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The Evil Genius
     

The Evil Genius

2.6 3
by Wilkie Collins
 

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Herbert Linley engages in an illicit romantic relationship with his daughter's governess, Sydney Westerfield. Sydney leaves the house after being caught by Herbert's mother-in-law, yet she returns when little kitty falls seriously ill and asks for her beloved governess. As things get more and more complicated, it is Catherine who decides to leave her husband this time

Overview

Herbert Linley engages in an illicit romantic relationship with his daughter's governess, Sydney Westerfield. Sydney leaves the house after being caught by Herbert's mother-in-law, yet she returns when little kitty falls seriously ill and asks for her beloved governess. As things get more and more complicated, it is Catherine who decides to leave her husband this time. She takes her daughter with her and goes into hiding for fear that the child's custody would be given to the father. Later, Catherine divorces Herbert and the narrative describes the daily sufferings of little Kitty who is bereft of both her father and her governess. Captain Bennydeck, a friend of Sydney's dead father, is later introduced in the story. When he comes looking for Sydney, he falls in love with Catherine and only withdraws his proposal to her when he learns that she is a divorced woman. The narrative closes when Sydney, being tormented by her guilty conscience, decides to withdraw from Herbert's life. In the end, Catherine is pushed by Kitty to reunite with her husband and Sydney is hired by Captain Bennydeck as his personal secretary.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Released in 1886, Collins's Victorian soap opera focuses on Kitty Linley, a child whose father dies in disgrace and whose mother abandons her for another marriage. Kitty is tossed into a school where she, of course, is treated brutally. A governess is hired to raise her, but her stepfather falls for the woman, bringing yet more misery into the girl's life. Collins is always popular. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940000749142
Publisher:
B&R Samizdat Express
Publication date:
12/01/2008
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
722 KB

Meet the Author

William Wilkie Collins (1824 - 1889) was an English novelist, playwright and short story writer. His best-known works are The Woman in White (1859), No Name (1862), Armadale (1866) and The Moonstone (1868). The last is considered the first modern English detective novel. Born into the family of painter William Collins in London, he lived with his family in Italy and France as a child and learned French and Italian. After his first novel, Antonina, was published in 1850, he met Charles Dickens, who became a close friend, mentor and collaborator. Some of Collins's works were first published in Dickens' journals All the Year Round and Household Words and the two collaborated on drama and fiction.

Amy Sterling Casil is a 2002 Nebula Award nominee and recipient of other awards and recognition for her short science fiction and fantasy, which has appeared in publications ranging from The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction to Zoetrope. She is the author of 28 nonfiction books, over a hundred short stories, three fiction and poetry collections, and three novels. Amy is a founding member and treasurer of Book View Café and former treasurer of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America, and teaches writing and composition at Saddleback College. She is the founder of Chameleon Publishing.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 8, 1824
Date of Death:
September 23, 1889
Place of Birth:
London, England
Place of Death:
London, England
Education:
Studied law at Lincoln¿s Inn, London

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The Evil Genius. 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book has every possible Victorian cliche from the abandoned, unloved child to the cheating but repentant husband. It is just too melodramatic. There are so many better examples of this genre. It is a title best left to diehard fans of Wilkie Collins.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Vhhgg
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