Everyday Sacred Journal

Overview

"When I started this journey I was hoping to find a miracle, one that might dramatically change my life. What I found was far more important: the extreme importance of small things."

Like the vibrant yet simple quilts that spoke to her heart and led her to live with the Amish and to write the New York Times bestselling Plain and Simple, the empty begging bowl is the powerful — though sometimes elusive — symbol in Sue Bender's Everyday Sacred.

Returning home from the Amish, ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $99.99   
  • Used (13) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$99.99
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(70)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New,clean,crisp and tight copy. We offer quick shipping, careful packaging, full money-back guarantee and a personally selected range of books on self-help, health, healing, ... homeopathy, relationships, metaphysics, art, Buddhism and Eastern wisdom traditions at most reasonable prices. Please browse our wonderful selection. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Sacramento, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$125.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(177)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

"When I started this journey I was hoping to find a miracle, one that might dramatically change my life. What I found was far more important: the extreme importance of small things."

Like the vibrant yet simple quilts that spoke to her heart and led her to live with the Amish and to write the New York Times bestselling Plain and Simple, the empty begging bowl is the powerful — though sometimes elusive — symbol in Sue Bender's Everyday Sacred.

Returning home from the Amish, Bender struggled to apply the peaceful wisdom and simplicity she learned from them to her hectic life. Then one day she heard the story of the begging bowl and instinctively knew it had much to teach her: each day a Zen monk goes with an empty bowl in his hands; whatever is placed in the bowl will be his nourishment for the day. So, too, Bender discovered, if we approached each day afresh, with our bowls waiting to be filled, we will find at the end of the day that extraordinary things — some so small we may be tempted to overlook them — have come our way.

Everyday Sacred is filled with the stories, the people, and the experiences that filled Bender's bowl — a "connect-the-dots record of my search for the sacred in everyday life." From the simple act of clearing off her desk to enjoying a perfectly prepared cappuccino to realizing she can only do three of the thirteen things on her to-do list, Bender finds that each step along one's journey is a place to learn.

In the end, Bender discovers for herself — and shows us in the process — that "small miracles are there for us, all around. We can find them everywhere — in our homes, in our daily activities, and, hardest to see, in ourselves."

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062515438
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 12/17/1997
  • Pages: 144
  • Product dimensions: 7.37 (w) x 7.37 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

How It Began

"I'll never write another word," I thought with relief when Plain and Simple was published. I felt complete — exhausted and satisfied.

I had survived an obsessive love affair that had taken over my life for seven years. Cross out person and put in project: the feeling was the same. I'd felt the excitement of going overboard — a fierce single-minded intention, none of it making sense — and I believed I had no other choice.

Now I had a choice.

I would come home and calm down. I would do one thing at a time. I would work in my studio with clay, something I loved doing. I wouldn't rush. I would live the simple life I had learned about among the Amish — calm and purposeful.

"Art is order, made out of the chaos of life," Saul Bellow once wrote. I scribbled the words in pencil on a scrap of torn paper, placed it on the white Formica table next to my bed, and held it down with a large pewter heart.

I expected my life to be transformed.

I expected a miracle.

At first my days were unhurried. I enjoyed whatever I wasdoing. The spirit of the Amish was all around. On those days Ifelt grateful.

Then, hardly noticing it, I started getting busy, saying "yes" to the many things that were offered. Suddenly I had too much on my plate. I had slipped back into an old groove, frantically scurrying to get everything done, crossing things off a never-ending list, and feeling the constant weight of all that was left undone.

Iwas back in the world of "never enough."

I still felt a hunger inside that I didn't understand and couldn't satisfy.

"You should have called your book Hectic and Chaotic!" my son David observed.

I had learned a lot, but not enough.

The day I heard that Plain and Simple had made the New York Times best-seller list I happened to meet a good friend at the vegetable store. Glowing, I told her the remarkable news. It seemed like a miracle.

"What number are you?" she asked, her voice showing neither delight nor wonder.

For a moment, I didn't even know what she was asking.

Then I realized she wanted to know what position I had on the list. That was one of those moments when everything stops and a space opens up. In that instant I could see that in this world nothing I did would ever be enough.

I was still anxious. I was fifty-eight years old and did not want to spend my remaining years feeling this way. Something was still missing, something more that I should be doing so I could feel good about myself and the life I was leading. Even this achievement, far beyond anything I had ever expected or dreamed possible, could not silence that critical voice.

Everyday Sacred



EVERYDAY SACRED appeared one day in my mind's eye, in sure, bold letters, like one of those blinking restaurant signs. I didn't even know what everyday sacred meant, but I knew it would be the title of my next book.

Two years went by and I didn't write a word.

Then on a day when I was feeling particularly discouraged, another clear image appeared:

A BEGGING BOWL.

Actually, it reappeared.

I had read M.C. Richards's Centering years before. It was a book about clay and art and life. In it, Richards described Jean Genet, the French playwright, who had said he wanted to roam the countryside like a monk, holding a begging bowl, having filled it with what he needed for the nourishment in his life.

EVERYDAY SACRED and now the BEGGING BOWL.

It was obvious to all who knew me that I wasn't a monk, and the very idea of begging would make most of us uncomfortable. In spite of that, the image of a begging bowl reached out and grabbed my heart.

The image of the bowl became the image of the book.

All I knew about a begging bowl was that each day a monk goes out with his empty bowl in his hands. Whatever is placed in the bowl will be his nourishment for the day.

I didn't know whether I was the monk or the bowl or the things that would fill the bowl, or all three, but I trusted the words and the image completely.

At that moment I felt most like the empty bowl, waiting to be filled.

I turned on the computer, hoping to write, but no words came. With the computer still humming, I walked, practically galloped downstairs to the studio and opened a twenty-five-pound bag of clay, ready to make my first begging bowl. The moment my hands touched the clay, I remembered a wise and wonderful statement that M.C. Richards had made many years ago:

"It's not pots we are forming, it's ourselves."

Like the monk going out with his empty bowl, I set out to see what each day offered.

I began noticing, the way an observer might, what I was doing — all my thoughts, feelings, and experiences that might be connected to everyday sacred.

Somehow, in some way not yet shown to me, I felt there was a connection between EVERYDAY SACRED and the BEGGING BOWL.

I looked up sacred in the dictionary and found: "entitled to reverence." Close by was sacrament: "a practice that is considered especially sacred as a sign or symbol of a deeper reality.

Are ordinary, familiar things "entitled to reverence"?

I wanted to see with fresh eyes.

What might have been there all along that I had not been able to see? What had I taken for granted?

When I began looking, I found teachers everywhere. Some were officially designated "wise people." Others were not, but were equally wise. Memories from the past reappeared, fresh. Objects reached out with lessons to teach.

I learned from everything and everybody.

What follows are the stories, the people, and the experiences that filled my bowl — a connect-the-dots record of my search for the sacred in everyday life.

Everyday Sacred copyright © by Sue Bender. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All Rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)