Everyone Dies (Kevin Kerney Series #8)

( 9 )

Overview

With "a cunning mind for crime fiction" (New York Times Book Review), Anthony Award-nominated Michael McGarrity ratchets up the stakes in his novel of a vengeful killer with an unspeakable agenda: offing people with ties to the criminal justice system. Next on the list: Santa Fe Police Chief Kevin Kerney, his wife, Lieutenant Colonel Sara Brannon, and their unborn son.

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Overview

With "a cunning mind for crime fiction" (New York Times Book Review), Anthony Award-nominated Michael McGarrity ratchets up the stakes in his novel of a vengeful killer with an unspeakable agenda: offing people with ties to the criminal justice system. Next on the list: Santa Fe Police Chief Kevin Kerney, his wife, Lieutenant Colonel Sara Brannon, and their unborn son.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Michael McGarrity, a former deputy sheriff, brings an insider's perspective to this dynamic, character-driven story, a hard-hitting blend of police procedural and edge-of-your seat thriller. Santa Fe police chief Kevin Kerney has big plans for his vacation, but everything goes on hold when his friend, a prominent gay attorney, is murdered. The shocking crime is just the beginning, though. Next, the horse Kerney trained and cared for is viciously slaughtered, a former colleague is found murdered, and someone delivers poisoned rats to Kerney's home along with a horrifying note explaining that the killer's real target is Kerney himself. But, the note says, the chief must suffer before Everyone Dies….
The New York Times
Michael McGarrity is one of those low-key pros who keep the genre honest with realistic crime stories and plain-talking cops who know the procedures. The virtues of this down-to-earth style are on view in Everyone Dies, No. 8 in a solid series set in New Mexico and braced by Kevin Kerney as the chief of the Santa Fe Police Department. — Marilyn Stasio
Publishers Weekly
The questions and concerns of relationships, both everyday and extraordinary, personal and professional, lie at the heart of McGarrity's ninth entry in his Kevin Kerney series of police procedurals (The Big Gamble; Tularosa; The Judas Judge). Kerney, chief of the Santa Fe police force, and his wife, Sara Brannon, pregnant and due to give birth at any moment, have just begun a much needed vacation. Sara is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Military Police and will be assigned to the Pentagon just six weeks after the baby is born-a career move that Kerney opposes. A vicious killer slashes his way into the midst of this family crisis, beginning by shooting a Santa Fe lawyer, and in quick succession murdering Kerney's beloved horse, a forensic psychologist and a probation officer. It doesn't take long for Kerney to realize that his entire family has been targeted, especially after the killer begins leaving messages that say, "Everyone Dies." Area law enforcement personnel rally around the chief and begin a massive investigation. The large and varied supporting cast is sometimes difficult to keep straight, but McGarrity's fondness for his characters is evident, as is his love for the harsh but beautiful mountain and desert landscape they inhabit. Readers familiar with the series will be happy to settle back with the chief, his complicated family and the men and women of the department for another enjoyable installment. Major ad/promo; 20-city author tour. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Santa Fe police chief Kevin Kerney stars in the eighth entry (after The Big Gamble) in this popular crime series, set in New Mexico. Kerney is planning to take a few weeks of vacation to spend time with his very pregnant wife, who is on leave from her army duties, and to oversee the building of their new house. A serial killer has different ideas, however, and the events he sets in motion with the murder of a popular defense attorney involve dead pets, ominous messages in blood ("everyone dies"), and increasingly macabre killings that pull the murderer's intricate noose tighter and tighter around Kerney and his family. This tautly woven narrative is not for the faint of heart; as the tension builds, the plot's twists and turns involve some brutal and disturbing scenes. McGarrity's trademark use of the magical New Mexico landscape remains an integral part of the narrative. Highly recommended for most popular fiction collections.-Ann Forister, Roseville P.L., CA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Another impeccable outing from the master of the small-city procedural (The Big Gamble, 2002, etc.) Santa Fe's the small city, Kevin Kerney its estimable police chief, a man of strong convictions, strong feelings-sensitive, yes, but sufficiently draconian when the situation warrants. Now, however, he finds himself stalked by a relentless sociopath bent on vengeance for acts of aggression he chooses not to specify and Kerney can't imagine. The decorated war veteran, famously cool under fire, would never be unduly disturbed by threats aimed solely at him, but his heart does flip-flops when he reads a note that says: "Kerney, can't wait to meet the wife. See you soon." Found near the corpse of a woman horribly murdered, it refers ominously to Sara Brannon Kerney, days away from delivering their child. A horse Kerney lovingly trained is slaughtered; the house owned by Clayton Istee, Kerney's son, is booby-trapped, blown to bits; the hospital where Sarah's confined is scarily penetrated. Corpses pile up, the investigation heats up, but the avenger is not only clever but also well informed about cops and the ways an unwary perpetrator can play into (or a savvy one remain tantalizingly out of) their hands. At length, of course, the Kerneys and their would-be killer meet face-off in a denouement as sudden and violent as it is satisfying. Warning to the fainthearted: Every thirty pages or so your mouth may go dry. Author tour
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451411471
  • Publisher: Onyx
  • Publication date: 8/23/2004
  • Series: Kevin Kerney Series , #8
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 635,341
  • Product dimensions: 6.72 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.95 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael McGarrity
Michael McGarrity is the author of the Anthony Award–nominated Tularosa, as well as Mexican Hat, Serpent Gate, Hermit’s Peak, The Judas Judge, Under the Color of Law, The Big Gamble, Everyone Dies, and Slow Kill. A former deputy sheriff for Santa Fe County, he established the first Sex Crimes Unit. He has also served as an instructor at the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy and as an investigator for the New Mexico Public Defender’s Office.
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Read an Excerpt

