EX-Im Bank in the 21st Century: A New Approach?

Overview

President Franklin Roosevelt created the Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im Bank) in 1934 to promote US trade in the midst of the Great Depression. At the outset, the Ex-Im Bank was instructed to supplement, not compete with, private sources of export finance. Historically, the Ex-Im Bank filled gaps when the private sector was reluctant to finance exports to politically uncertain areas ? such as Latin America in the 1940s, Europe in the 1950s, and emerging markets more recently. Critics now ask ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $4.37   
  • New (1) from $46.13   
  • Used (4) from $4.37   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$46.13
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(827)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new and unread! Join our growing list of satisfied customers!

Ships from: Phoenix, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

President Franklin Roosevelt created the Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im Bank) in 1934 to promote US trade in the midst of the Great Depression. At the outset, the Ex-Im Bank was instructed to supplement, not compete with, private sources of export finance. Historically, the Ex-Im Bank filled gaps when the private sector was reluctant to finance exports to politically uncertain areas — such as Latin America in the 1940s, Europe in the 1950s, and emerging markets more recently. Critics now ask whether — in the current era of vast private capital markets — significant financing gaps still exist that require government action. Put bluntly, should the Ex-Im Bank still be playing a role in financing US exports to emerging markets?

Since the 1970s, the Ex-Im Bank has faced a new challenge: helping US exporters meet the financial competition from foreign export credit agencies (ECAs) — such as COFACE in France and the Export-Import Bank of Japan. The Ex-Im Bank has tried to cope with foreign ECAs in two different ways. One way is to negotiate common rules for export financing, under OECD auspices. The other is to match credit terms offered by foreign ECAs. A central question for the Ex-Im Bank in the 21st century is whether this dual strategy still provides a viable answer to an array of new forms of competition spawned by foreign ECAs.

The Institute for International Economics sponsored a conference in May 2000, both to honor the Bank's 65th anniversary and to look ahead at challenges facing the Ex-Im Bank. This volume—edited by former director of the Bank, Rita Rodriguez, and Institute Senior Fellow Gary Clyde Hufbauer—presents the papers from the conference. The papers both describe the Bank's current environment and identify new problems and opportunities in a global economy characterized by highly sophisticated private finance and intense competition for export markets. This volume provides an analytical basis for evaluating the Ex-Im Bank's future and suggests options that should be considered President George W. Bush and Congress.

About the Editors: Gary Clyde Hufbauer, Reginald Jones Senior Fellow, was formerly a Marcus Wallenberg Professor of International Finance Diplomacy at Georgetown University (1985-92); deputy director of the International Law Institute at Georgetown University (1979-81); deputy assistant secretary for international trade and investment policy of the US Treasury (1977-79); and director of the International Tax Staff at the Treasury (1974-76). He has written extensively on international trade, investment, and tax issues. He is coauthor of NAFTA and the Environment: Seven Years Later (2000), Unfinished Business: Telecommunications after the Uruguay Round (1997), Fundamental Tax Reform and Border Tax Adjustments (1996), Western Hemisphere Economic Integration (1994), Measuring the Costs of Protection in the United States (1994), NAFTA: An Assessment (rev. 1993), US Taxation of International Income (1992), North American Free Trade (1992), Economic Sanctions Reconsidered (2nd edition 1990).

Rita M. Rodriguez is former director of the Ex-Im Bank (1982-99) and sat on its board of directors from 1982-99. She was professor of finance at the University of Illinois at Chicago from 1978 to 1982. From 1969 to 1978 she was assistant and associate professor of business administration at Harvard Business School. In addition to her academic career, Rodriguez also served as a consultant in international finance to US multinational companies and to US and foreign government agencies. Rodriguez is the author and coauthor of several books and articles on international finance. She also edited an economic analysis of the Ex-Im Bank that was published at the Bank’s 50th anniversary.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780881323009
  • Publisher: Peterson Institute for International Economics
  • Publication date: 1/28/2001
  • Series: Special Report Series
  • Pages: 286
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.99 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Table of Contents

1. "Ex-Im Bank: Overview, Challenges, and Policy Options"—Rita M. Rodriguez
2. "Ex-Im Bank and International Economic Policy Leadership" —Robert E. Rubin
3. "Perspectives on the Future of Ex-Im Bank" —James A. Harmon
4. "Export Credit Insurance: Business as Usual or a New Approach?"—Lorenz Schomerus
5. "Exports Matter...And So Does Trade Finance"—J. David Richardson
6. "Brazil’s Recent Experience"—Renato Sucupira and Mauricio Mesquita Moreira
7. "Ex-Im, Exports, and Private Capital: Will Financial Markets Squeeze the Ex-Im Bank?"— William R. Cline
8. "International Competition: Conflict and Cooperation in Government Export Financing" —Peter Evans and Kenneth A. Oye
9. "The New World of Government-Supported International Finance" —Allan I. Mendelowitz
10. "Should Ex-Im Bank Be Retired ?" —William Niskanen
11. "A Customer’s Point of View"—Robert L. Nardelli
12. "Can Trade Finance Attract Commercial Banks?" —John Lipsky
13. "ECAs in the Capital Markets"— Daniel Zelikow
14. "An Investment Banker Looks at Ex-Im Bank" —Robert Hormats
15. "A German Perspective" —Hans W. Reich
16. "A Canadian Perspective"—A. Ian Gillespie
17. "A Japanese Perspective"— Fumio Hoshi
18. "Maintaining Ex-Im Bank as a Major Force in the 21st Century"—William M. Daley
19. "A View of Ex-Im from the US Congress" —Jim Leach
20. "The Fight against International Trade Finance Subsidies"—Lawrence H. Summers.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)