Experiencing Spirituality: Finding Meaning Through Storytelling [NOOK Book]

Overview

From the authors of contemporary classic The Spirituality of Imperfection comes this long-awaited sequel.

A great master once said, “The shortest distance between a human being and truth is a story.” In Experiencing Spirituality, Ernest Kurtz and Katherine Ketcham take readers on a journey through storytelling as a means of self-discovery. Recounting and interpreting great wisdom stories from all ages and all cultures, as well as telling many...
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Experiencing Spirituality: Finding Meaning Through Storytelling

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Overview

From the authors of contemporary classic The Spirituality of Imperfection comes this long-awaited sequel.

A great master once said, “The shortest distance between a human being and truth is a story.” In Experiencing Spirituality, Ernest Kurtz and Katherine Ketcham take readers on a journey through storytelling as a means of self-discovery. Recounting and interpreting great wisdom stories from all ages and all cultures, as well as telling many of their own, the authors shed light on such experiences as awe, wonder, humor, confusion, and forgiveness.

In story after story, seekers look to those whose lives reveal a special quality—sometimes called spirituality—and ask the masters what they must do to attain that same quality. The answer is simple: “Come, follow me, and see how I live.” Experiencing Spirituality teaches through the example of human experience.



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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
★ 08/01/2014
In this sequel to The Spirituality of Imperfections (1993), coauthors Kurtz and Ketcham present stories from a variety of countries, cultures, and religions to demonstrate how people attain enlightenment. What's particularly compelling about this work is that the authors use the relevant themes of community, forgiveness, recovery, and so on, and provide simple narratives and readable anecdotes to deliver the message. It's the kind of text in which one can pick an important topic and delve into that chapter, or read the sections randomly. VERDICT One of the best guides for applying spiritual tools to life.
Publishers Weekly
05/26/2014
Kurtz and Ketcham (The Spirituality of Imperfection) return after a long absence with a compendium of stories and wry life truths drawn from a variety of cultures and wisdom traditions. They quite deliberately organize their material loosely by theme, in chapters bearing such titles as "experience," "wonder," "wisdom." But they encourage the reader to dive in at random rather than read in a linear, front-to-back fashion. Readers who are conversant with brief wisdom tales from Hasidism or Zen will find many familiar ones here. What's new, though, is the sourcing and contextualizing found in the unobtrusive footnotes, which demonstrates the breadth and depth of resources the authors have drawn from. The earlier book is the more insightful; some readers may wish for a bit more from two well-known figures than their curation of familiar tales. But this will likely find an enthusiastic reception among people in addiction recovery programs and will be a good addition to public library shelves as well. Agent: Linda Loewenthal, David Black Agency. (May)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101615942
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 5/15/2014
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 315,870
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author




Ernest Kurtz received his Ph.D. in the history of American civilization from Harvard University in 1978. He taught American history and the history of religion in America at the University of Georgia and Loyola University of Chicago.



Katherine Ketcham is the cofounder and executive director of a grassroots nonprofit organization called Trilogy Recovery Community, which helps youth and their family members with alcohol and drug problems.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2014

    Fifteen-some years ago I picked up a copy of ¿The Spirituality o

    Fifteen-some years ago I picked up a copy of “The Spirituality of Imperfection.” Co-authored by Ernest Kurtz and Katherine Ketcham,
     it has been a favorite of mine ever since, a book I return to often for guidance and insight. This new offering, Experiencing Spirituality, 
    Finding Meaning Through Storytelling, by the same team, has now joined the first on my shelf of favorite spiritual reads.

    In this book, in some ways similar to the first, they address spirituality, not directly by talking about it, but through a collection of wisdom stories sewn 
    together with commentary to create a work that communicates the experience of spirituality. The author’s have divided the book into fifteen 
    sections. Each sectionIn this book, in some ways similar to the first, they address spirituality, not directly by talking about it, but through a 
    collection of wisdom stories sewn together with commentary to create a work that communicates the experience of spirituality. The 
    author’s have divided the book into fifteen sections. Each section examines a single idea, such as community, forgiveness, memory, 
    confusion, recovery and so much more.

    This is the kind of book that you can pick up and open to any page for something to contemplate at that moment, or go to a specific topic
    that you wish to explore. The commentary is masterful and enlightening, while allowing the stories to tell the story.

    Five stars and highly recommended reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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