Everything's an Argument / Edition 5

Everything's an Argument / Edition 5

by Andrea A. Lunsford, John J. Ruszkiewicz
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0312538626

ISBN-13: 9780312538620

Pub. Date: 12/23/2009

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

Everything's an Argument's unique, student-centered approach to teaching argument has made it the best-selling brief argument text on the market. The book's engaging, informal style shows students first how to read and analyze a wide range of argumentative texts -- verbal and visual, scholarly and "real world" -- and then how to use what they learn to write their own

Overview

Everything's an Argument's unique, student-centered approach to teaching argument has made it the best-selling brief argument text on the market. The book's engaging, informal style shows students first how to read and analyze a wide range of argumentative texts -- verbal and visual, scholarly and "real world" -- and then how to use what they learn to write their own arguments. Andrea Lunsford and John Ruszkiewicz's instruction is fresh, elegant, and jargon-free, emphasizing inclusivity (moving beyond simple pro/con positions), humor, and visual argument to make Everything's an Argument immediately accessible. Students like this book because it helps them see and understand that a world of argument already surrounds them; instructors like it because it helps students construct their own arguments about that world.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312538620
Publisher:
Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date:
12/23/2009
Edition description:
Fifth Edition
Pages:
656
Product dimensions:
5.68(w) x 8.01(h) x 0.73(d)

Table of Contents


Preface 
Part 1: Reading and Understanding Arguments  

1. Everything Is an Argument  
Why We Make Arguments  
Occasions for Argument  
Kinds of Argument 
STASIS QUESTIONS AT WORK  
Appealing to Audiences  
CULTURAL CONTEXTS FOR ARGUMENT 

2. Arguments Based on Emotion: Pathos
Reading Critically for Pathos
Using Emotions to Build Bridges
Using Emotions to Sustain an Argument
Using Humor
Using Arguments Based on Emotion

3. Arguments Based on Character: Ethos
Thinking Critically About Arguments Based on Character
Establishing Trustworthiness and Credibility
Claiming Authority
Coming Clean about Motives
CULTURAL CONTEXTS FOR ARGUMENT

4. Arguments Based on Facts and Reason: Logos
Thinking Critically About Hard Evidence 
Using Reason and Common Sense
CULTURAL CONTEXTS FOR ARGUMENT
Providing Logical Structures for Argument

5. Fallacies of Argument
Fallacies of Emotional Argument
Fallacies of Ethical Argument
Fallacies of Logical Argument 

6. Rhetorical Analysis
Composing a Rhetorical Analysis
Understanding the Purpose of Arguments You Are Analyzing
Understanding Who Makes an Argument
Identifying and Appealing to Audiences
Examining Arguments Based on Emotion: Pathos
Examining Arguments Based on Character: Ethos
Examining Arguments Based on Facts and Reason: Logos
Examining the Arrangement and Media of Arguments
Looking at Style
Examining a Rhetorical Analysis
     David Brooks, It’s Not about You
     Rachel Kolb, Understanding Brooks’s Binaries (student essay)
GUIDE TO WRITING A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS

Part 2: Writing Arguments

7. Structuring Arguments
The Classical Oration
Rogerian and Invitational Arguments
Toulmin Argument
     Deborah Tannen, Why Is Compromise Now a Dirty Word?
CULTURAL CONTEXTS FOR ARGUMENT

8. Arguments of Fact
Understanding Arguments of Fact
Characterizing Factual Arguments
Developing a Factual Argument
GUIDE TO WRITING AN ARGUMENT OF FACT
Projects
Two Sample Factual Arguments
     Taylor Pearson, Why You Should Fear Your Toaster More Than Nuclear Power (student essay)
     *Neil Irwin, What the Numbers Show about NFL Player Arrests

9. Arguments of Definition
Understanding Arguments of Definition
Kinds of Definition
Developing a Definitional Argument
GUIDE TO WRITING AN ARGUMENT OF DEFINITION
Projects
Two Sample Definitional Arguments
     *Natasha Rodriguez, Who Are You Calling Underprivileged? (student essay)
     *Joyce Xinran Liu, Friending: The Changing Definition of Friendship in the Social Media Era 

10. Evaluations
Understanding Evaluations
Criteria of Evaluation
Characterizing Evaluation
Developing an Evaluative Argument
GUIDE TO WRITING AN EVALUATION
Projects
Two Sample Evaluations
     Sean Kamperman, The Wikipedia Game: Boring, Pointless, or Neither? (student essay)
     *Hayley Tsukayama, My Awkward Week with Google Glass [New]

11. Causal Arguments
Understanding Causal Arguments
Characterizing Causal Arguments
Developing Causal Arguments
GUIDE TO WRITING A CAUSAL ARGUMENT
Projects
Two Sample Causal Arguments

     *Raven Jiang, Dota 2: The Face of Professional Gaming (student essay)
     John Tierney, Can a Playground Be Too Safe?

12. Proposals
Understanding and Categorizing Proposals
Characterizing Proposals
Developing Proposals
GUIDE TO WRITING A PROPOSAL
Projects
Two Sample Proposals
     Manasi Deshpande, A Call to Improve Campus Accessibility  (student essay)
     *Virginia Postrel, Let’s Charge Politicians for Wasting Our Time

Part 3: Style and Presentation in Arguments

13. Style in Arguments
Style and Word Choice
Sentence Structure and Argument
Punctuation and Argument
Special Effects: Figurative Language
CULTURAL CONTEXTS FOR ARGUMENT

14. Visual Rhetoric
The Power of Visual Arguments
Using Visuals in Your Own Arguments

15. Presenting Arguments
Class and Public Discussions
CULTURAL CONTEXTS FOR ARGUMENT
Preparing a Presentation

* 16. Multimedia Arguments
Old Media Transformed by New Media
New Content in New Media
New Audiences in New Media
Analyzing Multimedia Arguments 
Making Multimedia Arguments

Part 4: Research and Arguments

17. Academic Arguments
Understanding What Academic Argument Is
Developing an Academic Argument
Two Sample Academic Arguments
     *Charlotte Geaghan-Breiner, Where the Wild Things Should Be: Healing Nature Deficit 
     Disorder through the Schoolyard
(student essay)
     Lan Xue, China: The Prizes and Pitfalls of Progress

18. Finding Evidence
Considering the Rhetorical Situation
Cultural Contexts for Argument
Using Data and Evidence from Research Sources
SEARCHING ONLINE OR IN DATABASES
Collecting Data on Your Own

19. Evaluating Sources
Assessing Print Sources
Assessing Electronic Sources
Assessing Field Research

20. Using Sources
Practicing Infotention
Building a Critical Mass
Synthesizing Information 

21. Plagiarism and Academic Integrity
Giving Credit
Getting Permission for and Using Copyrighted Internet Sources
Acknowledging Your Sources Accurately and Appropriately
Acknowledging Collaboration

22. Documenting Sources
MLA Style
APA Style
Glossary
Index

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