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Evolutionary Biology
     

Evolutionary Biology

by Max K. Hecht, Bruce Wallace, Ghillean T. Prance
 

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ISBN-10: 0306407752

ISBN-13: 9780306407758

Pub. Date: 10/28/1982

Publisher: Basic Books

The first volume of Evolutionary Biology was published thirteen years ago. Since that time thirteen volumes and one supplement have appeared. As stated in earlier prefaces, we are continuing the focus of this series on critical reviews, commentaries, original papers, and controversies in evolu­ tionary biology. It is our aim to publish papers primarily of greater

Overview

The first volume of Evolutionary Biology was published thirteen years ago. Since that time thirteen volumes and one supplement have appeared. As stated in earlier prefaces, we are continuing the focus of this series on critical reviews, commentaries, original papers, and controversies in evolu­ tionary biology. It is our aim to publish papers primarily of greater length than normally published by society journals and quarterlies. We therefore invite colleagues to submit chapters that fall within the focus and standards of Evolutionary Biology. The editors regretfully announce that Dr. William C. Steere has decided to withdraw from the editorial board of Evolutionary Biology. Dr. Ghillean T. Prance will replace Dr. Steere for forthcoming volumes. Manuscripts should be sent to anyone of the following: Max K. Hecht, Department of Biology, Queens College of the City University of New York, Flushing, New York 11367; Bruce Wallace, Department of Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850; Ghillean T. Prance, New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York 10458. The Editors vii Contents 1. Some Relationships between Density-Independent Selection and Density-Dependent Population Growth Timothy Prout Introduction ............................................ . Part I. The Basic Model: Definitions, Assumptions, and Relationships .................................... 3 Part II. Biological Aspects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . . . . . . Introduction ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . . . . . . . . The Biological Interpretation of the Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . Experimental and Observational Aspects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 . . . . Part III. Census-Stage Theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 . . . . . . . . Introduction ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 . . . . . . . . . . . Two-Point Census ...................................... 23 Three-Point Census: Classical Selection .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 42 . . . Summary of Two-and Three-Point Censuses. . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 . . . Part IV. Summary and Some Implications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 . . . . Summary.............................................. 52 Some Implications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 . . . . . . . . . . Appendix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780306407758
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
10/28/1982
Pages:
458

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

1. Some Relationships between Density-Independent Selection and Density-Dependent Population Growth.- I. The Basic Model: Definitions, Assumptions, and Relationships.- II. Biological Aspects.- The Biological Interpretation of the Model.- Experimental and Observational Aspects.- III. Census-Stage Theory.- Two-Point Census.- Three-Point Census: Classical Selection.- Summary of Two- and Three-Point Censuses.- IV. Summary and Some Implications.- Summary.- Some Implications.- References.- 2. Benefits and Handicaps of Sexual Reproduction.- Intrinsic Cost of Sex.- Individual Selection in Dioecious Outbreeding Populations.- Individual Selection in Dioecious Inbreeding Populations.- Selection between Cosexual and Asexual Individuals.- Selection of Populations.- Functional Handicaps of Sex.- Mating Costs.- Failure to Mate.- Infertility Barriers in Sexual Reproduction.- Stabilization of Superior Genotypes by Asexual Reproduction.- Functional Benefits of Sex.- Ecological Features of Sexual Reproduction.- Developmental Obstacles to Asexual Reproduction.- Male Assistance to Females.- Benefits of Genetically Diverse Offspring.- Gene Recombination in Unpredictable Environments.- Sib Competition.- Randomly Generated Linkage Disequilibrium.- Recruitment of Protective Genes.- Ecological Benefits from Producing Offspring with Alternative Parental Roles.- Niche Differentiation Reduces Competition between the Sexes.- Reduced Competition among Relatives.- Enhanced Occupation of a Patchy Environment.- Reduced Variance of Fitness.- Conclusions.- Summary.- References.- 3. Extrachromosomal Genetic Elements and the Adaptive Evolution of Bacteria.- Antibiotic Resistance: An Example of Bacterial Evolution.- Classes of ECEs.- Options for Genetic Change in Bacteria.- Adaptive Consequences of Extrachromosomal Genetics.- Genetic Novelty Due to “Illegitimate” DNA/DNA Interactions within One Cell.- Genetic Novelty Due to DNA Transfer between Cells.- Further Adaptive Consequences of the Extrachromosomal State.- Integration.- Possible Extension to Higher Organisms?.- References.- 4. A Functional and Evolutionary Interpretation of Brain Size in Vertebrates.- Review of Some Data.- Mammalian Brains.- Brains of Other Vertebrates.- Hypothetical Factors Responsible for Brain Size in Vertebrates.- The Relation of Brain Weight to Body Weight.- Causes of Brain Increase in the Evolution of Birds and Mammals.- Factors Hindering Increase in Brain Size.- The Sources of Conservatism in the Brain Weight/Body Weight Ratio in Lower Vertebrates.- Some Special Cases.- Summary.- References.- 5. Isofemale Strains and Evolutionary Strategies in Natural Populations.- Introduction: Three Approaches to Quantitative Inheritance.- Morphological and Behavioral Traits.- Morphological Traits.- Behavioral Traits.- Ecological Traits.- Physical Traits.- Resource Utilization and Life Histories.- Extreme Stresses.- Ethanol.- CO2 and Anoxia.- Specific Chemical Stresses.- 60Co ?-Irradiation.- Conclusions.- Comparisons among Closely Related Species.- Quantitative Inheritance and Natural Populations.- Genotype and Environment.- A Survey of Traits.- Metabolic Phenotypes.- Summary and Conclusions.- References.- 6. Reproductive Behavior and Mating Success of Male Short-Tailed Crickets: Differences within and between Demes.- The Short-Tailed Cricket.- Demes Studied.- Male Calling Stations.- Types of Calling Stations.- Determinants of Calling Stations.- Survivorship.- Male Calling Times.- Seasons.- Days.- Hours.- Mating Success.- Discussion.- Sexual Selection.- Male Reproductive Behavior.- Epilogue.- References.- 7. The Jamaican Blackbird: A “Natural Experiment” for Hypotheses in Socioecology.- Relationships of Agelaius and Nesopsar.- Alternate Explanations.- Habitat.- Foraging Ecology.- Territoriality and Monogamy.- Parental Care.- Intraspecific Communication.- Socioecology of the Jamaican Blackbird.- “Natural” Experiments.- Summary.- References.

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