Extraction [NOOK Book]

Overview

From #1 New York Times bestselling authors Preston & Child, an all-new short story featuring Agent Pendergast, available only as an ebook and audio download.

In New Orleans' French Quarter, the Tooth Fairy isn't a benevolent sprite who slips money under your pillow at night....he's a mysterious old recluse who must be appeased with teeth--lest he extract retribution. ...
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Extraction

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Overview

From #1 New York Times bestselling authors Preston & Child, an all-new short story featuring Agent Pendergast, available only as an ebook and audio download.

In New Orleans' French Quarter, the Tooth Fairy isn't a benevolent sprite who slips money under your pillow at night....he's a mysterious old recluse who must be appeased with teeth--lest he extract retribution. When young Diogenes Pendergast loses a tooth, however, his skeptical older brother Aloysius is determined to put the legend to the test...with dire consequences.

*Includes a special preview chapter of Preston & Child's new full-length novel TWO GRAVES, available December 11, 2012.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781455528080
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/16/2012
  • Series: Special Agent Pendergast Series , #2
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 6,877
  • File size: 611 KB

Meet the Author

Douglas Preston
The thrillers of Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child "stand head and shoulders above their rivals" (Publishers Weekly). Preston and Child's Relic and The Cabinet of Curiosities were chosen by readers in a National Public Radio poll as being among the one hundred greatest thrillers ever written, and Relic was made into a number-one box office hit movie. They are coauthors of the famed Pendergast series and their recent novels include Fever Dream, Cold Vengeance, Two Graves, and Gideon's Corpse. Preston's acclaimed nonfiction book, The Monster of Florence, is being made into a movie starring George Clooney. Lincoln Child is a former book editor who has published five novels of his own, including the huge bestseller Deep Storm.
Readers can sign up for The Pendergast File, a monthly "strangely entertaining note" from the authors, at their website, www.PrestonChild.com. The authors welcome visitors to their alarmingly active Facebook page, where they post regularly.

Biography

Douglas Preston was born in 1956 in Cambridge, MA, was raised in nearby Wellesley (where, by his own admission, he and his brothers were the scourge of the neighborhood!), and graduated from Pomona College in California with a degree in English literature.

Preston's first job was as a writer for the American Museum of Natural History in New York -- an eight year stint that led to the publication of his first book, Dinosaurs in the Attic and introduced him to his future writing partner, Lincoln Child, then working as an editor at St. Martin's Press. The two men bonded, as they worked closely together on the book. As the project neared completion, Preston treated Child to a private midnight tour of the museum, an excursion that proved fateful. As Preston tells it, "...in the darkened Hall of Late Dinosaurs, under a looming T. Rex, Child turned to [me] and said: 'This would make the perfect setting for a thriller!'" Their first collaborative effort, Relic, would not be published until 1995, by which time Preston had picked up stakes and moved to Santa Fe to pursue a full-time writing career.

In addition to writing novels (The Codex, Tyrannosaur Canyon) and nonfiction books on the American Southwest (Cities of Gold, Ribbons of Time), Preston has collaborated with Lincoln Child on several post-Relic thrillers. While not strictly a series, the books share characters and events, and the stories all take place in the same universe. The authors refer to this phenomenon as "The Preston-Child Pangea."

Preston divides his time between New Mexico and Maine, while Child lives in New Jersey -- a situation that necessitates a lot of long-distance communication. But their partnership (facilitated by phone, fax, and email) is remarkably productive and thoroughly egalitarian: They shape their plots through a series of discussions; Child sends an outline of a set of chapters; Preston writes the first draft of those chapters, which is subsequently rewritten by Child; and in this way the novel is edited back and forth until both authors are happy. They attribute the relatively seamless surface of their books to the fact that "[a]ll four hands have found their way into practically every sentence, at one time or another."

In between, Preston remains busy. He is a regular contributor to magazines like National Geographic, The New Yorker, Natural History, Smithsonian, Harper's, and Travel & Leisure, and he continues with varied solo literary projects. Which is not to say his partnership with Lincoln Child is over. Fans of the bestselling Preston-Child thrillers can be assured there are bigger and better adventures to come.

Good To Know

Douglas Preston counts among his ancestors the poet Emily Dickinson, the newspaperman Horace Greeley, and the infamous murderer and opium addict Amasa Greenough.

