Even in the Quietest Moments...

( 2 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
The title of Even in the Quietest Moments... isn't much of an exaggeration -- this 1977 album finds Supertramp indulging in some of their quietest moments, spending almost the album in a subdued mood. Actually, the cover photo picture of a snow-covered piano sitting on a mountain gives a good indication of what the album sounds like: it's elegant yet mildly absurd, witty but kind of obscure. It also feels more pop than it actually is, despite the opening single, "Give a Little Bit," their poppiest song to date, as well as their biggest hit. If the rest of the album doesn't boast another song as tight or concise as this -- "Downstream" comes close but it doesn't ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
The title of Even in the Quietest Moments... isn't much of an exaggeration -- this 1977 album finds Supertramp indulging in some of their quietest moments, spending almost the album in a subdued mood. Actually, the cover photo picture of a snow-covered piano sitting on a mountain gives a good indication of what the album sounds like: it's elegant yet mildly absurd, witty but kind of obscure. It also feels more pop than it actually is, despite the opening single, "Give a Little Bit," their poppiest song to date, as well as their biggest hit. If the rest of the album doesn't boast another song as tight or concise as this -- "Downstream" comes close but it doesn't have the same hook, while "Babaji," a pseudo-spiritual moment that falls from the pop mark; the other four tracks clock in well over six minutes, with the closer, "Fool's Overture," reaching nearly 11 minutes -- it nevertheless places a greater emphasis on melody and gentle textures than any previous Supertramp release. So, it's a transitional album, bridging the gap between Crime of the Century and the forthcoming Breakfast in America, and even if it's not as full formed as either, it nevertheless has plenty of fine moments aside from "Give a Little Bit," including the music hall shuffle of "Loverboy," the Euro-artiness of "From Now On," and the "Fool on a Hill" allusions on "Fool's Overture."
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/11/2002
  • Label: A&M
  • UPC: 606949334826
  • Catalog Number: 493348
  • Sales rank: 4,335

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Give a Little Bit (4:08)
  2. 2 Lover Boy (6:49)
  3. 3 Even in the Quietest Moments (6:28)
  4. 4 Downstream (4:01)
  5. 5 Babaji (4:51)
  6. 6 From Now On (6:21)
  7. 7 Fool's Overture (10:52)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Supertramp Primary Artist, Primary Artist
Roger Hodgson Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
Rick Davies Keyboards, Vocals
John Helliwell Saxophone, Vocals, Woodwind, Wind Instruments
Gary Mielke oberheim
Bob C. Benberg Drums, Percussion, Drums
Dougie Thompson Bass
Dougie Thomson Bass
Technical Credits
Roger Hodgson Composer
Supertramp Producer, Orchestral Arrangements
Tom Anderson Remixing
Greg Calbi Mastering
Michel Colombier Orchestral Arrangements
Rick Davies Composer
Jay Messina Mastering
Gary Mielke Programming
Russel Pope Engineer
Michael Diehl Reissue Design
Mike Doud Art Direction
Frank DeLuna Mastering
Beth Stempel Reissue Production Coordination
Pete Henderson Engineer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Supertramp Shows Some Uniqueness

    "Even in the Quietest Moments" is very unique compared to most albums in Supertramp's catalog. This is mainly because the electronic keyboard was rarely used for this album. Another thing that makes this album unique, is the fact that an FM radio hit ("Give a Little Bit") happens to be the album's opening track. The rest of the songs on the album can be appealing to all Supertramp fans. The progressive title track is quiet at first but catchy later on. "From Now On" is also a pretty good song. I also highly reccomend listening to "Babaji", which sounds very similar to "Logical Song" from "Breakfast in America". "Downstream" is a relaxing song, plus it goes very well with the album cover. The 10-minute "Fool's Overture" is a very unusual finale, and it's probably the closest thing you'll ever get to progressive rock on this album. "Lover Boy" is not much of a song to listen to, but I still highly reccomend the album.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Linking Supertramp's Pop and Classical Prowess

    Recorded in the thin-air mountains of Colorado (the band had to keep oxygen bottles with them), "Even in the Quietest Moments" is the album that best demonstrates the ties that bind Supertramp's elegant prog-rock/classical music influences and FM radio pop intentions. This is the second of two albums (the other being "Crisis? What Crisis?") the English quintet recorded between their breakthrough "Crime of the Century" and their smash mega-hit "Breakfast in America." The two lost classics are often looked upon as being "lesser" works due to being unpredictable in content, but each has an important role in Supertramp's musical tapestry. The first song, the radio hit 'Give A Little Bit' preludes the textbook-perfect pop that the band would soon be identified with, featuring some of the glossiest acoustic guitar ever recorded, but it's the more progressive rock-flavored songs that define the album. The gorgeous title track embodies Roger Hodgson's delicate vocals, which take on an idea of youthful unrest and wandering, its interesting arrangement always building up to something climactic, but never does. Even the simple FM radio subject matter of 'Lover Boy' is placed into an extravagant arrangement as Rick Davies sings his heart out, warning girls about a prototypical Supertramp character, while the struggling musician's anthem 'From Now On' is just as grandiose. The vocalist does well in more subdued places as well; 'Downstream' consists only of Davies' wonderfully odd voice and a piano (and maybe an overdubbed second piano here and there). 'Babaji' is another forefront to "Breakfast In America," but with a twist; while the song is so infectious it could make you dance, it's a complicated form of spiritual faith that Supertramp is expressing, not some teenage love. The album's closing ten-minute epic 'Fool's Overture' is the definitive song, a social statement featuring classic prog-rock elements like sound effects (a recording of a speech by Winston Churchill), and a dramatic, winding classical movement that goes from frenetic synthesizer hooks to simple, pleading piano-and-vocals by Hodgson. Supertramp would later use this blueprint for later epics like 'Brother Where You Bound?' in 1985 (with Ronald Reagan and other 80s Cold War figures replacing Churchill). Aside from being an intriguing, often exciting, look at the connections between prog, classical, and pop tastes, "Even in the Quietest Moments" also set an ethic that Supertramp would always follow; despite the ultra-sleek, ultra-polished production, the emotive side still glimmers like the Caribou, Colorado snow in the sun.

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