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Everyday Apocalypse: The Sacred Revealed in Radiohead, The Simpsons, and Other Pop Culture Icons

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Overview

The term "apocalypse" usually evokes images of mass destruction-burning buildings and nuclear fallout, or even rapture and tribulation. Often, our attempts to interpret the imagery of the book of Revelation seem to carry us far away from our day-to-day existence.

David Dark challenges this narrow understanding in Everyday Apocalypse, calling his readers back to the root of the word, which is "revelation." Through readings of Flannery O'Connor stories and savvy discussion of The ...

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Everyday Apocalypse: The Sacred Revealed in Radiohead, The Simpsons, and Other Pop Culture Icons

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Overview

The term "apocalypse" usually evokes images of mass destruction-burning buildings and nuclear fallout, or even rapture and tribulation. Often, our attempts to interpret the imagery of the book of Revelation seem to carry us far away from our day-to-day existence.

David Dark challenges this narrow understanding in Everyday Apocalypse, calling his readers back to the root of the word, which is "revelation." Through readings of Flannery O'Connor stories and savvy discussion of The Matrix themes, Dark calls us to imagine the apocalypse as a more watchful way of being in the world. He draws on the sometimes unlikely wisdom of popular culture-including The Simpsons and films like The Truman Show-to highlight how the imagination can expose our moral condition. Ultimately, Dark presents apocalypse as honest self-assessment and other-centeredness in the here and now.

This engaging book holds enormous appeal for readers interested in the pursuit of everyday spirituality. It will delight lovers of literature, popular music, and movies, as well as anyone concerned with a Christian response to popular culture.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781587430558
  • Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/1/2002
  • Pages: 160
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.35 (d)

Meet the Author

David Dark has published articles and reviews in Prism magazine and Books & Culture. He teaches English at Christ Presbyterian Academy in Nashville.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2003

    joe and cohen,s review

    David Darks Everyday Apocalypse deals with the misrepresentation of the word ¿apocalypse¿; and shows us how the correct representation is something that is occurring in everyday life. To start a level of equal comprehension, Dark explains that apocalypse is not a Biblical term that should be used only to relate to the end of days or the days of judgment. Dark explains that through out the Bible, the term is use to explain how the future is approaching the present, therefore influencing modern times. The influence is so potent, so effective that it is revealed in everyday pop culture. Movies, music, television, novels, ect. These tools of communication are speaking out to us, revealing what this world of ours ultimately could turn out to be. Through the puns of The Simpsons, or through the gloomy, technology-age resentment in Radiohead¿s music and lyrics, we are being informed, maybe warned of what could come. The reason we give this book a 3-star rating is because of how it reads. There seems to be too many tangents through the chapters. They are all supposed to relate but they end up boring you somewhat because you lose focus on the main connection. Even though this happens, it is still entertaining and interesting. Check it out if you have the time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

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