1

Jack Potter, perhaps the most successful and best known attorney in Santa Fe, had recently attended a gay rights costume ball dressed as Lady Justice. The following morning a photograph of a smiling Potter, wearing a shimmering frock, a curly wig, and holding the scales of justice and a sword, appeared on the front page of the local paper.

Today Jack Potter wore a tank top, shorts, and a pair of expensive running shoes that looked brand new to Detective Ramona Pino. He was faceup on the sidewalk with a bullet hole in his chest. He'd bled out in front of his office across from the county courthouse early on a warm July morning. From the blood trail on the sidewalk, Pino could tell that Potter had crawled a good fifty feet before turning over on his back to die.

Ramona was more than slightly pissed at the man who'd discovered Potter. Alfonso Allesandro had spotted the body as he passed by in his newspaper truck, and had called the city editor on a cell phone before dialing the cops to report the crime. As a result a photographer had hurried over from the newspaper offices a few blocks away and walked through the blood trail taking pictures before the first officer arrived.

Both men were now waiting in the panel truck under the watchful eye of a uniformed officer while Pino worked the cordoned-off crime scene with the techs, searching for shell casings and anything else that looked like evidence.

Little orange evidence markers were placed at the cigarette butts lying in the gutter, at a broken toothpick found a step away from Potter's body, and next to the small puddle of fairly fresh crankcase oil in the street. One tech dusted the parking meters forfingerprints, and another worked on the door and front porch to Potter's office.

Ramona inspected the small fenced lawn in front of the building looking for any signs that shrubbery and grass had been disturbed or for fibers, threads, or hair that might have been transferred by contact. Finding nothing, she sent a tech who'd finished taking snapshots of the bloody footprints to secure the photographer's shoes so a comparison could be made. The photographer opened the truck door, pulled off his shoes, and shot Ramona a dirty look as he handed them to the tech.

Ramona smiled, but not at the photographer. The newspaper's truck bore an advertising slogan, EVERYONE READS IT, and in black spray paint someone had added:

AND WONDERS WHY

By the time an assistant district attorney, a medical examiner, and Lieutenant Sal Molina showed up, the courthouse was about to open for business. A small crowd of lawyers, clerks, judges, and officers scheduled for court appearances had gathered across the street and were scrutinizing her every move, which made her a little uneasy.

The ME, a roly-poly man with skinny arms showing below a short-sleeved shirt, went off to declare Potter officially dead. Ramona turned her back on the crowd and briefed Molina and the ADA in a low voice.

"Potter was shot in the chest at what appears to be close range," she said. "We have no witnesses to the crime and so far no substantial evidence."

"Was it a drive-by?" Molina asked.

"I don't think so," Ramona replied. "Potter took just one bullet. If the killer had been firing from a moving vehicle, he probably would have emptied his weapon at his target."

