Exercises for Weather & Climate / Edition 8

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Overview

Considered one of the best hands-on explorations of introductory meteorology concepts, this lab manual’s 17 exercises encourage students to review important ideas and concepts through problem solving, simulations, and guided thinking. The graphics program and online interactive simulations and tutorials help students visualize and master key concepts. It is designed to complement any introductory meteorology or weather and climate text. The Eighth Edition retains Carbone’s acclaimed combination of print labs with robust interactive digital modules, which promote critical thinking through data analysis, problem solving, and experimentation. It is updated throughout with the latest data and examples from the science, and includes many new exercises and new media in a new supporting website, including an entirely new lab on Forecasting. It is at a reduced price when packaged with selected Pearson Science texts.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321769657
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 1/16/2012
  • Edition number: 8
  • Pages: 232
  • Sales rank: 283,554
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Greg Carbone is Professor and Chair of the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. He received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin. He has worked on a number of funded research projects, and his areas of research include climate variability and change, climate impacts, and the use of climate information in the decision making of the water resource community. He regularly teaches introductory and advanced meteorology and climatology courses.
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Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

This lab manual contains exercises for an introductory college-level meteorology course. It combines data analysis, problem solving, and experimentation, with questions designed to encourage critical thinking. The review questions at the end of each chapter are meant to measure comprehension, but more importantly to extend students' thinking about atmospheric processes.

The manual was written to complement either Aguado and Burt's Understanding Weather and Climate, 2d edition or Lutgens and Tarbuck's The Atmosphere, 8th edition. It shares organization, concepts, and graphics with both. However, it should be appropriate for any introductory meteorology laboratory course. I hope that the exercises provide students with a chance to apply what they've learned in lectures or their text. While nearly all questions can be answered from material contained within the manual, a few in each lab will demand that students consider lecture notes or material from their introductory text.

The basic structure of the manual remains the same as previous editions, but revisions have been made to nearly every lab. Labs 10, 11, and 14 have expanded sections on weather map analysis, mid-latitude cyclones, and climatic variability and change respectively. Many new graphics appear in this edition and a majority of old ones have been redrafted. The inclusion of 6 new interactive computer modules marks the most significant change. These modules complement Labs 2, 4, 6, 13, and 14. Questions at the end of each of these labs introduce students to the software, but they are encouraged to ask their own questions and play. As with previouseditions, GeoClock—Joseph Ahlgren's share ware displaying geographical and seasonal variations in sunlight—and an energy balance model written by James E. Burt accompany the manual. Lab 3 requires GeoClock; Labs 5 and 18 require the energy balance model. The CD enclosed at the back of the manual contains all software.

I thank those who contributed to this edition. Mark Anderson, Cecil Keen, Scott Kirsch, John Knox, Scott Robeson, Robert Rohli, Steven Silberberg, and Anthony Vega reviewed the last edition and offered very helpful suggestions. Eric Stevens drafted many of the new figures. Robert Ellis, Xin Kang, and Haiyun Yang assisted with the computer modules. Jim Burt, Bill Kiechle, Cary Mock, Helen Power, Jennifer Rainman, and Donald Yow provided advice, data, and graphics. Mel Grubb took the cover photo and Carol Hall found it for me. Teaching assistants and students from an introductory meteorology course at the University of South Carolina provided helpful critique. Michael Banino, Amanda Griffith, Christine Henry, Dan Kaveney and others at Prentice Hall contributed their expertise throughout the project. Finally, I am indebted to Karen Beidel who gave her time generously, offering extraordinary talents to every aspect of the manual's written and digital form. Without her, there would be no lab manual.

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Table of Contents

1. Vertical Structure of the Atmosphere
2. Earth-Sun Geometry
3. The Surface Energy Budget
4. The Global Energy Budget
5. Atmospheric Moisture
6. Saturation and Atmospheric Stability
7. Cloud Droplets and Raindrops
8. Atmospheric Motion
9. Weather Map Analysis
10. Mid-Latitude Cyclones
11. Forecasting
12. Thunderstorms and Tornadoes(
13. Hurricanes
14. Climate Controls
15. Climate Classification
16. Climatic Variability and Change
17. Simulating Climatic Change

Appendix A: Dimensions and Units
Appendix B: Earth Measures
Appendix C: GeoClock
Appendix D: Weather Symbols

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Preface

PREFACE:

PREFACE

This lab manual contains exercises for an introductory college-level meteorology course. It combines data analysis, problem solving, and experimentation, with questions designed to encourage critical thinking. The review questions at the end of each chapter are meant to measure comprehension, but more importantly to extend students' thinking about atmospheric processes.

The manual was written to complement either Aguado and Burt's Understanding Weather and Climate, 2d edition or Lutgens and Tarbuck's The Atmosphere, 8th edition. It shares organization, concepts, and graphics with both. However, it should be appropriate for any introductory meteorology laboratory course. I hope that the exercises provide students with a chance to apply what they've learned in lectures or their text. While nearly all questions can be answered from material contained within the manual, a few in each lab will demand that students consider lecture notes or material from their introductory text.

The basic structure of the manual remains the same as previous editions, but revisions have been made to nearly every lab. Labs 10, 11, and 14 have expanded sections on weather map analysis, mid-latitude cyclones, and climatic variability and change respectively. Many new graphics appear in this edition and a majority of old ones have been redrafted. The inclusion of 6 new interactive computer modules marks the most significant change. These modules complement Labs 2, 4, 6, 13, and 14. Questions at the end of each of these labs introduce students to the software, but they are encouraged to ask their own questions and play. As withpreviouseditions, GeoClock—Joseph Ahlgren's share ware displaying geographical and seasonal variations in sunlight—and an energy balance model written by James E. Burt accompany the manual. Lab 3 requires GeoClock; Labs 5 and 18 require the energy balance model. The CD enclosed at the back of the manual contains all software.

I thank those who contributed to this edition. Mark Anderson, Cecil Keen, Scott Kirsch, John Knox, Scott Robeson, Robert Rohli, Steven Silberberg, and Anthony Vega reviewed the last edition and offered very helpful suggestions. Eric Stevens drafted many of the new figures. Robert Ellis, Xin Kang, and Haiyun Yang assisted with the computer modules. Jim Burt, Bill Kiechle, Cary Mock, Helen Power, Jennifer Rainman, and Donald Yow provided advice, data, and graphics. Mel Grubb took the cover photo and Carol Hall found it for me. Teaching assistants and students from an introductory meteorology course at the University of South Carolina provided helpful critique. Michael Banino, Amanda Griffith, Christine Henry, Dan Kaveney and others at Prentice Hall contributed their expertise throughout the project. Finally, I am indebted to Karen Beidel who gave her time generously, offering extraordinary talents to every aspect of the manual's written and digital form. Without her, there would be no lab manual.

Read More Show Less

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