Exploring the Night Sky: The Equinox Astronomy Guide for Beginners
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Exploring the Night Sky: The Equinox Astronomy Guide for Beginners

by Terence Dickinson, John Bianchi
     
 

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Exploring the Night Sky is aimed at novice star gazers anxious to expand their astronomical repertoire beyond the Big and Little Dippers. Dickinson has designed a superb introduction to astronomy that is clear, concise, beautifully illustrated, and very "user friendly" no matter what the child's age.

Overview

Exploring the Night Sky is aimed at novice star gazers anxious to expand their astronomical repertoire beyond the Big and Little Dippers. Dickinson has designed a superb introduction to astronomy that is clear, concise, beautifully illustrated, and very "user friendly" no matter what the child's age.

Editorial Reviews

Home Education Magazine - Rebecca Rupp
[A] great star-spotting reference.
Belleville Intelligencer - Wendy Rayson-Kerr
Well-illustrated, this book will help you recognize more than just the big dipper while stargazing.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6 ``If starships are ever developed, there will be no shortage of destinations.'' With clarity and enthusiasm, Dickinson presents a look at the high frontier, combining a ``universe in 40 jumps'' sort of tourtaking readers from the Moon (1.3 light-seconds) to the galactic field in general (300 million light-years)with a quick spin about the solar system, adding season-by-season charts of the salient planets, stars, and constellations visible from North America. Dozens of color paintings and some photographs accompany the text, and there is a page of advice on choosing and using binoculars and telescopes. The information is readily available elsewhere, but not so engagingly presented. Thus this is a good additional purchase for heavily-used astronomy collections. John Peters, New York Public Library

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780920656662
Publisher:
Firefly Books, Limited
Publication date:
02/01/1987
Series:
Equinox Children's Science Book Series
Pages:
72
Sales rank:
440,766
Product dimensions:
8.25(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.12(d)
Lexile:
1000L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 18 Years

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Introduction:

The starry night sky has intrigued humans for thousands of years. To our ancestors, the stars and planets were mysterious lights in the darkness above. They could only guess about what was really out there. Gradually, over the centuries, astronomers began to understand what they were seeing. Today, we know the universe contains more galaxies than there are people on Earth. And each galaxy has as many stars as there are grains of sand in an overflowing wheelbarrow. Some of the stars are so enormous that it would take years for spacecraft just to get from one side to the other. Some are no wider than a small city. Our sun is about midway between these extremes.

The sun is a star still in its youth. Stars do not exist forever. Like people, they are born and they die. Astronomers have gathered evidence that the entire universe has not existed forever either. About 15 billion years ago, a majestic explosion called the Big Bang created and expanding bubble of energy. After millions of years, the bubble cooled into gas. Galaxies then began to form from the gas. Later, stars were born within the galaxies. On of those stars was the sun. Astronomers think the sun was born 4 1/2 billion years ago. Earth and the other planets in the solar system were formed along with the sun from leftover material.

That's the big picture, but there are lots of details to be filled in. This book is divided into three sections. The first, a 10-step voyage from the Earth's vicinity to the distant reaches of the universe, sets the stage for part two, "Alien Vistas," a sequence of 10 close-up looks at some of the most interesting objects mentioned in the first section. The final segment is a guide to viewing the night sky, which will enable you to go outside on any clear night of the year and identify celestial objects. Use the glossary at the back of the book for explanations of unfamiliar terms and for pronunciations.

Meet the Author

Terence Dickinson is a prolific science writer specializing in astronomy. More than one million copies of his books are in print. He is the recipient of many national and international science awards, including the New York Academy of Sciences Book of the Year Award and the Royal Canadian Institute's Sandford Fleming Medal. He live near Kingston, Ontario. Dickinson's new edition of Nightwatch has already sold over 75,000 copies.

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