Evie and Margie

Evie and Margie

by Bernard Waber
     
 

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Evie and Margie are best friends.They do everything together—they even dream together. They dream that one day they will both become famous actresses. So when auditions are held for the school play, they both decide to try out for the lead role of Cinderella. But starring in the school play is one thing they can’t do together, and when Margie is given…  See more details below

Overview


Evie and Margie are best friends.They do everything together—they even dream together. They dream that one day they will both become famous actresses. So when auditions are held for the school play, they both decide to try out for the lead role of Cinderella. But starring in the school play is one thing they can’t do together, and when Margie is given the role, Evie is left to cope with her frustration and jealousy alone.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
PW called this tale of two hippos "an entertaining and subtly edifying portrait of a robust friendship." Ages 4-8. (May) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Best friends have a problem when they both decide to try our for the lead in the class play, Cinderella. Both claim they want the other to get it, but trouble soon arises. In order to cry in the role, Evie tries to think of bad things, but only frightens herself. Margie manages flowing tears and wins the part, with Evie as understudy, and as a tree. Evie realizes that she is jealous of Margie. Still, when Margie is sick and she takes over the role, she is sad about how she feels. Luckily Margie is well enough for the second performance. So both girls get a chance to succeed. After admitting jealousy, both also enjoy celebrating after the show. Although comically exaggerated in lively colored drawings, the emotions and behavior of the girls are very real. The variety of layouts interspersing sequential vignettes of Evie's practicing being a tree and her evil imaginings of Margie's troubles create a visual narrative that adds emotional impact along with a touch of humor to the text. A great story to stir discussion of jealousy between friends. 2003, Walter Lorraine Books/Houghton Mifflin Company, Ages 4 to 8.
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-"Evie and Margie-. did everything together." So begins the story of two hippos with dreams of stardom and of always being best friends. However, there is trouble in paradise when both decide to audition for the lead in Cinderella. "But deep down I'll want you to get it," they reassure one another, and they practice together. After Margie shares her secret to crying on cue (imagine sad events happening), Evie unsuccessfully tries to cry by thinking of things such as not getting her favorite kind of cupcake or her goldfish escaping its bowl. It is no surprise when Margie gets the role (with Evie cast as her understudy and as a tree that whooshes). In the end, the two learn what it means to be a star-and a best friend. The book gets to the heart of what is important to children, and the color illustrations are vintage Waber with great facial expressions and humorous, child-friendly images. Use this title with Lynn Reiser's Best Friends Think Alike (Greenwillow, 1997) and Arnold Lobel's "Frog and Toad" books (HarperCollins) for stellar storyhours on friendship.-Bina Williams, Bridgeport Public Library, CT Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Evie and Margie are best friends; they do everything together, even dreaming of becoming actors. When tryouts for the class play are announced, they both want the lead role of Cinderella. Margie can cry real tears for the crying scene by thinking about bad things, but Evie can't squeeze out one teardrop. She practices until she becomes exasperated, pretending terrible things happen to her parents, dog, and pet fish. At the tryouts, Evie is chosen as Margie's understudy-and a tree in the forest that says, "Whoosh!" Naturally the day of the performance, Margie has a bad cold so Evie gets to be Cinderella and cries real tears because, among other things, jealousy feels so horrible. Waber has given an original twist to the familiar theme of the test of friendship. His typical illustrations feature hippos as the characters, though the girls appear as a cross between Arthur's sister D.W. and the animals. Fans of Lyle might wonder why with tears as the motif, Waber didn't go for the innuendo and make the characters crocodiles? (Picture book. 4-8)
From the Publisher

"...a satisfying, well-plotted picture book..." Booklist, ALA, Starred Review

"Waber has given an original twist to the familiar theme of the test of friendship." Kirkus Reviews

"An entertaining and subtly edifying portrait of a robust friendship." Publishers Weekly

"The book gets to the heart of what is important to children, and the color illustrations are vintage Waber with great facial expressions and humorous, child-friendly images." School Library Journal

"Waber's characters, loosely sketched hippopotami, show their emotions freely, allowing young children to laugh with them without forcing an obvious lesson through mirror images of themselves." Horn Book

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618693382
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
05/08/2006
Edition description:
None
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.31(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.31(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Bernard Waber was the beloved author/illustrator of more than thirty picture books, including Courage, Ira Sleeps Over, and Do You See a Mouse? With the publication of The House on East 88th Street in 1962, his Lyle,  Lyle Crocodile series of books became a mainstay of children's literature. A Literary Landmark plaque commemorating the adventures of this endearing New York City reptile can now be found on East 88th Street and Bernard Waber's artwork is the subject of a traveling retrospective exhibit, curated by the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. You can learn more about him at www.bernardwaber.com.

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