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Extra Innings: Cryonics Brought Him Back to Life. Would He Use This Second Chance to Win His First World Series or to Become a Better Man?
     

Extra Innings: Cryonics Brought Him Back to Life. Would He Use This Second Chance to Win His First World Series or to Become a Better Man?

by Bruce Spitzer
 
In the year 2092, Ted Williams, the greatest baseball hitter of all time, is brought back to life through the science of cryonics.

Once again playing for the Red Sox, Williams finds himself trapped in a world he hardly recognizes: the corruption of the game he loves with über-juiced batters and robot pitchers; difficult love affairs clashing with his old

Overview

In the year 2092, Ted Williams, the greatest baseball hitter of all time, is brought back to life through the science of cryonics.

Once again playing for the Red Sox, Williams finds himself trapped in a world he hardly recognizes: the corruption of the game he loves with über-juiced batters and robot pitchers; difficult love affairs clashing with his old desires; and a military conflict of the future in which he must harness the fighter pilot skills he used in his first life.

Dr. Elizabeth Miles is the cryonicist who brings him back to life, initiating a dramatic sequence of medical achievements. She and her young son Johnnie are a constant reminder of what Williams lacked in his first trip around the bases, never devoting much time to love and family. But old habits die hard.

With enemies and allies both on the field and off, Williams must make sense of it all and play on against a machine that he detests, pressure to take the "giddyup" he abhors, unrelenting media mania, and a dystopian world he can't ignore.

The narrative resonates with the consequences of the major issues we face in our world today-the steroids debate in sports, global warming, corporate greed, technology run rampant, and the moral ambiguity of war.

Extra Innings is alternately poignant and humorous, heartbreaking and joyous. Thought-provoking throughout, it's a rollicking ride that looks at second chances and redemption, the ability to triumph over adversity, and the search for meaning in this life and the next.

Flawed in his first life, Williams must decide in the second what's more important, the chance to win his first World Series, or the chance to be a better man?

The Greatest Comeback of all Time is More Than Just a Game.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A preposterous premise and predictable plot fail to diminish the entertainment value of Spitzer's debut novel, in which Ted Williams (widely acknowledged as the greatest hitter in baseball history) is resurrected via the science of cryonics in the year 2092—nine decades after his real-world death at the age of 83. Dr. Elizabeth Miles reanimates Williams by grafting his preserved, frozen head onto the body of a deceased 25-year-old professional tennis player, and although it takes him several months to adapt to his new surroundings, Williams winds up reliving significant elements of his first life by rejoining his old team, the Boston Red Sox (which now plays at Fenway Island, after global warming generated coastal flooding) and then re-enlisting in the United States Marine Corps to fight the Pakistanis. Along the way, Williams must adjust to a baseball culture in which players legally consume a mixture of steroids known as "the cocktail" and the pitchers are hulking robots. He even manages to fall in love. Spitzer seamlessly mixes fact with fiction, and the future world he imagines isn't too far-fetched. But by attempting to make sweeping statements about everything from performance-enhancing drugs, global warming, and corporate greed to war, morality, and mortality, Spitzer swings for the fences when a triple or even a double would have been good enough.
Boston Magazine
Sheer ballsiness.
Matthew Reed Baker
Sports Illustrated Magazine
In bookstores, readers get a glimpse of a world in which another icon, Ted Williams, lives again. Bruce E. Spitzer's Extra Innings imagines the Kid revived, in 2092, using cryonics. So, what's Williams up to? Batting against "Botwinder" robots and piloting jets in a war.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780984956906
Publisher:
Bear Hill Media
Publication date:
04/28/2012
Pages:
414
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.85(d)

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What People are Saying About This

Bob Lobel
I knew Ted Williams, Ted Williams was a friend of mine—this is Ted Williams. (Bob Lobel, Boston sportscaster who once interviewed Ted Williams, Larry Bird and Bobby Orr together in the same studio)
The Boston Herald
Ted Williams is back on deck thanks to Extra Innings.
Ira Kantor
Ray Kurzweil
Bruce Spitzer has reverse-engineered the brain of Ted Williams, reanimated a great American, and created a novel with memories intact. (Ray Kurzweil, inventor/author/futurist)
Dick Flavin
If you like baseball, science fiction or a good thriller, Extra Innings is the book for you. No need to wait to see if the science of cryonics will bring Ted Williams back. Bruce Spitzer already has. (Dick Flavin, Poet Laureate of the Boston Red Sox, featured with Ted Williams in David Halberstam's best-selling book The Teammates)
Andrew J. Ley
Bruce Spitzer gives Ted Williams a stunning new mission in Extra Innings. The author deserves a special salute, brilliantly imagining Williams' return to the proud tradition of the United States Marine Corps. Semper Fidelis, 'Caveman.' (Col. Andrew J. Ley, USMCR (ret.), F-4 and A-4 driver, and former CO of VMA 322)
Jim Lonborg
Over the years, many people have wondered just how much greater Ted Williams would have been if he were not called away to war, or if he had played in another era. Now, thanks to Bruce Spitzer, we know. (Jim Lonborg, Cy Young Award-winning Red Sox pitcher and member of the 1967 "Dream Team")

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