research Centre (Tricia Wind, FredCarden).
This chapter explains how IDRC uses strategic evaluations, andexplores potential implications for evaluation of HenryMintzberg’s ideas on tracking strategy.

3. Death Is Certain, Strategy Isn’t: Assessing the RobertWood. Johnson Foundation’s End-of-Life Grant Making(Patricia A. Patrizi).
This chapter discusses a retrospective evaluation of the RobertWood Johnson Foundation’s 20-year strategy to improve care atthe end of life.

4. The W. K. Kellogg Foundation’s Devolution Initiative:An Experiment in Evaluating Strategy (Kay E.Sherwood).
Informed by the perspective of evaluation as a strategicintervention, this chapter revisits evaluation of a major andcontroversial government reform, welfare devolution, and aphilanthropic foundation initiative that mobilized around thereform’s implications, including external evaluation of thatinitiative.

5. Strategy Evaluation: Emerging Processes and Methods(Patricia A. Patrizi).
This chapter distinguishes prospective and retrospectiveevaluations of strategy, and offers lessons on framing a strategyevaluation, determining strategy boundaries, and data collectionand analysis.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)