Exemplary Practices for Beginning Communicators: Implications for AAC / Edition 1

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Overview

This comprehensive text shows professionals how AAC can help establish beginning communication skills among individuals who experience significant communication challenges. Readers will get thoughtful explorations of factors that influence beginning AAC communicators a detailed overview of interventions that help individuals develop crucial communicative behaviors guidelines for selecting an AAC system that best matches an individual's needs enlightening vignettes and examples that bring to life the issues addressed in each chapter With this blend of theoretical discussion and practical strategies, professionals working in the field of AAC can help individuals acquire and expand the skills they need to interact with the world around them.
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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Cynthia R. Weitz, M.A.(Montgomery County Public Schools)
Description: This book provides both an overview of issues involved in providing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) services for beginning communicators as well as in-depth discussions of many of these issues. The information is accessible to the practitioner yet clearly outlines areas in need of greater research.
Purpose: The authors propose to increase our "understanding of how to approach the task of initiating functional strategies that establish beginning communication skills in a timely manner among individuals who are at risk for developing speech comprehension and production skills," particularly through the use of a continuum of AAC strategies. The authors also hope to "stimulate future practice and applied research" in the field. This book fills a gap in the AAC literature by providing comprehensive discussions of topics relevant to this population. The authors meet their objectives admirably.
Audience: The book addresses issues that are relevant and useful to the practitioner, advanced student, and researcher in the field of AAC. Each chapter provides information and discussion that can be applied in practice as well as outlining areas in need of further "experimental scrutiny." The book editors and individual chapter authors are those with knowledge and experience in the field of AAC.
Features: The authors set the tone for the book by focusing the first chapters on clearly defining a beginning communicator, looking at the continuum of communication skills, and then understanding the continuum of AAC skills and the role AAC plays in language intervention. There is in-depth discussion of strategies to establish many of the basic communication functions that we find early on in typically developing individuals, such as requesting and protesting. The authors provide an important discussion on strategies for achieving "socially acceptable escape and avoidance," a critical need for many beginning communicators. Significantly, the book recognizes the importance of providing AAC users the skills needed to go beyond requesting and protesting to achieve social closeness with their communication partners. The authors also provide an important discussion of the use of AAC strategies to enhance the communication of children with severe intelligibility issues. They provide guidelines for the use of a least to most hierarchy of intervention, with speech as the beginning strategy and ending with the use of VOCA. There is discussion of the use of topic and alphabet boards and the role they play in this hierarchy. The authors recognize the need to individualize decision-making and provide several good vignettes to illustrate the use of the information in this area.
Assessment: This book fills an important gap in the AAC literature. It provides not only clearly articulated best practices for practitioners working with and making decisions regarding AAC use for beginning communicators, but points out those areas in need of greater research.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Cynthia R. Weitz, M.A.(Montgomery County Public Schools)
Description: This book provides both an overview of issues involved in providing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) services for beginning communicators as well as in-depth discussions of many of these issues. The information is accessible to the practitioner yet clearly outlines areas in need of greater research.
Purpose: The authors propose to increase our "understanding of how to approach the task of initiating functional strategies that establish beginning communication skills in a timely manner among individuals who are at risk for developing speech comprehension and production skills," particularly through the use of a continuum of AAC strategies. The authors also hope to "stimulate future practice and applied research" in the field. This book fills a gap in the AAC literature by providing comprehensive discussions of topics relevant to this population. The authors meet their objectives admirably.
Audience: The book addresses issues that are relevant and useful to the practitioner, advanced student, and researcher in the field of AAC. Each chapter provides information and discussion that can be applied in practice as well as outlining areas in need of further "experimental scrutiny." The book editors and individual chapter authors are those with knowledge and experience in the field of AAC.
Features: The authors set the tone for the book by focusing the first chapters on clearly defining a beginning communicator, looking at the continuum of communication skills, and then understanding the continuum of AAC skills and the role AAC plays in language intervention. There is in-depth discussion of strategies to establish many of the basic communication functions that we find early on in typically developing individuals, such as requesting and protesting. The authors provide an important discussion on strategies for achieving "socially acceptable escape and avoidance," a critical need for many beginning communicators. Significantly, the book recognizes the importance of providing AAC users the skills needed to go beyond requesting and protesting to achieve social closeness with their communication partners. The authors also provide an important discussion of the use of AAC strategies to enhance the communication of children with severe intelligibility issues. They provide guidelines for the use of a least to most hierarchy of intervention, with speech as the beginning strategy and ending with the use of VOCA. There is discussion of the use of topic and alphabet boards and the role they play in this hierarchy. The authors recognize the need to individualize decision-making and provide several good vignettes to illustrate the use of the information in this area.
Assessment: This book fills an important gap in the AAC literature. It provides not only clearly articulated best practices for practitioners working with and making decisions regarding AAC use for beginning communicators, but points out those areas in need of greater research.

5 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781557665294
  • Publisher: Brookes Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/1/2002
  • Series: Aac Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 528
  • Sales rank: 1,167,289
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

Series Preface
Editorial Advisory Board
About the Editors
About the Contributors
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 A Continuum of AAC Language Intervention Strategies for Beginning Communicators 1
2 Overview of the Emergence of Early AAC Behaviors: Progression from Communicative to Symbolic Skills 25
3 The Importance of Responsivity in Developing Contingent Exchanges with Beginning Communicators 59
4 Replacing Socially Unacceptable Behavior with Acceptable Communication Responses 97
5 Strengthening Communicative Behaviors for Gaining Access to Desired Items and Activities 123
6 Strategies to Achieve Socially Acceptable Escape and Avoidance 157
7 "There's More to Life than Cookies": Developing Interactions for Social Closeness with Beginning Communicators Who Use AAC 187
8 Expanding Children's Early Augmented Behaviors to Support Symbolic Development 219
9 Considerations in Teaching Graphic Symbols to Beginning Communicators 273
10 Breakdowns and Repairs in Conversations Between Beginning AAC Users and Their Partners 323
11 Visual Assessment Considerations for the Design AAC Systems 353
12 Choosing Effective Selection Techniques for Beginning Communicators 395
13 AAC Strategies for Enhancing the Usefulness of Natural Speech in Children with Severe Intelligibility Challenges 433
14 The Role of Language Comprehension in Establishing Early Augmented Conversations 453
Index 475
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