Exploring Exoplanets

Overview

Could there be other planets in the universe similar to those in our solar system? Yes! Scientists have discovered worlds circling distant stars. They call these objects exoplanets. In this book, you'll learn how scientists detect these faraway worlds. As part of the Searchlight Books™ collection, this series explores outer space and sheds light on the question What's Amazing about Space? Fantastic photos, kid-friendly explanations of science concepts, and useful diagrams will ...

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Overview

Could there be other planets in the universe similar to those in our solar system? Yes! Scientists have discovered worlds circling distant stars. They call these objects exoplanets. In this book, you'll learn how scientists detect these faraway worlds. As part of the Searchlight Books™ collection, this series explores outer space and sheds light on the question What's Amazing about Space? Fantastic photos, kid-friendly explanations of science concepts, and useful diagrams will help you discover the answers!

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761354444
  • Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/1/2011
  • Series: What's Amazing about Space? Series
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 1,524,781
  • Age range: 7 - 9 Years
  • Lexile: 650L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Deborah Kops has written more than twenty books for children and young adults. She lives with her husband and son in Greater Boston, and enjoys visiting old historic cities along the Atlantic coast, such as Salem, Massachusetts, and Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Stars and Planets 4

Chapter 2 Types of Exoplanets 9

Chapter 3 Finding Exoplanets 15

Chapter 4 Planet-Hunting Telescopes 23

Chapter 5 The Future Search for Exoplanets 31

Glossary 38

Learn More about Exoplanets 39

Index 40

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 9, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    An exciting look at exoplanets.

    When you peer into the nighttime sky you can often see millions of stars overhead, but you cannot see any planets. The reason you can't see them is because "unlike stars, planets do not give off their own light." Planets, including Earth, are round bodies that orbit stars. Earth, along with seven other planets, travels or orbits around the Sun (which is a star). When we talk about the Sun and its planets we are talking about our solar system. Other planets which orbit around stars in other solar systems are called exoplanets. We cannot see them when we look into the nighttime skies, but astronomers, using powerful telescopes, "have discovered more than five hundred exoplanets" since the 1990s. Astronomers have different names for the different types of exoplanets they have discovered. For example, large ones are called Jupiters and ones that have a close orbit to a star are called Hot Jupiters. Smaller exoplanets, even though they may be larger than our Earth, are called Neptunes. Those that similarly have close orbits like the Hot Jupiters are called Hot Neptunes. In this book you'll get a more detailed explanation of these exoplanets and you'll get to see a visual representation of the Gliese 582 solar system in comparison to ours. You'll also learn how exoplanets are discovered, what astronomers know when they see a star wobble or see light dip, you'll learn about observatories, telescopes, spacecrafts, and the "future search for exoplanets." The beginning nonfiction text and layout of the book make the world of exoplanets easy for the young student to understand. The book is generously illustrated with photographs and artistic renditions that provide visuals for the topic at hand. For example, when the Gaia spacecraft and its mission is being discussed, there are illustrations of the craft and an artistic rendition of a Hot Jupiter and asteroids orbiting a star, a scene the Gaia would try to capture. Captions are factual, adding additional information to the text, but also pose questions for the student to think about. This is a vibrant book that would appeal to a wide range of readers, including reluctant ones. In the back of the book is an index, a glossary, and additional recommended book and website resources to explore. Quill says: This is an exciting look at how astronomers are discovering and studying exoplanets.

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