"The shooter could have been parked at the curb."

"Possibly," Ramona said. "But if the killer was in a vehicle, I doubt it was a passenger car."

"Why do you say that?" Molina asked.

"The entry and exit wounds don't look that much out of alignment," Ramona answered. "From a car, the shooter would have been firing up at an angle."

Molina nodded in agreement. "Have you found the bullet?"

"No," Pino said as she gazed down the street. At least a dozen buildings would have to be checked for the spent round, including an elementary school, an office building, and a resort hotel two blocks away across a thoroughfare that circled downtown Santa Fe. It would take hours to do the search, probably with no results.

"Maybe we'll get lucky," Molina said, reading Pino's pessimistic expression. She was a pretty young woman with even features and soft brown eyes that often fooled people into thinking she could be easily conned or manipulated.

"What if Potter knew his killer?" Barry Foyt, the ADA, asked.

"That would be great," Molina said. "Otherwise we've got either a random shooting or robbery as the possible motive."

"Was there anything in his pockets?" Foyt asked.

"Just his keys," Ramona answered, showing the key ring in a plastic bag, "and he's still wearing his watch, although it's not an expensive one."

"So maybe we should rule out robbery as a motive as soon as possible," Foyt said, inclining his head toward the single-story adobe building that housed Potter's offices.

"Are you giving permission to search?" Ramona asked.

"Plain view only, for now," Foyt said, "including his car."

"You got it," Ramona said.

"Does he have any employees?" Molina asked, looking at the civilians who had congregated at both ends of the street behind patrol cars blocking the intersections. Uniformed officers stood by their vehicles holding them back.

"He has one secretary," Foyt replied. "I don't see her here yet."

"ID her for us when she shows," Molina said, turning his attention to Pino. "Six detectives are rolling. Let's get the uniforms started identifying onlookers and taking statements. Assign a detective to search Potter's office and put one on his car. Find his wallet. That could help us rule out robbery as a motive. Have the others canvass the neighborhood, and start the techs looking for the bullet."

"Will do, Lieutenant," Ramona said. Even with the additional help, it was going to be a busy day. Once a residential neighborhood, the McKenzie District west of the courthouse was now a mixed-use area of professional offices, private dwellings, apartments in converted houses, several bed-and-breakfast inns, retail specialty shops, and some eateries that were popular with locals. A lot of people would need to be canvassed on the assumption that someone might have noticed a suspicious person, seen a vehicle, or heard the gunshot.

"I wonder if Potter ran every morning before he started work," Molina said.

Foyt shrugged. "I know he liked to run, but I don't know if he kept to a set schedule."

"We'll find out," Ramona said.

"Have you called Chief Kerney?" Molina asked Pino.

"Negative," Ramona answered. "I wanted to secure the crime scene and get an evidence search under way first."

"I'll call him," Molina said, turning to Foyt. "Anything else you want to add, counselor?"

Barry Foyt glanced ruefully at Potter's body. He'd been handling murder cases for the DA's office for the last five years and had been called out to most of the major homicide crime scenes. But this was the first time the victim had been someone he knew and liked.

"Jack was good people," Foyt said brusquely. "Let's get a suspect in custody fast, Lieutenant."

"If only it were that easy," Molina said, thinking maybe he'd been stupid to let Kerney talk him out of putting in his retirement papers. Potter's murder could turn into a real bitch of a controversy real fast if progress on the case stalled.

If he'd been smart, he could have been out on a lake trout fishing without a care in the world, instead of facing the potential indignation of every judge, lawyer, prosecutor, and gay activist in Santa Fe.

Molina scanned the growing crowd before addressing Ramona. "I know you caught the case, Detective, but I'm taking over as primary on this one."

"I understand, Lieutenant," Ramona said.

He sent Pino and Foyt off to brief the detectives who were piling out of unmarked units, flipped open his cell phone to call the chief, and hesitated.

Kerney had picked up his pregnant wife at the Albuquerque airport last night before starting a two-week vacation. Their baby was due any day, and on top of that Kerney was having a new house built on some ranch land he'd bought outside the city.

But the chief's policy was clear: No matter where he was or what he was doing, he was to be informed immediately about every homicide or major felony that occurred within the city limits.

Reluctantly, Molina dialed Kerney's number.

