Exercise and It's Mediating Effects on Cognition

Overview

Exercise and Its Mediating Effects on Cognition shows that although many factors contribute to a healthy mind, an active lifestyle provides positive contributions to the cognitive functioning of the aging brain. The text examines how physical activity can indirectly affect cognitive function by influencing mediators—such as sleep quality, nutrition, disease states, anxiety, and depression—that affect physical and mental resources for cognition. This volume also identifies and studies key sources of individual ...

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Overview

Exercise and Its Mediating Effects on Cognition shows that although many factors contribute to a healthy mind, an active lifestyle provides positive contributions to the cognitive functioning of the aging brain. The text examines how physical activity can indirectly affect cognitive function by influencing mediators—such as sleep quality, nutrition, disease states, anxiety, and depression—that affect physical and mental resources for cognition. This volume also identifies and studies key sources of individual variations in exercise and cognitive processes.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Reviewer: David O. Staats, MD (University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center)
Description: This multiauthored book on how exercise mediates cognition in older persons, the second volume in the three volume Aging, Exercise, and Cognition series, is based on a symposium held in Austin, Texas in 2003.
Purpose: The purpose is to review how exercise affects cognition in older persons. The authors and editors meet this goal handsomely.
Audience: The audience here is researchers in brain and aging, exercise physiologists and psychologists working on cognition. The editors believe this book could be used as a text on exercise and cognition.
Features: The first of the book's four parts discusses the models relating exercise to cognition; the second part focuses on exercise and mental functioning; the third discusses exercise's influence on cognition via diet, sleep and aging; and the fourth covers the effects of exercise on chronic diseases and cognition. Each chapter begins with an introduction to the topic and ends with a summary of the discussion that followed in the conference, methodological research problems, and directions for future research. These introductions and summaries are most stimulating.
Assessment: I like this book not only for what it covers, but also for the archetype it represents. The differentiation between mediation and moderation of effects of exercise on cognition is subtle and profound. The laying out of how basic research leads to interventions that lead, in turn, to standards of care is very clearly stated. The archetypal part is the beginning of looking at the indirect manifestations of disease. Exercise helps cognition — why? In part, because it helps the digestion. Exercise helps the bowels open regularly and this makes people bright. Usually one thinks of exercise effects in terms of muscle tone, oxygen consumption, etc., but in older persons, it is this effect of the bowels on cognition that is remarkable (among other things). The proof, of course, is seeing that bed rest of older persons often induces the dreaded fecal impaction, which, in turn, leads to delirium by a variety of mechanisms. Thus, this book is the beginning of the approach to a unified theory of geriatrics and gerontology.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780736057868
  • Publisher: Human Kinetics Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/29/2007
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 296
  • Sales rank: 1,145,638
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Waneen W. Spirduso, EdD, is the Oscar and Anne Mauzy Regents Professor in the department of kinesiology and health education at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin. She was chair of the UT department of kinesiology and health education for 14 years and served as interim dean of the College of Education for 2-1/2 years. Since 1975 her academic interests, research, and presentations have focused on issues central to gerontology and kinesiology, and her research programs have been sponsored by four of the National Institutes of Health and several local foundations.

A widely published author, Dr. Spirduso is also a popular speaker at conferences across the United States. She is the recipient of many honors and awards, including recognition as the Texas Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Scholar in 1986 and the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Scholar (AAHPERD) in 1987. She served two terms as president of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA) and one term as president of the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education (AAKPE).

Dr. Spirduso is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and a member of AAHPERD, ACSM, and AAKPE.

Leonard W. Poon, PhD, is a professor of public health and psychology, chair of the faculty of gerontology, and director of the Gerontology Center at the University of Georgia at Athens. He received his PhD in experimental psychology in 1972 from the University of Denver and has studied aging and cognition for over 30 years with specific emphasis on environmental and lifestyle influences that enhance cognitive functioning in older adults.

A fellow of the American Psychological Association, American Psychological Society, Association of Gerontology in Higher Education, and the Gerontology Society of America, Poon was a Fulbright senior research scholar in Sweden and a senior visiting research scientist to Japan. In 2000, Poon received an honorary doctorate of philosophy from Lund University in Sweden. Among his research awards are the NIA Special Research Award, VA Medical Research Service Achievement Award, North American Leader in Psychogeriatrics, and Southern Gerontological Society Academic Gerontologist Award.

Poon's primary research areas are normal and pathological changes of memory processes in aging, clinical assessment of memory (including assessment of early stages of dementia of the Alzheimer's type), and survival characteristics and adaptation of centenarians. He is currently directing a nine-university, NIA-funded program studying the genetic basis of longevity, relationships between the brain and behavior in Alzheimer's disease, and daily functioning capacities of the oldest old.

Poon currently resides in Athens, Georgia. In his free time he enjoys cycling, photography, and traveling.

Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, PhD, serves as both department head and professor of kinesiology and community health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He served on the World Health Organization Scientific Advisory Committee, which issued guidelines for physical activity in older adults. Chodzko-Zajko chairs the Active Aging Partnership, a national coalition in the area of healthy aging linking the American College of Sports Medicine, the National Institute of Aging, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Geriatrics Society, the National Council on the Aging, the American Association of Retired Persons, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Since 2002, Chodzko-Zajko has served as principal investigator of the National Blueprint Project, a coalition of more than 50 national organizations with a joint commitment to promoting independent, active aging in the 50+ population. He was founding editor of the Journal of Aging and Physical Activity and president of the International Society for Aging and Physical Activity.

He is frequently invited to speak about healthful aging at national and international meetings. Chodzko-Zajko has appeared often on television and radio, including the NBC “Today Show,” National Public Radio, and CNN.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Using Resources and Reserves in an Exercise–Cognition Model
Waneen Spirduso, EdD, Leonard Poon, PhD, and Wojtek Chodzo-Zajko, PhD

Chapter 2. Interrelationships of Exercise, Mediator Variables, and Cognition
Jennifer Etnier, PhD

Chapter 3. Exercise, Depression, and Cognition
John Bartholomew, PhD, and Joseph T. Ciccolo, MA

Chapter 4. Exercise, Stress Effects, and Cognition
Nicole Berchtold, PhD

Chapter 5. Exercise, Self-Efficacy, and Cognition
Edward McAuley, PhD, and Steriani Elavsky, MS

Chapter 6. Cognitive Energetics and Aging
Phillip Tomporowski, PhD

Chapter 7. Exercise and Mental Resources: Methodological Problems
Timothy Salthouse, PhD

Chapter 8. Diet, Motor Behavior, and Cognition
Jim Joseph, PhD

Chapter 9. Exercise and Sleep Quality
Martita Lopez, PhD

Chapter 10. Exercise, Sleep and Cognition: Interactions in Aging
Michael Vitello, PhD

Chapter 11. Exercise, Hypertension, and Cognition
Hiro Tanaka, PhD, and Miriam Cortez-Cooper, PhD

Chapter 12. Exercise, Diabetes, and Cognition
Don Royall, MD

Chapter 13. Exercise, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and Cognition
Charles Emery, PhD

Chapter 14. Conclusions and Future Research Directions
Waneen Spirduso, EdD, Leonard Poon, PhD, and Wojtek Chodzo-Zajko, PhD

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