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Everybody Makes Mistakes
     

Everybody Makes Mistakes

by Christine Kole MacLean, Cynthia Decker (Illustrator)
 
As he sits in time-out in his room, Jack compares his little mistake to thebigger ones other people have made, like the time Mom made him wear his sister's bunny mittens to school, or when the waitress mistook Jack for a girl, or when the teacher accidentally sat on Jack's snack. Kids will chuckle over all of these adult mistakes and the way they build up to the one

Overview

As he sits in time-out in his room, Jack compares his little mistake to thebigger ones other people have made, like the time Mom made him wear his sister's bunny mittens to school, or when the waitress mistook Jack for a girl, or when the teacher accidentally sat on Jack's snack. Kids will chuckle over all of these adult mistakes and the way they build up to the one that got Jack in trouble. Everything turns out okay in the end, because nobody's perfect and that makes life entertaining—just like this book!

Author Bio: Christine Kole MacLean is the author of Mary Margaret and the Perfect Pet Plan and Even Firefighters Hug Their Moms. She lives in Michigan.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Jackson is in trouble. Sitting in his room having a time out, he thinks about all the times other people have made mistakes: his mother once made him wear his sister's fluffy bunny hat to school; his father broke the "Monster-Be-Gone Mist" sprayer before he had a chance to secure Jackson's room; a waitress once called Jackson "young lady." What was Jackson's mistake? Near the end of the book we learn that today—the day that Uncle Kevin is marrying Aunt Lola—Jackson drew all over his little sister's face with markers. (His sister loves her new look, by the way.) "Everyone makes mistakes," we are told. The bride and groom are perfectly happy with the way Cammy looks, and the bride has a few tattoos of her own, anyway. The story is told in flashbacks, which may be confusing for younger readers. It is good to see a book with a lesson ("everybody makes mistakes," of course) that does not preach, but could easily lead to a discussion about making good decisions and admitting when you have done something wrong. The lively and amusing illustrations work well with the text. 2005, Dutton Children's Books/Penguin, Ages 3 to 7.
—Sara Lorimer
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Jack is in really big trouble with his mom-he's in a time-out and she's using his full name, Jackson-for making "one little mistake." What's the big deal? he thinks. "Everybody makes mistakes." There was the time he lost his mittens and hat and Mom told him to wear his sister's to school. "No one will notice," she said. Big mistake. There was the waitress who thought he was a girl. And there was the time at school that he carefully set his snack down next to him, only to have his teacher sit on it. But today, before getting ready for his uncle's wedding, he actually made three mistakes. Playing beauty shop with his sister, he used gum to hold her new coiffure in place, did her nails up to her knuckles, and made up her face with blue and red permanent markers. At the party, the happy couple finds the whole thing amusing. Then, dancing away, the bride bumps into Mom, spilling punch on her. The premise of this story is promising, but it fails to capture the imagination completely. The examples of others' mistakes border on slapstick at times, and the humor seems forced. Decker's watercolor-and-ink illustrations are pleasant but don't totally carry a weak plot. Bernard Waber's Nobody Is Perfick (Houghton, 1991) and Janet Morgan Stoeke's "Minerva Louise" series (Dutton) remain better choices.-Roxanne Burg, Orange County Public Library, CA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
An innocent mistake (or three) is ill timed, as one family must be on their best behavior for a relative's wedding. Recounting other mistakes that he has observed as his defense, Jackson tries to convince his mother that perhaps she's looking at things the wrong way. He tries to explain that the makeover he gave his sister, Cammy, using permanent markers and gum, was not only an innocent mistake, but might actually be a good thing. Hidden from view until the end of the story, Cammy seems unfazed by the conversation, insisting that she looks beautiful as she beams at her brother. A tattooed bride takes it all in stride as she examines the children before managing to bump into the mother, causing her to spill her punch. Realistic illustrations will make children laugh as they learn that anyone really can make a mistake. Entertaining and clever. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525472254
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
06/28/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.86(w) x 10.36(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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