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Everybody's Rockin'
     

Everybody's Rockin'

by Neil Young & the Shocking Pinks
 

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Everybody's Rockin', credited to "Neil and the Shocking Pinks," was largely dismissed as a perverse novelty/hoax when it was originally released in 1983. That reaction wasn't surprising, since this brief collection of stripped-down, swinging rockabilly tunes incongruously followed the futurist-electropunk Trans, which had already served to thoroughly

Overview

Everybody's Rockin', credited to "Neil and the Shocking Pinks," was largely dismissed as a perverse novelty/hoax when it was originally released in 1983. That reaction wasn't surprising, since this brief collection of stripped-down, swinging rockabilly tunes incongruously followed the futurist-electropunk Trans, which had already served to thoroughly perplex a sizable chunk of the artist's audience. That's a shame, since this unlikely winner -- not exactly essential Young, but a swell listen nonetheless -- has a good deal more to recommend it than its critics are willing to concede. Not surprisingly, Young's take on rockabilly isn't a matter of retro purism. Instead, tunes like "Wonderin'" and "Cry, Cry, Cry" have a bemused, slightly unhinged quality that's unmistakably, eccentrically personal. The tongue-in-cheek "Payola Blues" carries the bitter sting of autobiographical experience, and covers of the early rock/blues standards "Mystery Train" and "Bright Lights, Big City" carry an emotional gravity that belies the project's surface lightheartedness.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - William Ruhlmann
By following the hi-tech Trans after only seven months with a rockabilly album, Neil Young baffled his audience. Just as he had followed the sales peak of Harvest in 1972 with a series of challenging, uncommercial albums, Young had now dissipated the commercial and critical acceptance he had enjoyed with 1979's Rust Never Sleeps with a series of mediocre albums and inexplicable genre exercises. Everybody's Rockin', credited to "Neil & the Shocking Pinks," represented the nadir of this attempted career suicide. Running less than 25 minutes, it found Young covering early rock evergreens like "Betty Lou's Got a New Pair of Shoes" and writing a few songs in the same vein ("Kinda Fonda Wanda"). If he had presented this as a mini-album at a discount price, it would have been easier to enjoy the joke Young seemed to intend. As it was, fans who already had their doubts about Young dropped off the radar screen; Everybody's Rockin' was his lowest-charting album since his 1969 solo debut, and he didn't release another album for two years (his longest break ever between records).

Product Details

Release Date:
08/01/2000
Label:
Universal Mod Afw
UPC:
0606949070625
catalogNumber:
490706
Rank:
5543

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