Expeditionary Eagles: Outmaneuvering the Taliban

Overview

The NATO contingent hasn't been forced from Afghanistan by Muslim radicals, but by drug runners. The Haqqani Network responsible for many of the highest visibility Kabul attacks is one of the oldest drug cartels in the region. With the supply of heroin on the rise in America and Europe, one has to wonder how much organized-crime lobbying had to do with the final defense strategy. Only with less smuggling of drugs out and ordnance in, can the problem be solved. Both have been broken down into easily concealable ...

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Overview

The NATO contingent hasn't been forced from Afghanistan by Muslim radicals, but by drug runners. The Haqqani Network responsible for many of the highest visibility Kabul attacks is one of the oldest drug cartels in the region. With the supply of heroin on the rise in America and Europe, one has to wonder how much organized-crime lobbying had to do with the final defense strategy. Only with less smuggling of drugs out and ordnance in, can the problem be solved. Both have been broken down into easily concealable "pieces." All traffic along the 14 entrance highways must be better inspected to curtail their movement. Herein lies the most detailed study in existence of Pakistan's drug and militant madrasa networks. Also discussed is how a lone U.S. squad could--without a single artillery round or drone missile--rely on deception to defend a roadside outpost against hundreds of attacking narco-insurgents.

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Editorial Reviews

Leatherneck
'Expeditionary Eagles' is an exciting book, posing new and fruitful ideas about countering the Taliban, and including events as current as June 2010. A longtime student of the Eastern mindset and small-unit tactics, the author has an exceptional background ... for the helpful advice on how to quickly win in Afghanistan.
Aviation Week
'In deference to all good things at Quantico and TRADOC (U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command), doctrine may partially [be] to blame for U.S. squads not keeping pace with tactical innovation worldwide,' Poole writes in his most recent book, 'Expeditionary Eagles: Outmaneuvering the Taliban'.
Military Officer
[E]xciting read about [current] events.... A longtime student of the Eastern mindset and small-unit tactics, its author has the perfect background for some helpful advice on how quickly to win in Afghanistan.
August 2014 - Military Magazine
"[A] wealth of background information ... [on] the cast of characters [in Afghanistan] to include tribes, villages, Pakistan, India, China, and Taliban. This book provides ... insight into Taliban tactics and ... [their] nuances.... Unlike many other commentaries, Poole does a nice job [of] documenting the impact of the heroin industry.... [He] proposes alternative small unit tactics [for U.S. troops].... 'Expeditionary Eagles' is [still] a good way for someone to get up to speed on Afghanistan in a quick and comprehensive way."
Leatherneck
Expeditionary Eagles is an exciting book, posing new and fruitful ideas about countering the Taliban, and including events as current as June 2010. A longtime student of the Eastern mindset and small-unit tactics, the author has an exceptional background, providing a basis for the helpful advice on how to quickly win in Afghanistan.
The Counter Terrorist
If favorable circumstances are to be miraculously created in Afghanistan prior to President Barack Obama's promised July 2011 withdrawal date, soldiers, Marines, and their leaders will have to mine every gem of insight possible from 'Expeditionary Eagles: Outmaneuvering the Taliban'.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780981865928
  • Publisher: Posterity Press
  • Publication date: 7/15/2010
  • Edition description: 74 illustrations
  • Pages: 334
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Through an inverted military career, H. John Poole has discovered a few things that more promotable people miss. After spending his first two years as a combat commander, he did his last seven as an enlisted tactics instructor. That allowed him to see why U.S. troops have always had so much trouble outmaneuvering their immediate adversaries. Their tactical techniques (like football plays) are quite simply outmoded. These U.S. small-unit maneuvers are so unlikely to surprise anyone as to be "premachinegun" in format. This oversight on the part of their commanders and how to compensate for it forms the framework of Poole's work.

Since retirement from the U.S. Marine Corps in 1993, Poole has has traveled extensively in both Communist and Islamist worlds. He has also written 10 other tactics/intelligence supplements and conducted multiday training sessions for 40 U.S. battalions, 9 schools, and 7 special operations units. As most U.S. intelligence personnel know too little about the Eastern thought process and evolution of squad tactics, these supplements provide currently deployed GIs with a rare glimpse into their enemies' intentions. Since 2000, Poole has done research in Russia, Mainland China (twice), North Korea, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Sri Lanka, India (three times), Pakistan (three times), Iran, Lebanon, Turkey, Egypt, Sudan, Tanzania, and Venezuela. Over the course of his lifetime, he has further traveled throughout Asia, Europe, and most of the Western Hemisphere. He has lived (or been stationed) in Mexico, Panama, Vietnam, and Japan. Between early tours in the Marine Corps (from 1969 to 1971), Poole worked as a criminal investigator for the Illinois Bureau of Investigation (IBI). After attending the State Police Academy, he worked out of the IBI's Chicago office.

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Table of Contents

The Afghan War is still salvagable. For America, it has been about denying sanctuary to al-Qaeda. For local factions and governments, a traditional fund raiser—heroin—is more important. Without less smuggling of drugs out and ordnance in, the insurgency will never be dried up. Both have been broken down into more easily concealable "parts." All traffic along the 14 entrance highways must be carefully inspected to curtail their movement. Herein lies the most detailed study in existence of Pakistan's drug and militant madrasa networks. Also discussed is how a lone U.S. squad could—without a single artillery round or drone missile—rely on deception to defend a roadside outpost against hundreds of attacking narco-insurgents.

Read More Show Less

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