Every Woman for Herself

Every Woman for Herself

4.6 3
by Trisha Ashley
     
 

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Charlotte—Charlie—Rhymer's husband wants a divorce. Charlie isn't sure what she wants, but after the incident with the frying pan, even she has to concede that their differences may be irreconcilable after all. Returning home to her native Yorkshire and the bosom of her family seemed like a good idea at the time. Even if Charlie's father has never

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Overview

Charlotte—Charlie—Rhymer's husband wants a divorce. Charlie isn't sure what she wants, but after the incident with the frying pan, even she has to concede that their differences may be irreconcilable after all. Returning home to her native Yorkshire and the bosom of her family seemed like a good idea at the time. Even if Charlie's father has never quite forgiven Charlie or her siblings (Anne, Emily and Branwell) for failing to live up to their more literary (as in Bronte) namesakes.

Upvale Parsonage, the family home to which Charlie has retreated, is presided over by her sister Em. Em's hobbies are composing inspirational verses, dabbling in the Ancient Black Arts, and fighting off the incursions of Father's latest mistress. When the current mistress actually moves in, family loyalties are sorely tried. Still, Charlie is determined to bounce back from disaster and strike a blow for deserted older wives everywhere. But when she meets brooding actor Mace North, she realizes that when it comes to dating for the over-forty crowd, female solidarity be damned—it's every woman for herself!

Sure to delight both Bronte fans and readers who like a good laugh with their romance, Trisha Ashley's first book to be published in the United States is a welcome treat.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
In her American debut, Briton Ashley gives us the tired tale of a middle-aged woman being dumped by her husband and left to face the usual assortment of post-divorce difficulties. Dim job prospects and losing her home force Charlotte Rhymer to take up temporary residence in her father's guest cottage. It doesn't take too many pages before various siblings and her father's latest lady friend all manage to contribute to Charlotte's angst and misery. Eventually, Charlotte lands a part-time job at a local day-care nursery. We aren't one bit surprised to find that the handsome playwright who comes to pick up his small daughter after school will soon be taking Charlotte home as well. Although there is occasionally a funny line, the humor is for the most part forced and overshadows the worn story. With romance writers like Jennifer Crusie and Jayne Ann Krentz doing the witty and wacky romantic genre so much better, it will take a bit more effort from Ashley before American readers embrace her. A marginal purchase for most public libraries.-Margaret Hanes, Sterling Heights P.L., MI Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
An eccentric English clan, in and out of love--in a first from Britisher Ashley. Charlotte ("Charlie") Rhymer may be too old for the droopy gothic get-ups her stodgy husband Matt thinks make her look young--but she doesn’t give a damn what she wears anymore. She’s absorbed in her painting, and in her sorrows after many miscarriages. She didn’t even notice when Matt cleared out most of his things before announcing that he wanted a divorce. He’s off to Saudi Arabia in a jiffy, but not before absent-minded Charlie accidentally cracks the skull of his lecherous best friend with a frying pan. Cleared of murder charges, back she goes to her family in a rambling old parsonage on the windswept moors. Nearby, a stone cottage houses her dear old dad, Ranulf Rhymer, a distinguished literary biographer who named his brood after the Brontës. He wants to move his idiot mistress-of-the-month, skinny Jessie, and her giggling twin girls up to the main house, but Em, Charlie’s virgin sister, a devotee of white magic, won’t have it. Branwell, their genius brother, can’t be bothered for his opinion, not that anyone would understand it. He mutters to himself in Amharic as he pens his latest indecipherable tome. Then there’s tough-talking foreign correspondent Anne, who comes home after breast-cancer surgery swearing like a pirate’s parrot. Charlie takes on the thankless task of babysitting an assortment of brats at a New Age nursery and meets Mace North, a handsome actor/playwright and the conveniently single father of the only child she likes: precocious Caitlin. Soon Em and the Yorkshire-bred housekeeper are brewing spells and reading tealeaves, conjuring up true love for those who deserve it andtummy-aches for those who don’t. They succeed beyond their wildest dreams when the local vicar goes Wicca and falls for Em, and Mace North waylays Charlie in the hedgerows for the erotic romp of a lifetime. Shrewd but gentle satire of various contemporary British types that never misses a beat. And it’s wonderfully funny to boot.
From the Publisher
"Shrewd but gentle satire of various contemporary British types that never misses a beat. And it's wonderfully funny to boot." —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"Giggles, guffaws, chortles, and chuckles abound in Ashley's cleverly satirical send-up of upper-class British snobbery and soap-opear stardom that is truly laught-out-loud funny." —Booklist

"Trisha Ashley writes with remarkable wit and originality and has created a deliciously acerbic heroine... One of the best writers around!" —Katie Fforde, author of Highland Fling

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781466838864
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
06/15/2003
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
477,388
File size:
337 KB

Meet the Author

Trisha Ashley is now a full-time novelist, but she has been known to work for stained glass makers and/or plumbers. She likes to paint, eat, drink, and read literary biographies. Her previous hobbies included getting divorced and packing to move. She claims to have once actually eaten Bronte burgers at the Branwell café, but her publisher declines to verify this. She lives in North Wales.
Trisha Ashley is now a full-time novelist, but she has been known to work for stained glass makers and/or plumbers. She likes to paint, eat, drink, and read literary biographies. Her previous hobbies included getting divorced and packing to move. She claims to have once actually eaten Bronte burgers at the Branwell café, but her publisher declines to verify this. Her books include Every Woman for Herself and Singled Out. She lives in North Wales.

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