Evil People: A Comparative Study of Witch Hunts in Swabian Austria and the Electorate of Trier

Overview

Inspired by recent efforts to understand the dynamics of the early modern witch hunt, Johannes Dillinger has produced a powerful synthesis based on careful comparisons. Narrowing his focus to two specific regions—Swabian Austria and the Electorate of Trier—he provides a nuanced explanation of how the tensions between state power and communalism determined the course of witch hunts that claimed over 1,300 lives in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Germany. Dillinger finds that, far from representing the ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (2) from $32.95   
  • New (1) from $90.70   
  • Used (1) from $32.95   

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$32.99
BN.com price
(Save 26%)$45.00 List Price

Overview

Inspired by recent efforts to understand the dynamics of the early modern witch hunt, Johannes Dillinger has produced a powerful synthesis based on careful comparisons. Narrowing his focus to two specific regions—Swabian Austria and the Electorate of Trier—he provides a nuanced explanation of how the tensions between state power and communalism determined the course of witch hunts that claimed over 1,300 lives in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Germany. Dillinger finds that, far from representing the centralizing aggression of emerging early states against local cultures, witch hunts were almost always driven by members of the middling and lower classes in cities and villages, and they were stopped only when early modern states acquired the power to control their localities.

Situating his study in the context of a pervasive magical worldview that embraced both orthodox Christianity and folk belief, Dillinger shows that, in some cases, witch trials themselves were used as magical instruments, designed to avert threats of impending divine wrath. "Evil People" describes a two-century evolution in which witch hunters who liberally bestowed the label "evil people" on others turned into modern images of evil themselves.

In the original German, "Evil People" won the Friedrich Spee Award as an outstanding contribution to the history of witchcraft.

University of Virginia Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Brian Levack
In this groundbreaking comparative study of witch-hunting in two German territories Johannes Dillinger reaches novel conclusions regarding the support of local communities for the trials, the complex web of popular witch beliefs, and the role of centralized princely authority in bringing the trials to an end. The book illuminates the ‘magical world’ of early modern Germany and analyzes the forces that drove the prosecutions.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813928067
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press
  • Publication date: 8/6/2009
  • Series: Studies in Early Modern German History
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Johannes Dillinger is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History at Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, England. Laura Stokes is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Stanford University.

University of Virginia Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction Comparing witch hunts 1

1 "Authority and liberties for the country and the people" : administration, legal and social circumstances 29

2 Golden goblets and cows' hooves : witchcraft and magic 41

3 "If she is not a witch yet, she will certainly become one" : origins and foundations of witchcraft suspicions 74

4 "There goes the werewolf; we thought he had been caught already" : agents of witch hunting and the management of trials 98

5 "Let no one accuse us of negligence" : the influence of the witch hunts in Swabian Austria and the Electorate of Trier on other territories 149

6 "A slippery and obscure business" : the end of the witch hunts 166

Conclusion 193

App Chronology and quantitative analysis of the persecutions 201

Glossary 213

Notes 215

Bibliography 249

Index 291

Read More Show Less

Interviews & Essays

F09

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)