Lt. Colonel Sara Brannon handed the telephone to Kerney and watched his expression change from consternation to vexation as he listened to Sal Molina. She'd just told him that when her maternity leave ended she would start a tour of duty at the Pentagon in a plum strategic planning position that would put her on track for promotion to full colonel. He wasn't at all happy about it.

"What is it?' she said after Kerney hung up.

"Nothing good," Kerney answered. "A lawyer has been shot and killed outside the courthouse."

"You'd better go," Sara said, shifting her weight in the kitchen chair to ease the pain in her back. In the last two weeks being pregnant had become increasingly uncomfortable.

"They can get along without me for a few more minutes," Kerney replied, giving Sara a long, unhappy look across the kitchen table. "I thought you were trying for an assignment closer to home."

"Believe me, I did." As a Military Police Corps officer, Sara wore the insignia of crossed pistols on her uniform. "The only possibility was with the 14th Military Police Brigade at Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri. But there were no slots available at my rank."

Kerney nodded and studied his wife's face. Fast approaching her mid-thirties, Sara was fifteen years his junior. Even with the extra pounds she'd gained during pregnancy, she was lovely to look at. She had strawberry-blond hair, a slender neck, a small line of freckles along the ridge of her nose, sparkling green eyes capable of both warmth and chilling scrutiny, and lips that could smile generously or tighten quickly into firm resolve.

"What about resigning your commission?" Kerney asked. "I recall a conversation we had about that possibility."

"I'm not ready to do that," Sara said. "You knew I was a career officer when you married me."

"Things have changed, we're about to become parents."

"Thanks for the reminder," Sara said forcing a smile and patting her tummy. "I'd totally forgotten."

"We can talk about it later," Kerney said flatly as he got to his feet. Sara's sarcasm annoyed him, but he didn't want to quarrel.

"I thought you had the time," Sara said.

"Not for this discussion," Kerney replied with an abrupt shake of his head.

He left the kitchen and returned wearing a holstered sidearm and his shield clipped to his belt. He gave her a perfunctory kiss on the cheek and went quickly out the door.

Determined not to cry or throw her coffee cup against the wall, Sara decided to draw a warm bath and take a long soak in the tub.

Kerney arrived at the crime scene to find Potter's body covered with a tarp. A large number of onlookers were clustered in the courthouse parking lot watching television reporters broadcast live feeds about the murder to network affiliates in Albuquerque. One reporter started shouting questions at Kerney from across the street.

He ignored the woman and took a quick tour of the evidence markers which, except for the bloody footprints, looked like nothing more than street litter. But if they found a suspect, DNA testing of the cigarette butts that had been marked as evidence might prove valuable.

He bent down and uncovered Potter's body. Jack's handsome, wide-eyed features were frozen in shock, and his bloody hands were pressed against a dark stain on the tank top just below the entry wound in his chest. Potter had died hard.

Jack had started his law career with the district attorney's office a few years before Kerney first joined the police department, and Kerney knew him well, professionally and socially.

After a fairly long stint as an ADA, Potter had opened a private practice specializing in criminal law, quickly becoming one of the most sought-after defense lawyers in the city. When he came out of the closet as an advocate for same-sex marriages some years later, it didn't hurt his reputation in Santa Fe one bit.

Of all the prosecutors Kerney had worked with in the district attorney's office, Jack had been the best of the lot. Outside of the job, he was charming, witty, and fun to be around.

Kerney flipped the tarp over Jack's face and stood. Inside Potter's office he found Sal Molina talking with Larry Otero, his deputy chief and second-in-command. He nodded a curt greeting to both men and turned his attention to Molina. "Fill me in, Sal, if you don't mind repeating yourself."

"Not a problem, Chief," Molina said. "Potter was shot once in the chest at close range. I'm assuming you saw the blood trail on your way in."

"I did," Kerney replied.

"He crawled down the sidewalk and died in front of his office. The ME estimates Potter was shot about fifteen minutes before his body was discovered. We're canvassing the area, but so far we haven't turned up anyone who either witnessed the event or heard the shot."

Kerney glanced around the front office, once the living room of a modest residence. It was nicely appointed with matching Southwestern-style furniture consisting of a large desk, several chairs, a couch, and a coffee table. Two large museum-quality Navajo rugs hung on the walls, and a built-in bookcase held neatly organized state and federal statute books. The door to Potter's inner office was closed.

