Everything I Want to Do Is Illegal: War Stories From the Local Food Front

Everything I Want to Do Is Illegal: War Stories From the Local Food Front

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by Joel Salatin
     
 

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Drawing upon 40 years' experience as an ecological farmer and marketer, Joel Salatin explains with humor and passion why Americans do not have the freedom to choose the food they purchase and eat. From child labor regulations to food inspection, bureaucrats provide themselves sole discretion over what food is available in the local marketplace. Their system favors

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Overview

Drawing upon 40 years' experience as an ecological farmer and marketer, Joel Salatin explains with humor and passion why Americans do not have the freedom to choose the food they purchase and eat. From child labor regulations to food inspection, bureaucrats provide themselves sole discretion over what food is available in the local marketplace. Their system favors industrial, global corporate food systems and discourages community-based food commerce, resulting in homogenized selection, mediocre quality, and exposure to non-organic farming practices. Salatin's expert insight explains why local food is expensive and difficult to find and will illuminate for the reader a deeper understanding of the industrial food complex.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780963810953
Publisher:
Chelsea Green Publishing
Publication date:
09/17/2007
Pages:
338
Sales rank:
326,006
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Joel Salatin and his family own and operate Polyface Farm, arguably the nation's most famous farm since it was profiled in Michael Pollan's New York Times bestseller, The Omnivore's Dilemma and two subsequent documentaries, Food, Inc., and Fresh. An accomplished author and public speaker, Salatin has authored seven books. Recognition for his ecological and local-based farming advocacy includes an honorary doctorate, the Heinz Award, and many leadership awards.

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Everything I Want to Do Is Illegal: War Stories from the Local Food Front 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a grass-fed livestock farmer living near Joel Salatin and have visited his farm and bought his products many times. This book does accurately reflect who Joel is: funny, blunt, knowledgeable 'about some topics', charismatic, certainly a pioneer. However, beware of making assumptions about Joel. The vast majority of his customers and fans are interested in organic foods, have an environmentalist bent, and are politically liberal. They may assume that Joel is like them -- but be assured that he certainly is not. Joel hates all those things. He is a fundamentalist Christian creationist and his politics are somewhere to the right of Dick Cheney. A few examples: He shoots any non-farm animal that comes on his property 'including dogs, rare martens, and birds of prey', and does it with an enthusiasm that is disturbing for a so-called 'poster boy for humane agriculture.' This 'ecological farmer' opposes wilderness areas, endangered species protection, and farmland preservation and would like to see all land privatized to be milked for all its worth in the name of 'property rights.' He compares animal-rights supporters and vegetarians to abortionists. And that's just a few of the chapters! While I agree with a number of his points -- for example, that small-scale farmers should be exempt from regulations designed for corporate agribusinesses like Cargill or Tyson -- his simplistic libertarianism is more appropriate for a college sophomore. Yes, he pioneered pastured poultry and popularized grass-fed farming in general. The number of different profitable enterprises on his farm is remarkable. And anybody who can make a living farming these days should be congratulated. But this book shows him as a generic, naive libertarian wanna-be who has a persecution complex and a far higher opinion of himself than is deserved. I highly recommend his other, more practical, books -- 'Salad Bar Beef' etc -- instead of this angry right-wing rant. Let's hope a more moderate farmer steps up as a spokesman for this critical paradigm shift in agriculture.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is full of great information, but it has a tendency to get long winded often. It is more like a conversation with someone with much experience. I don't feel like he is trying to preach his political views, or convert me.
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