Evita

Evita

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The original Broadway cast recording of Evita, released in September 1979, like the 1976 original studio cast recording from which it was adapted, was a two-LP set containing the entire work; it ran about 100 minutes. This highlights disc, issued 23 years later, does not, as many such abridgments do, simply cull out the most popular songs for a casual audience.

Overview

The original Broadway cast recording of Evita, released in September 1979, like the 1976 original studio cast recording from which it was adapted, was a two-LP set containing the entire work; it ran about 100 minutes. This highlights disc, issued 23 years later, does not, as many such abridgments do, simply cull out the most popular songs for a casual audience. Instead, retaining almost 70 of those original 100 minutes, it pairs away enough material to fit the rest on a single CD but attempts to retain the shape of the piece as a whole. This may have been the simplest way to do it, since the songs are often embedded in suites bridged by a recitative that would have been challenging to edit. Given the approach, the choices about what to keep and what to drop are reasonable. Naturally, the show's best-remembered songs -- "Don't Cry for Me Argentina" (wedded to "On the Balcony of the Casa Rosada") and "Another Suitcase in Another Hall" -- are here, as are several other good songs. Other passages necessary to a minimum explication of the plot have been retained as well. The excisions include some of the choral numbers having to do with the rise of Juan Peron, such as "The Art of the Possible," Evita's "Rainbow Tour" of Europe, and much of the later material depicting her physical decline and death. Patti Lu Pone remains an authoritative Evita, Mandy Patinkin is still a wonderful choice to negotiate the vocal demands of Che, and Bob Gunton, with his Spanish accent, remains a curiosity as Peron. But the purpose of this version of the recording is murky. A better choice would have been to issue a shorter disc containing the show's "greatest hits," as a sticker on this one proclaims, and none of the extra sung-through dialogue.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/05/1996
Label:
Decca U.S.
UPC:
0008811154127
catalogNumber:
11541

Tracks

Disc 1

  1. Cinema in Buenos Aires, 26 July 1952
  2. Requiem for Evita/Oh What a Circus
  3. On This Night of a Thousand Stars/Eva and Magaldi/Eva Beware of the C
  4. Buenos Aires
  5. Goodnight and Thank You
  6. The Lady's Got Potential
  7. Charity Concert/I'd Be Surprisingly Good for You
  8. Another Suitcase in Another Hall
  9. Dangerous Jade
  10. A New Argentina

Disc 2

  1. On the Balcony of the Casa Rosada/Don't Cry for Me Argentina
  2. High Flying, Adored
  3. Rainbow High
  4. Rainbow Tour
  5. The Actress Hasn't Learned the Lines (You'd Like to Hear)
  6. And the Money Kept Rolling (In and Out)
  7. Santa Evita
  8. Waltz for Eva and Che
  9. She Is a Diamond
  10. Dice Are Rolling/Eva's Sonnet
  11. Eva's Final Broadcast
  12. Montage
  13. Lament

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Andrew Lloyd Webber   Keyboards,Performing Ensemble
Mo Foster   Bass
Mike Smith   Vocals,Background Vocals
Ray Russell   Guitar
Julie Covington   Vocals,Track Performer
Barbara Dickson   Vocals
David Hemmings   Background Vocals
Hank Marvin   Guitar
Ann Odell   Keyboards
Simon Phillips   Percussion,Drums
Roy Wood   Background Vocals
Lawrence Walker   Background Vocals
Anthony Bowles   Conductor,Choir Director
Michael d'Abo   Vocals
Alan Doggett   Children's Choirmaster
Jenni Evans   Choir, Chorus
Marc Harris   Choir, Chorus
Jean Hawker   Background Vocals
Neil Hubbard   Guitar
Lorenza Johnson   Choir, Chorus
London Philharmonic Orchestra   Performing Ensemble
Richard Martin   Choir, Chorus
Chris Mercer   Tenor Saxophone
Mike Moran   Keyboards
Joe Moretti   Guitar
Barry Morgan   Percussion,Drums
John Murray   Choir, Chorus
Christopher Neil   Vocals
Brian Odgers   Bass
Lesley Reid   Choir, Chorus
Mike Smith   Vocals
David Snell   Harp
Tony Stevens   Bass
Peter Van Hooke   Percussion,Drums
Terry Wood   Background Vocals
Tim Rice   Background Vocals
David Butler   Choir, Chorus
David Hamilton-Smith   Background Vocals
Perry Nelson   Choir, Chorus
Tony Christie   Vocals
Pete Long   Choir, Chorus
C.T. Wilkinson   Vocals
Christopher Brooks   Choir, Chorus
Richard Knight   Choir, Chorus
Henry McCulloch   Guitar
Barry Abbotts   Choir, Chorus
Demetrius Christopholus   Choir, Chorus
Guy Clapperton   Choir, Chorus
Roy Cullimore   Choir, Chorus
Alex Fodor   Choir, Chorus
Anthony McLoughlin   Choir, Chorus
Boonrat Ngam-Aksorn   Choir, Chorus
Andrew Painter   Choir, Chorus
Andrew Prior   Choir, Chorus
Jeffrey Shankley   Choir, Chorus
Penelope Walmsley-Clark   Choir, Chorus
Myra Sands   Choir, Chorus
Peter Hall   Choir, Chorus
Anna Macleod   Choir, Chorus
Alastair Smith   Choir, Chorus
Jimmy Cassidy   Choir, Chorus
Paul Jones   Vocals,Track Performer
Geoffrey Mitchell   Choir Director
Stephanie de Sykes   Background Vocals
Jean Gilbert   Choir, Chorus

Technical Credits

Andrew Lloyd Webber   Composer,Producer,Orchestration
London Philharmonic Orchestra   Contributor
David Land   Executive Producer
Tim Rice   Lyricist,Producer
David Hamilton-Smith   Engineer
C.T. Wilkinson   Arranger
John Cabalka   Artwork,Illustrations
George Osaki   Art Direction

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Evita 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ah, the “White Evita” – this is not the syrupy ALW of recent days. This is a scathing character study of one of the most fascinating women of the 20th century. In this brilliant concept album, Rice and Webber pull no punches in bringing us a story of dictatorship and demagoguery. Later versions, especially the movie, have been toned down considerably. Material has also been cut out, which has stripped the story of interest and complexity. This Eva Peron is bold and ambitious she doesn’t apologize or ask for our sympathy. Julie Covington plays her with great style. Like Eva herself, Covington’s voice is beautiful, clear and cold as a mountain stream. As her counterpart (Che), Colm Wilkinson brings a much greater depth (his signature) to the role than other portrayals, and also great range from rock to the soaring rendition of “High Flying, Adored”. “Oh What a Circus” and “The Lady’s Got Potential” are such fun! The interposition of Covington’s sweet and insincere “Oh, but it’s sad when a love affair dies” with Wilkinson’s gruff and sarcastic “For God’s sake, get out!” in “Goodnight and Thank You” is brilliant.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have bought this album twice, once in cassette and again in CD. There is so much talent in this album, it is my favorite Rice/Webber production. Also saw the play, like the album better