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The Extraordinary Adventures of Alfred Kropp (Alfred Kropp Series #1)

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Alfred Kropp was just trying to survive high school when his guardian uncle gets him roped into a suspicious get-rich-quick scheme that changes his life forever: stealing Excalibur—the legendary sword of King Arthur. But after Alfred unwittingly delivers the sword into the hands of a man with enormously evil intentions, he sets off on an unlikely quest to try to right his wrong and save the world from imminent destruction. This gripping, fast-paced, hilarious novel is both a thrilling adventure story and an ...

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The Extraordinary Adventures of Alfred Kropp

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Overview

Alfred Kropp was just trying to survive high school when his guardian uncle gets him roped into a suspicious get-rich-quick scheme that changes his life forever: stealing Excalibur—the legendary sword of King Arthur. But after Alfred unwittingly delivers the sword into the hands of a man with enormously evil intentions, he sets off on an unlikely quest to try to right his wrong and save the world from imminent destruction. This gripping, fast-paced, hilarious novel is both a thrilling adventure story and an engaging account of one boy's coming of age.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
"The newly orphaned, underachieving, utterly endearing narrator of this topsy-turvy novel winds up in an unwitting Arthurian quest," said PW in our Best Books citation. Ages 12-up. (Jan.) Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
It all starts when Alfred Kropp allows himself to be coerced into helping his uncle steal a sword from his employer. Sure, his uncle threatens to give up custody of the teen and send him to a foster home, but that is what will happen, anyway, when the deal goes awry and the person who hired them kills Alfred's uncle right in front of him. Of course, the sword is not just any sword. It is Excalibur, and it has been protected by a special group of knights for centuries. In the wrong hands, it could be used for world domination. Right now, because of Alfred, it is in the wrong hands. The clumsy teen knows he needs to help retrieve the sword and set things right. How exactly he is going to do that is an exciting story, one that involves race cars, helicopters, a pretty girl, and lots of action. Rick Yancey's first young adult novel owes much to the action movie genre. Librarians and parents should be aware that violence is both graphic and plentiful in this book. 2005, Bloomsbury, Ages 13 to 17.
—Heidi Hauser Green
School Library Journal
Gr 6-8-Astonishingly tall 15-year-old Alfred is plunged into a world of adventure, assassination, and Arthurian legend when he agrees to help his uncle filch an ancient sword from the office of a CEO who just happens to be a descendent of the Knights of the Round Table. Of course the sword turns out to be none other than Excalibur, and the guy Alfred swiped it for is Mogart, a knight-gone-bad who hopes to use its magical powers to take over the world. Enter Bennacio, another descendant of the Round Table, who then takes Alfred under his wing on a quest across the Atlantic to rescue the sword from Mogart. The descriptions of minor bits of blood and gore leave much to the imagination and will make Kropp especially appealing to fans of Anthony Horowitz's "Alex Rider" books (Philomel), Geoffrey Huntington's Sorcerers of the Nightwing (ReganBooks, 2002), and even Darren Shan's "The Saga of Darren Shan" series (Little, Brown). True to its action-adventure genre, the story is lighthearted, entertaining, occasionally half-witted, but by and large fun.-Hillias J. Martin, New York Public Library Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Alfred Kropp is an overweight, underachieving teen whose main goals in life consist of getting his learner's permit and dating Amy Pouchard. Things take a very unexpected turn, however, when his uncle talks him into participating in a get-rich-quick scheme. The scheme involves stealing a valuable sword (which just happens to be Excalibur), and before Alfred knows it, he has vowed to protect the powerful sword from the motorcycle-riding, sword-wielding Agents of Darkness. Although he wonders why a group of modern-day knights would entrust him with such an important mission, Alfred enjoys a new-found sense of purpose, which is further fueled by his discovery that he is the last descendent of Lancelot. Yancey has hit one out of the park with this original, engaging and sequel-worthy read. He does a fine job of balancing King Arthur's legend with contemporary action sequences well suited for the silver screen. The expertly paced plot will keep action-adventure fans entertained, and those interested in all things Camelot will get a kick out of watching this funny, self-deprecating teenager save the world. (Fiction. YA)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781599902838
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 5/27/2008
  • Series: Alfred Kropp Series , #1
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 4.24 (w) x 6.86 (h) x 0.79 (d)

Meet the Author

Rick Yancey

Rick Yancey is the author several books for adults, including The Highly Effective Detective (St. Martins, July 06). He is also a produced playwright and former theater critic. This is his first book for young adults. He lives in Gainesville, Florida with his wife and three sons.

