Eve

Eve

4.2 25
by Elissa Elliott
     
 

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BONUS: This edition contains an Eve discussion guide.

In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a powerful new twist on the story of creation’s first family. Here is Eve brought to life in a way religion and myth have never allowed–as a wife, a mother, and a woman. With…  See more details below

Overview

BONUS: This edition contains an Eve discussion guide.

In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a powerful new twist on the story of creation’s first family. Here is Eve brought to life in a way religion and myth have never allowed–as a wife, a mother, and a woman. With stunning intimacy, Elliott boldly reimagines Eve’s journey before and after the banishment from Eden, her complex marriage to Adam, her troubled relationship with her daughters, and the tragedy that would overcome her sons, Cain and Abel. From a woman’s first awakening to a mother’s innermost hopes and fears, from moments of exquisite tenderness to a climax of shocking violence, Eve explores the very essence of love, womanhood, faith, and humanity.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440338253
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/27/2009
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
74,283
File size:
3 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Elissa Elliott is a former high school teacher. She is a contributing writer to Books & Culture and has optioned her first screenplay. She and her husband, Daniel Elliott, live in Minnesota. This is her first novel.


From the Hardcover edition.

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Eve 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Imaginative and good, full of humanity
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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TOES-IN-SAND_LOVER More than 1 year ago
Not A huge fan of religious books, but this book outlines, with beautiful detail, the life and times of Adam and Eve and thier family as told by writer and her view of what it might have been like for them. I loved it and couldnt put it down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Robotica83 More than 1 year ago
A very original rendition of the Adam and Eve story. Covering everything from their time in the garden and their subsequent exile to Cain's murder of his brother Abel, this book was a delightful and creative way to reexperience familiar events in the bible from a personal perspective. It even interwove Eve's story with that of the Mesopotamians and Sumerians who arguably existed at the same time and close to the same place. Strongly recommended for everyone who's wondered what things were like from the ones who were actually there.
tejneckyc More than 1 year ago
A beautiful lyrical accounting of the first family of the Bible. The author deals with some difficult questions of spirituality and how to mesh the biblical tradition with historical facts. It comes across as pretty believable to those of us who are not professionals in the field of Mesopotamian cultures. The spiritual answers the author comes to are also very logical and insightful. Don't get stuck on the Lucifer bit or you'll end up missing a book with a lot of opportunity for enlightenment.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Rideshorses More than 1 year ago
I liked this book alot; interesting and insightful. It really fleshed out the characters; and presented the problems they must have faced. Good read.
JuliaandJames More than 1 year ago
A very sweet and poignant story about the "first" family, told in a way that is so very relatable. Our book club LOVED it, as it spurred much discussion, allowing us to question what we all once that was unquestionable. What a delight!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Trini More than 1 year ago
I bought this book after reading East Of Eden (by John Steinbeck)becuse I wanted to read about Abel and Cain.I found this fictional story of Adam, Eve and thier children amazing and mystifying. As a mother and wife I found that I could sympathized with all Eve's adventures and tragedies. I also now have a better understanting of the relationship between the well known brothers Abel and Cain. I truly enjoyed this novel and recommend it to open-minded and advernturous souls.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wonderful look at relationships and Eve's personal journey. Highly recommend
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Therianthrope_Foxe More than 1 year ago
Truly stunning. Anyone who loves historical drama or fiction should read this novel. It is original and full of life. Once you start reading it's hard to put it down. It is beautifully complex and full of robust drama and touching moments. A really great novel!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I appreciated the view of Eve and her daughters and related to many of the feelings represented in the story. Elliott tackles some pretty tough subject matter and will undoubtably offend some readers. I enjoyed the book and was happy to find some of her research shared in the afterward.
Dulcibelle More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the story here, but had a little trouble keeping track of who was speaking. The author tells her story thru Eve and Eve's three daughters. Eve's part of the story is told in the first person, as are the stories of two of the three daughters, Naava's story (the oldest daughter) is told in the third person. While I can see some of the reasoning for this - with Naava's story in the third person, you don't get quite as attached to her, it does make following the story line a little difficult. Early chapters were also a little difficult to read because Eve was so whiney. This however, changed as the book went along and Eve got older.

It was interesting to see the author's take on Adam and Eve, how they felt being cast out of the Garden, how other people came into their lives, what happened with Cain and Abel, and it was really interesting to read the Afterword which told where the author got her ideas. I'm glad this material was included as the Afterword, however, as it does contain some spoilers if you were to read it first.

Because this was Eve's story, Adam and the other males (Cain, Abel, and the other sons) in the story got a little bit left out. I would love to see a story written from their viewpoint. It would be interesting to compare the two.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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harstan More than 1 year ago
Eve and Adam love their life in the Garden of Eden. However, paradise is lost when Eve seduced by Lucifer as much as by her curiosity persuades Adam to take an apple bite from the Tree of Knowledge forbidden fruit. Saddened but a believer in the original tough love, Elohim kicks the pair from the Garden and into the harsh cruel world. ------------ Over the next few years, the previously pampered pair struggle, but finally turn it around as their home becomes a safe haven to raise kids and drink beer with figs and grapes. They have several children as Adam believes in barefoot and pregnant. Abel is a sheepherder; Cain becomes a farmer, Seth the favorite provides solace to his mom; Naava is a weaver; Dara is a potter; and Aya the healer remains invisible to her family. Cain turns away from Elohim to the Sumerian fertility goddess Inanna while his sister Naava seduces him into taking her to the nearby city. Naava is jealous that Dara works for the prince, so she marries the prince. Outraged by her betrayal Cain causes a riot that displaces the first family and soon commits fratricide.------------- This dysfunctional family drama makes for an enjoyable biblical biographical fiction in which they needed a shrink. The story line leaps around as perspective is rotated. Eve grows in her job as the first mom after being kicked to the curb by God due to the original sin. Her daughters even "invisible" Aya come across as fully developed in part because they tell the saga while the males are not fleshed out beyond their roles of supporting the women who dominate their lives. Although except for the setting, the First family feels like an American brood sent back to the first days, fans will enjoy the novelization of Eve and her clan.---------- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nursury