Every Kid Needs Things That Fly

Overview

The sky is no longer the limit! Parents and kids can make flying projects such as:

" A craft stick air force-from WWII bombers to military transport helicopters.

" Masking tape airports complete with runways

" Blinking UFOs that hover and land

" Parachutes for action figures, with launch platform

" Hot air balloons that use appliances around the house

" Realistic jetpacks with real moving parts

" Water bottle rockets that shoot more than 150 feet in the air

...
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Overview

The sky is no longer the limit! Parents and kids can make flying projects such as:

" A craft stick air force-from WWII bombers to military transport helicopters.

" Masking tape airports complete with runways

" Blinking UFOs that hover and land

" Parachutes for action figures, with launch platform

" Hot air balloons that use appliances around the house

" Realistic jetpacks with real moving parts

" Water bottle rockets that shoot more than 150 feet in the air

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
What do PVC pipe, pegboard, popsicle sticks, fishing bobbers, empty soda bottles, valve stems from inner bicycle tubes, primer, bamboo skewers, electrical tape nylon webbing, balloons, and craft foam all have in common? Each is a material used in one of the twenty building projects in this exceptional book about things that fly. The first chapter tells how to build a workbench, and the following six chapters delve into projects related to hot-air balloons, parachutes, airplanes, UFOs, water rockets, and jet packs. Each one contains shopping lists and supply lists (as not all households are on equal footing in the handyman area) and plentiful photographs, diagrams, and drawings of the projects in various stages of assembly. An excellent hands-on book for kids who want to build things. Parental involvement is often advisable (and fun) but older kids will be able to do much of it independently. The introduction of the book highlights the author's passion for flight, building, and learning together. His anecdotal reminiscences at the start of each chapter are not only interesting but also educational. Highly recommended, especially for those who have difficulty coming up with a cool project from scratch. 2005, Gibbs Smith Publisher, Ages 9 to 12.
—Cindy L. Carolan
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781586855093
  • Publisher: Smith, Gibbs Publisher
  • Publication date: 6/29/2005
  • Pages: 136
  • Age range: 6 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Meet the Author

Ritchie Kinmont is a designer of industrial assembly machinery for an automotive company. His lifelong passion is tinkering in his workshop where his favorite projects are those he can do with his three young sons. Some of his inventions have been marketed through a major toy company. Ritchie earned his pilot's license while still a teenager and now shares his love of aviation and inventing with his sons. He lives in Utah.
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Read an Excerpt

When I was a little boy, my heroes were Wilbur and Orville Wright. They lived over a hundred years ago, before there were any airplanes. As boys, they liked to tinker around in their workshop, and I loved to tinker at my workbench. They were bicycle mechanics, and I loved mechanical things. They built and flew airplanes before anybody else knew how, and I loved things that fly.

I've studied the Wright brothers and I've learned some interesting things about them. They were very curious and always wanted to know how things worked. They had powerful imaginations and could see things in their minds that didn't exist yet. The Wright brothers were also very creative and they could make amazing things out of ordinary things.

Orville and Wilbur's parents liked it when their children made things, and they were always helping them find answers to their questions. Their mother knew how to use tools because her father was a carriage-maker. She made toys for the boys and taught them to use tools. One day, Mr. Wright brought home a toy for them to play with. It was a stick with a propeller on it, wound up with a rubber band. It flew like a helicopter, except there were no helicopters then. Orville and Wilbur played with the flying toy until it wore out. Then they figured out how to make flying toys of their own.

When the Wright brothers were older, they had a bicycle shop. They designed a better bicycle than anyone had thought of. Lots of people bought their bicycles. When they were grown men, they wanted to learn how to make real flying machines. No one had been able to make a good one yet-one that could be controlled so the pilot could steer it. No one had figured out how to make a flying machine stay in the air for more than a few seconds. But Orville and Wilbur wanted to make one with an engine on it. So they got to work building engines and flying machine parts.

On a winter day in North Carolina, more than a hundred years ago, the Wright brothers were successful-they made a flying machine that actually flew! Imagination and hard work make their dream come true.

The next time you see an airplane in the sky, think about two curious boys who kept asking questions, kept learning all they could, and kept trying again and again until they figured out how to make great things that fly.

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Table of Contents

Introduction

1 Every Kid Needs A Workbench

Workbench and Stool/Skill Level 2

2 Hot Air Balloon Projects

The 16-Inch Hot-Air Balloon/Skill Level 1

The 36-Inch Helium Balloon/Skill Level 2

The 5-Foot Hot-Air Balloon/Skill Level 2

3 Parachute Projects

Small Paratrooper/Skill Level 1

Large Paratrooper/Skill Level 1

Paratrooper Drop Platform/Skill Level 1

4 Airplane Projects

Masking Tape Airport/Skill Level 1

Popsicle Stick Aircraft/Skill Level 1

Car Seat Aircraft Control Stick/Skill Level 1

Car Seat Aircraft Control Yoke/Skill Level 1

5 UFO Projects

Blinking UFO/Skill Level 1

The 18-Inch UFO Lander/Skill Level 1

The 32-Inch UFO Lander/Skill Level 1

6 Water Bottle Rocket Projects

Comet III Water Rocket/Skill Level 2

Comet III Launch System/Skill Level 2

Interceptor Water Rocket/Skill Level 3

Interceptor Launch System/Skill Level 3

7 Jetpack Projects

The J3 Stinger Jetpack/Skill Level 3

The Pegasus X-35/Skill Level 3

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