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Read an Excerpt

THE EXTRAORDINARY ADVENTURES OF ALFRED KROPP


By RICK YANCEY

BLOOMSBURY

Copyright © 2005 Rick Yancey
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1-58234-693-3


Chapter One

I never thought I would save the world-or die saving it. I never believed in angels or miracles either, and I sure didn't think of myself as a hero. Nobody would have, including you, if you had known me before I took the world's most powerful weapon and let it fall into the hands of a lunatic. Maybe after you hear my story you won't think I'm much of a hero anyway, since most of my heroics (if you want to call them that) resulted from my being a screwup. A lot of people died because of me-including me-but I guess I'm getting ahead of myself and I'd better start from the beginning.

It began with my uncle Farrell wanting to be rich. He never had much money growing up and, by the time Mr. Arthur Myers came along with his once-in-a-lifetime deal, my uncle was forty years old and sick of being poor. Being poor isn't one of those things you get used to, even if being poor is all you've ever been. So when Mr. Myers flashed the cash, all other considerations-like if any of it was legal, for instance-were forgotten. Of course, Uncle Farrell had no way of knowing who Mr. Arthur Myers actually was, or that his name wasn't even Arthur Myers.

But I'm getting ahead of myself again. Maybe I should just start with me.

I was born in Salina, Ohio, the first and last child of Annabelle Kropp. I never knew my dad. He took off before I was born.

Mom's pregnancy was difficult and very long. She was almost ten and a half months along when the doctor decided to get me the heck out of there before I exploded from her stomach like some kind of alien hatchling.

I was born big and just kept getting bigger. At birth, I weighed over twelve pounds and my head was about the size of a watermelon. Okay, maybe not the size of a watermelon, but definitely as big as a cantaloupe-one of those South American cantaloupes, which is a lot bigger than your California variety.

By the time I was five, I weighed over ninety pounds and stood four feet tall. At ten, I hit six feet and two hundred pounds. I was off the pediatrician's growth chart. Mom was pretty worried by that point. She put me on special diets and started me on an exercise program.

Because of my large head, big hands and feet, and my general shyness, a lot of people assumed I was mentally handicapped. Mom must have been worried about that too, because she had my IQ tested. She never told me the results. When I asked her, she said I most definitely was not. "You're just a big boy meant for big things," she said.

I believed her. Not the part about being meant for big things, but the part about me not being retarded, since I never saw my scores and it was one of those things where you have to believe that your parent isn't lying.

We lived in a little apartment near the supermarket where she worked as an assistant manager. Mom never got married, though occasionally a boyfriend came around. She took a second job keeping the books for a couple of mom-and-pop stores. I remember going to bed most nights with the sounds of her calculator snapping in the kitchen.

Then, when I was twelve, she died of cancer.

One morning she had found a tender spot on her left temple. Four months later, she was dead and I was alone.

I spent a couple of years shuttling between foster homes, until Mom's brother, my uncle Farrell, volunteered to take me in, to his place in Knoxville, Tennessee. I had just turned fifteen.

I didn't see much of Uncle Farrell: He worked as a night watchman at an office building in downtown Knoxville and slept most of the day. He wore a black uniform with an embroidered gold shield on the shoulder. He didn't carry a gun, but he did have a nightstick, and he thought he was very important.

I spent a lot of time in my bedroom, listening to music or reading. This bothered Uncle Farrell because he considered himself a man of action, despite the fact that he sat on his butt for eight hours every night doing nothing but staring at surveillance monitors. Finally, he asked me if I wanted to talk about my mom's death. I told him I didn't. I just wanted to be left alone.

"Alfred," he said. "Look around you. Look at the movers and shakers of this world. Do you think they got to be where they are by lying around all day reading books and listening to rap music?"

"I don't know how they got to be where they are," I said. "So I guess they could have."

He didn't like my answer, so he sent me to see the school psychologist, Dr. Francine Peddicott. She was very old and had a very long, sharp nose, and her office smelled like vanilla. Dr. Peddicott liked to ask questions. In fact, I can't remember anything she said that wasn't a question besides "Hello, Alfred," and "Good-bye, Alfred."

"Do you miss your mother?" she asked on my first visit, after asking me if I wanted to sit or lie on the sofa. I chose to sit.

"Sure. She was my mom."

