Every Man for Himself

Every Man for Himself

2.5 2
by Orland Outland
     
 

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A Happy Hubby?
Hardly! How could John Eames have thought he could spend the rest of his life with a man whose idea of fun is a mid-sumer tour of Civil War battlefields? It isn't that John doesn't love dependable, intellectual Harrison. But there are definitely other fish in the sea, and lately, they seem to be swarming around John!

A Hot New

Overview

A Happy Hubby?
Hardly! How could John Eames have thought he could spend the rest of his life with a man whose idea of fun is a mid-sumer tour of Civil War battlefields? It isn't that John doesn't love dependable, intellectual Harrison. But there are definitely other fish in the sea, and lately, they seem to be swarming around John!

A Hot New Hubby?
Thanks to a trial separation, John is free at last to embrace his inner Boy Toy. From his San Francisco gym to the beaches of an all-male resort suitably called Babylon, he explores the dizzying array of options available to one who possesses perfect pecs and great hair. There's only one rule in this brash new world where anything goes: every man for himself.

Editorial Reviews

Bay Windows
By touching upon topical issues with deft humor and compassion for human failings and frailties, Orland Outland has created a surprisingly winning novel.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The efficacy of new treatments for AIDS also signals a milestone in the sorts of stories that can be written about gay men, much as John Rechy's, Patricia Nell Warren's and Andrew Holleran's work reflected the situation in the '70s and Paul Monette and the Dead Generation ferried us past in the '80s and '90s. But Outland does not explore the new environment in this novel, which instead adheres to the flourishing genre of gay pulp fiction, simple stories churned out to affirm gay souls and pass the time on beaches and couches. The narrative is entertaining in parts, but wafer thin. It centers on 33-year-old John Eames and his new beautiful body. Johnnie was always a bit of a schlub, but a post-diagnosis cocktail and steroids prescription turns his life around, affording him the reckless sex-and-drugs-soaked bacchanalia he'd never had. This new hedonism leads to problems with his boyfriend and his old circle of friends, whom he trades in for a younger, prettier set who spend their time at resorts with names like Babylon and clubs with names like Universe. Of the many possible resolutions to this promising scenario, Outland has chosen the least satisfying, leaving most of the issues--narrative and sociocultural--unresolved. The characters are wanly drawn, and the plot not sufficiently dramatic for this approach to satisfy, even as pulp fiction. Yet it is of modest interest for its introduction of the new set of post-AIDS-crisis dynamics that will no doubt fuel much of the gay literature we will see over the next few years. (June) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781575665535
Publisher:
Kensington
Publication date:
05/28/2000
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 8.96(h) x 0.86(d)

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Every Man for Himself 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book, while not literary genius, is an interesting read. It's a good pulp book to pick up and spend an evening with. Don't look to it for any profound meaning or to change your life. Accept, and enjoy, it for what it is - a fun gay novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One doesn't quite know for sure what Outland's purpose is in writing this novel. While he starts with a good premise (the quintissential satire of a beauty-obsessed culture), he veers off and drags the reader through pharmaceutical facts that, while enlightening, don't really help much with the plot. Then he turns around and sabotages his own criticism of society at the conclusion. There are a few good moments, but they're also undermined by dialogue that too often borders on cuteness.