"Have you ruled out robbery?" Kerney asked.

"Pretty much," Molina replied, "as well as burglary. We've only done a plain-view search so far, but the office and his car appear undisturbed. There are no signs of breaking and entering and the vehicle hasn't been tampered with. Both were locked, and Potter had his keys in his possession when he was shot."

"Also, his wallet containing three hundred dollars and his credit cards is in the bathroom, along with an expensive Swiss wristwatch," Otero said.

"Where's his secretary?" Kerney asked.

"She showed up a few minutes ago," Molina said. "Detective Pino has her over at the courthouse, conducting an interview."

"Is Pino the primary?" Kerney asked.

"No, I am," Molina replied.

"That's what I wanted to hear," Kerney said. "Get the secretary over here soon. Have her double-check to see if anything is missing."

"That's the plan," Molina said.

"What have you learned from her so far?" Kerney asked.

"She says that unless Potter had a court appearance or trial scheduled, he worked abbreviated hours during the summer months," Molina replied. "He'd come in early, go running for a half hour or so, and then shower and change here before starting his day. He usually finished up by mid-afternoon."

"Several neighbors have seen Potter running in the morning, and he keeps a change of clothes in his office closet," Otero said.

"So Potter kept to a daily schedule," Kerney said, "which means this might not be a random shooting."

"That's the way we read it," Molina said.

"Have you contacted Jack's life partner?" Kerney asked. Norman Kaplan, Potter's significant other, owned an upscale antique shop on Canyon Road.

"According to Potter's secretary, he's in London on a buying trip and not due back for three days," Otero said. "I called his hotel, but he's not there. I'll try him again later on."

"Are there any other next of kin?" Kerney asked.

"Not that we know about yet," Otero answered. "But the story is already on the airwaves, thanks to the photographer who showed up before our people arrived on the scene."

"What happened?" Kerney asked.

"He walked through the blood trail, took pictures, and called the newspaper on his cell phone to tell them Potter had been gunned down," Molina explained. "Detective Pino had to order him away from the crime scene."

"Do we have this bozo in hand?" Kerney asked.

"Yeah, he's outside in the panel truck cooling his heels, waiting to give a statement," Otero said. "He's not too happy about it."

"Have a detective take his statement and then arrest him for tampering with evidence and interfering with a criminal investigation," Kerney said.

"Those charges probably won't stick, Chief," Otero said.

"I don't give a damn if they stick or not," Kerney said. "Let the DA sort it out."

Otero eyed Kerney, who was usually levelheaded when it came to dealing with the media. He wondered what was biting the chief. It had to be more than a stupid photographer's mistakes. "Are you sure that's what you want us to do?" he asked.

Kerney bit his lip and shook his head. "You're right. It's a dumb idea. Put a scare into him, instead."

"We can do that," Molina said.

"Get a handle on this fast, Sal," Kerney said. "Let's find someone with a motive-friends, clients, enemies, you know the drill."

Molina nodded.

"I'll talk to the reporters," Otero said.

"Give them the usual spiel, Larry," Kerney said, heading for the door, "and keep me informed. Call me on my cell phone."

The bald-headed man waited inside the courthouse until the cops finished canvassing the onlookers and moved away. Then he joined a cluster of people who were watching TV reporters talk excitedly into microphones with their backs to the crime scene as camera operators got good visuals of Potter's tarp-covered body lying on the sidewalk.

He smiled when a stern-looking Kevin Kerney came out of Potter's office and walked quickly down the street. Several newspaper reporters jogged behind crime scene tape that held them at bay, yelling questions that Kerney waved off.

Soon Kerney would suffer from far more than the unpleasantness of Jack Potter's death. With all that had been put into play, plus what was yet to come, Kerney would quickly realize his world was about to disintegrate. If Kerney proved slow on the uptake, the bald-headed man had devised ways to give him a little nudge or two in the right direction.

He turned on his heel and walked way. It was time to return to his war room and gear up for the next phase of the plan.

—from Everyone Dies by Michael McGarrity, copyright © 2003 Michael McGarrity, published by Dutton, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., all rights reserved, reprinted with permission from the publisher.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Decent read

    I enjoyed this story, maybe because I am from New Mexico, and have been to most of places in the story.