His brother is Richard Preston, the bestselling author of The Hot Zone, The Cobra Event, The Wild Trees, and other novels and nonfiction narratives.

Preston is an expert horseman and a member of the Long Riders Guild.

He is also a National Geographic Society Fellow, has traveled extensively around the world, and contributes archaeological articles to many magazines.

In our interview, Preston shared some fun and fascinating personal anecdotes.

"My first job was washing dishes in the basement of a nursing home for $2.10 an hour, and I learned as much about the value of hard work there as I ever did later."

"I need to write in a small room -- the smaller the better. I can't write in a big room where someone might sneak up behind my back."

"My hobbies are mountain biking, horseback riding and packing, canoeing and kayaking, hiking, camping, cooking, and skiing."

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 72 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(27)

4 Star

(24)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 72 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 19, 2013

    Short story, no novella

    This is no novella, it is a short story. Twenty pages which are developed well and investigate an incident from Prendergast's childhood having to do with the Bogey-man our parents scared us with in our youth. Interesting, but if I'd known it was a short story I would have saved my money.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 25, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I have enjoyed these authors for years, but this was unsatisfyin

    I have enjoyed these authors for years, but this was unsatisfyingly short (the total page count is inflated by the preview chapter for Two Graves), and, to borrow a phrase from TV Tropes, there are several aspects that make no sense when fridge logic is applied. In other words, it isn't internally consistent. I am still anticipating Two Graves, but if Extraction is any indication, I think they're better at novels than short stories.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Great Short Story

    I love reading about Agent Pendergast, and catching a glimpse into his younger self was great.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2012

    Loved it but...

    ......i wanted more. I cant wait for Two Graves to come out.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2014

    Wow!

    Great, creepy short story. About another kind of Tooth Fairy!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    Pretty good

    Nice story, a bit short, could have been a little more indepth, but love these guys.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 19, 2012

    Poor

    I was disappointed with both Preston and Child and Barnes and Noble. This obviously was just a way to make money.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2012

    Awesome

    Surprise ending. Definitely not what the authors set you up to expect.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2012

    Ripper!

    What a rip! Could have been written by a school child.
    Cubbon

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2012

    Wonderful

    Great short story! Loved every word of it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    highly recommended

    Think of sleepovers and telling scary stories and the chills and thrills you got. This is the story that gave you all that and more. Wonderful story. Thank you

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 18, 2014

    The Best Yet!

    That had to be the most downright creepy novella that I've read in a long time. So very well done...as usual!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2014

    Always a great team

    Creepy but fun read

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 12, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Creepy short story in the Special Agent Pendergast saga. Definitely not one to miss.

    I'm a fan of the Special Agent Pendergast series by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child, so it is always a pleasure to see another foray into the interesting little world of this character. I read a lot of horror books, but only two stories, have ever made me uncomfortable, not in an unpleasant way, but creeped out. This short story was one of those. The other "Still Life With Crows" both struck a chord with me.

    The reasons they struck me this way are because I identified with them on a personal level. In "Still Life With Crows", it was the setting. Growing up in the midwest where cornfields are as common as air, I was easily able to put myself into the characters place and live the story as if I were the main character. In this short story, it's the whole Urban Legend idea. Stories handed down by older kids to younger ones, partially to scare them, but also to keep the stories, and the horrors behind them alive. Tales told by older brothers and passed down through friends and neighbors. We had our share of those while I was growing up, and this novella brought back some of those old memories.

    This really is a great short story, I only wish it had gone a little further.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2013

    Page count is nowhere near 128.  Not even a short story.  Defini

    Page count is nowhere near 128.  Not even a short story.  Definitely not a novella!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 14, 2013

    P&C short

    Pendergast relates a story about the true "tooth fairy" from his childhood. A clever twist and worth the read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 3, 2013

    Too Short

    Disappointingly short, but anything Douglas Preston writes is a fun read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2013

    Good stuff!

    Haunting and creepy- just what you want from these guys!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2013

    No Wonder Is Only 0.99

    This is the most disappointment from Preston & Child! Why did they write an unfinished story?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 10, 2013

    I bought this book but it will not open on my ebook

    I bought this book but it will not open on my ebook

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 72 Customer Reviews

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