Excel 2000 for Windows: Visual QuickStart Guide

Excel 2000 for Windows: Visual QuickStart Guide

by Maria Langer
     
 
Microsoft Excel, the foremost number-crunching application for business and home use, is fully updated as part of the Office 2000 software package. New features include See Through View and List AutoFill, improved formatting, PivotTables, enhanced Web capabilities, and Y2K compatibility. Designed to be seamlessly integrated with other Office 2000 applications,

Overview

Microsoft Excel, the foremost number-crunching application for business and home use, is fully updated as part of the Office 2000 software package. New features include See Through View and List AutoFill, improved formatting, PivotTables, enhanced Web capabilities, and Y2K compatibility. Designed to be seamlessly integrated with other Office 2000 applications, Excel 2000's spreadsheets and graphs will be popping up all over, especially on the Web.

Excel 2000 for Windows: Visual QuickStart Guidewastes no time in showing readers how to get up to speed with Excel 2000. Maria Langer, author of three previous Excel Visual QuickStart Guides, uses screenshots, step-by-step instructions, and clear explanations to guide new users through the basics of Excel and show experienced users the new features of Excel 2000.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Covers using functions in formulas, formatting worksheet cells, adding graphic objects, creating charts, printing, web publishing, setting options, and features new to the latest version of the spreadsheet program. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780201354270
Publisher:
Peachpit Press
Publication date:
04/27/1999
Series:
Visual QuickStart Guide Series
Pages:
261
Product dimensions:
7.02(w) x 8.95(h) x 0.58(d)

Read an Excerpt

Web Publishing

The World Wide Web has had a bigger impact on publishing than any other communication medium introduced in the past fifty years. Web pages, which can include text, graphics, and hyperlinks, can be published on the Internet or an intranet, making them available to audiences 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They can provide information quickly and inexpensively to anyone who needs it.This chapter explains how you can publish and interact with Excel worksheets and charts on the Web. It also tells you how you can include hyperlinks in all of your Excel documents.

TipsThis chapter explains how to create Web pages from Excel documents. Modifying the HTML underlying those pages is beyond the scope of this book. HTML (or HyperText Markup Language) is a system of codes for defining Web pages. To learn more about the World Wide Web, Web publishing, and HTML, check these Peachpit Press books:
The Little Web Book by Alfred and Emily Glossbrenner.
Home Sweet Home Page by Robin Williams.
The Non-Designer's Web Book by Robin Williams and John Tollett.
HTML 4 for the World Wide Web: Visual QuickStart Guide by Elizabeth Castro.
Web pages are normally viewed with a special kind of software called a Web browser. Microsoft Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator are two examples of Web browsers.

To access the Internet, you need an Internet connection, either through an organizational network or dial-up connection. Setting up a connection is beyond the scope of this book; consult the documentation that came with your System or Internet access software for more information.
To publish a Web page, you need access to a Web server. Contact your organization's Network Administrator or your Internet Service Provider (ISP) for more information.Creating Web PagesExcel 2000 has built-in Web publishing features that make it easy to publish Excel data on the Web:
Save Excel documents as standard Web pages (Figure 1). This enables you to publish formatted worksheets and charts on the Web so the information can be shared with others.

Publish Excel documents as interactive Web pages (Figure 2). This enables you to publish spreadsheet solutions on the Web in a format that allows the information to be edited and formatted by others who access it with a Web browser.

Tips
The interactive features of a spreadsheet published on the Web with Excel are only available when the spreadsheet is accessed with Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.01 or later with the Microsoft Office Web Components installed.
When you publish an Excel document as an interactive Web page, some features-such as graphics, text boxes, patterns, and other formatting options-do not appear on the Web.
To save a document as a Web page
1. Open or activate the workbook that you want to save as a Web page (Figure 3).
2. If you want to publish fewer than all sheets in the workbook, select the tabs for the sheets you want to publish.or
If you want to publish only a range of cells in the worksheet, select the cells.
3. Choose File > Save as Web Page (Figure 4) to display a special Save As dialog box (Figure 5).
4. Use the Save in menu and Places Bar buttons in the dialog box to locate and open the folder in which you want to save the Web page.
5. Select a Save option button:
Entire workbook saves all sheets in the workbook as a Web page.
Selection saves only the selection (sheets or cells determined in step 2) as a Web page.
6. To enter a title for the Web page, clic k the Change Title button. Then enter a new title in the Set Page Title dialog box that appears (Figure 6) and click OK.
7. Enter a name for the Web page file in the File name box. Be sure to follow the naming rules required by your Web server.
8. Confirm that Web Page is chosen from the Save as type menu.
9. Click Save.The document (or selected portions of it) is saved as a standard HTML document in the location you specified.

Tips
To see what a workbook file would look like on the Web without actually saving it as a Web page, choose File > Web Page Preview (Figure 4). Excel creates a temporary file for the Web page, runs your default Web browser, and displays the page in the Web browser window (Figure 1).
In step 4, you can click the Web Folders button to open a folder accessible on an intranet or the Internet.
A page title is what appears in the title bar at the top of the Web browser window. It's not the same as the name of the file.
You can get more information about HTML document file naming rules from your organization's Network Administrator or your ISP.
When you save a file as a Web page, Excel creates a folder in the same folder as the page (Figure 7), to store converted graphics that appear on the page. When moving a Web page from one disk location to another in Windows Explorer, it's vital that the Web page and the support files folder be moved together. Otherwise, page components will not appear properly.
To view an Excel document saved as a standard Web page
1. Use your favorite Web browser to open the Web page file (Figure 1).
2. If more than one sheet was saved as part of the Web page, use the tabs at the bottom of the Web page document to switch from one sheet to another (just like in Excel).

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