    I like the fact that the author keeps it simple, yet interesting.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2011

    Very suspenseful, highly recommend

    Synopsis: Prominent gay attorney gunned down by an unknown assailant. Second victim with ties to the criminal justice system is found with her throat slit along with a warning EVERYONE DIES. Next on the madman's list: Kerney, his wife, and their unborn son. Just when you think you know what's what, the next victim changes that. The villain is revealed fairly early on, though.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2003

    Edge of the Seat Thriller

    Michael McGarrity continues with his character of Police Chief Kevin Kerney in EVERYONE DIES. This story finds Kerney and wife, Sara, expecting the arrival of their son, Patrick Brannon Kerney at any moment. At a time when everything should be happy and calm, terror and possible death are awaiting the couple instead. It gets so harrowing that Kerney has to deputize his own wife. Set in Santa Fe and having a great Southwestern flavor, it begins with the murder of a gay attorney and is followed by the vicious murder of Kerney¿s favorite mustang. If this is not enough, a parole officer is found with her throat cut and painting missing from her home. But the final straw comes with the complete destruction of the home of Kerney¿s son and attempted murder of him, his wife and two children. The son, Clayton, was conceived with an Apache girl when Kerney was in college and he was never told of the pregnancy. He only recently found out he was a father. Their relationship is wary at best but Clayton comes to learn that maybe the things his mother told him over the years are less that then full truth. These seemingly unrelated murders are all tied together. Only by using the best CSI techniques and good police work will the Santa Fe police, along with the Apache reservation police, find the clues and determine why and finally who is trying to kill the whole Kerney family. With today¿s interest in CSI shows on television, this story is right on target with its descriptions of the use of forensics and modern day police investigation. EVERYONE DIES is written as an ¿edge of the seat¿ thriller that Michael McGarrity is so known for. It is a book about which you will say ¿I can¿t put it down¿ and one you won¿t want to put down until you find out ¿who-dun-it¿.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2003

    Everyone Dies (A Kevin Kerney Novel)

    Michael McGarrity¿s ¿Everyone Dies¿ is an outstanding, intricately plotted police procedural. With his experience at various law enforcement agencies, Mr. McGarrity writes with a most authoritative voice. There is a lot of credibility between the covers. Mr. McGarrity peoples the novel with a host of characters in support of Santa Fe Police Chief Kevin Kerney. The important and continuing ones are fully developed---you truly get to know and care about them. Ultimately this sophisticated tale is one of revenge. A diabolically clever villain from Chief Kerney¿s past is out to kill Kerney---but not before eliminating those Kerney holds dear. Kerney¿s wife and unborn son are among the targets. A massive manhunt with all New Mexico law enforcement organizations involved is mounted. Kerney's reputation for decency, fairness and integrity prevents the usual inter-agency turf battles. You feel the frustration, disappointment and stimulation brought on by the day-to-day info gathering, false leads and cold trails the cops encounter---and the elation felt as the pieces of the puzzle come together. In a wonderful twist, the inventive and resourceful villain shrewdly sets up an unwitting loner to take the fall. It is a brilliant cover up, foiled only by the patsy¿s own extra-legal activities. One of the best reversals I have experienced. New Mexico is an important character in all the Kerney novels. Mr. McGarrity puts you inside the investigation and the Land of Enchantment. An under appreciated author and series. All eight in the Kevin Kerney series are keepers. Do not hesitate to follow this series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2014

    I got Magnetron

    But i may post Mag or Tron mostly

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2014

    Xena & Halo's ¿ Kits ¿

    Salem ~ [Rp'd by me]
    <br> *She* is the runt of the litter. She has a pure white pelt, but it looks dashed with a light grey, hardly noticable. Her two front paws are cloaked in a dark pitch black. Her eyes are a unique deep, mysterious purple, specked with a molten gold.
    <br> Sh has a calm personality. She i mostly defined as adventerous, curious, and iutgoing. But, being the runt, her siblings tease over her, but he hardly pays attention anymore. Her favorite sibling is just the opposite of her, th big boy Magnetron. Small, but she is cunning and has a hot temper, and is just as stubborn as her mom
    <p> Nyx ~ [Open to Rp]
    <br> *He* has a grizzled and kinda crazy light brown, dark brown, golden, maroon pelt. Very stangley enough, he has molten gold colored eyes, and his left ear has a pure white star on it.
    <br> He is very full of himsef and over-confident. Although, he is extremly intelligent and a quick learner, an instant smart killer. He is co<_>cky and never backs down fom a challenge, and certainly can inflict the damage to make the challenger hurt. He teases and taunts salem like none other.
    <p> Hecate ~ [Open to Rp]
    <br> *She* has a bold, flaming ginger pelt, and is complete with a dark grey on each of er paws, like boots. Her tail tip is also a dark ashen grey. Her eyes are a stunning emrald green of cunning.
    <br> She does tease Salem along with Nyx, but not as much, but pretty close. She is not very smart all the time, but she has ruthless and cunning murder know-how, and will not think twice to unseath her claws and show up her skills. She, on the outside, is confident and focused, but, she is in hersef insecure and scared that she will trip up and be teased like Salem is, hence why she teases er sister. To make Salem feel the frightendness she does on the inside.
    <p> Magnetron ~ [ Open for Rp ]
    <br> *He* is the biggest of the litter. He is strong built with square broad shoulders and is naturally musculed. His pelt is a total pitch black, so te shadows hide him in the nght, perfect for assasains. His eyes are a murky dark brown, making him even harder to see in the dark.
    <br> He is almost entirely silent. He doesn't talk often and hardly shows any emotion, for he knows that no emotions makes the perfect killer. He only shows any slim feelings or affection for his smaller sister, Salem. He will talk towards his siblings, but only to defend Salem from Nyx's and Hecate's jeers. He is a natural born thinker, nd is way smarter than he lets on, potentianlly smarter than perfect Nyx.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    action packed police procedural

    Santa Fe Chief of Police Kevin Kerney looks forward to the vacation with his beloved pregnant wife US Army MP LTC Sara Brannon. The couple is at odds over her next assignment at the Pentagon only six weeks after their baby is due. <P>However, their time alone is put on hold when the murdered body of attorney Jack Potter is found on the streets with the crime scene contaminated by a moronic media menace (oxymoron?). Soon others related either by blood or professionally to Kevin are killed with the brazen culprit leaving the message ¿Everyone Dies¿. Kerney and other law enforcement officials in the region put together a massive manhunt seeking to stop a killer who is getting closer and closer to Kevin¿s epicenter, Sara. <P>Though at times this police procedural feels like Cecil DeMille cast the players, fans will appreciate the energy Michael McGarrity imbues in his hero, support players, and New Mexico that turns a serial killer tale into a personal who-done-it for readers rooting for Kevin. The story line is exciting though the death toll rises rather quickly. The investigation is top rate and the family crisis is fully developed and understandable so that the audience receives a solid episode in a strong series. <P>Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2003

    Everyone Dies (A Kevin Kerney Novel)

    Michael McGarrity¿s ¿Everyone Dies¿ is an outstanding, intricately plotted police procedural. With his experience at various law enforcement agencies, Mr. McGarrity writes with a most authoritative voice. There is a lot of credibility between the covers. Mr. McGarrity peoples the novel with a host of characters in support of Santa Fe Police Chief Kevin Kerney. The important and continuing ones are fully developed---you truly get to know and care about them. Ultimately this sophisticated tale is one of revenge. A diabolically clever villain from Chief Kerney¿s past is out to kill Kerney---but not before eliminating those Kerney holds dear. Kerney¿s wife and unborn son are among the targets. A massive manhunt with all New Mexico law enforcement organizations involved is mounted. Kerney reputation for decency, fairness and integrity prevents the usual inter-agency turf battles. You feel the frustration, disappointment and stimulation brought on by the day-to-day info gathering, false leads and cold trails the cops encounter---and the elation felt as the pieces of the puzzle come together. In a wonderful twist, the inventive and resourceful villain shrewdly sets up an unwitting loner to take the fall. It is a brilliant cover up, foiled only by the patsy¿s own extra-legal activities. One of the best reversals I have experienced. New Mexico is an important character in all the Kerney novels. Mr. McGarrity puts you inside the investigation and the Land of Enchantment. An under appreciated author and series. All eight in the Kevin Kerney series are keepers. Do not hesitate to follow this series.

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