"What do you miss most about her?"

"She was a great cook."

"Really? You miss her cooking the most?"

"Well, I don't know. You asked what I missed most and that's the first thing that popped into my head. Maybe because it's almost dinnertime. Also, Uncle Farrell can't cook. I mean, he cooks, but what he cooks I wouldn't feed to a starving dog. Mostly we have frozen dinners and stuff out of a can."

She scribbled for a minute in her little notebook.

"But your mother-she was a good cook?"

"She was a great cook."

She sighed heavily. Maybe I wasn't giving the kind of answers she was looking for. "Do you hate her sometimes?"

"Hate her for what?"

"Do you hate your mother for dying?"

"Oh, jeez, that wasn't her fault."

"But you get mad at her sometimes, right? For leaving you?"

"I get mad at the cancer for killing her. I get mad at the doctors and ... you know, how it's been around for centuries and we still can't get rid of it. Cancer, I mean. And I think, what if we put all the money we spend on these wasteful government projects toward cancer research. You know, stuff like that."

"What about your father?"

"What about him?"

"Do you hate him?"

"I don't even know him."

"Do you hate him for leaving you and your mom?"

She was making me feel freaky, like she was trying to get me to hate my father, a guy I didn't even know, and even like she was trying to get me to hate my dead mother.

"I guess so, but I don't know all the facts," I said.

"Your mother didn't tell you?"

"She just said he couldn't commit."

"And how does that make you feel?"

"Like he didn't want a kid."

"Like he didn't want-who?"

"Me. Me, I guess. Of course me."

I wondered what the next thing I was supposed to hate was.

"How do you like school?"

"I hate it."

"Why?"

"I don't know anyone."

"You don't have any friends?"

"They call me Frankenstein."

"Who does?"

"Kids at school. You know, because of my size. My big head."

"What about girls?" she asked.

"Girls calling me Frankenstein?"

"Do you have a girlfriend?"

Well, there was this one girl-her name was Amy Pouchard, and she sat two seats over from me in math. She had long blond hair and very dark eyes. One day during my first week, I thought she might have smiled at me. She could have been smiling at the guy on my left, or even not smiling at all, and I just projected a smile onto a nonsmiling face.

"No. No girlfriends," I said.

Uncle Farrell talked to Dr. Peddicott for a long time afterwards. He told me she was referring me to a psychiatrist who could prescribe some antidepressants because Dr. Peddicott believed I was severely depressed and recommended I get involved with something other than TV and music, in addition to seeing a shrink and taking anti-crazy drugs. Uncle Farrell's idea was football, which wasn't too surprising given my size, but football was the last thing I wanted to do.

"Uncle Farrell," I told him, "I don't want to play football."

"You're high-risk, Al," Uncle Farrell answered. "You're running around with all the risk factors for a major psychotic episode. One, you got no dad. Two, you got no mom. Three, you're living with an absentee caretaker-me-and four, you're in a strange town with no friends.

"There was another one too ... Oh, yeah. And five, you're fifteen."

"I want to get my license," I told him.

"Your license for what?"

"For driving. I want my learner's permit."

"I'm telling you that you're about to go off the deep end and you want to talk about getting your learner's permit?"

"That reminded me, the fact that I'm fifteen."

"Dr. Peddicott thought it was a great idea," Uncle Farrell said.

"A learner's permit?"

"No! Going out for the football team. One, you need some kind of activity. Two, it's a great way to build confidence and make friends. And three, look at you! For the love of the Blessed Virgin, you're some kinda force of nature! Any coach would love to have you on his team."

"I don't like football," I said.

"You don't like football? How can you not like football? What kind of kid are you? What kind of American kid doesn't like football? I suppose next you're going to say you want to take dancing lessons!"

"I don't want to take dancing lessons."

"That's good, Al. That's real good. Because if you said you wanted to take dancing lessons, I don't know what I'd do. Throw myself over a cliff or something."

"I don't like pain."

"Ah, come on. They'll bounce off you like-like-pygmies! Gnats! Little pygmy gnats!"

"Uncle Farrell, I cry if I get a splinter. I faint at the sight of blood. And I bruise very easily. I'm a very easy bruiser."

But Uncle Farrell wouldn't take no for an answer. He ended up bribing me. He wouldn't take me to get my learner's permit unless I tried out for the football team. And if I didn't try out for the team, he promised he would put me on so much antidepressant dope, I wouldn't remember to sit when I crapped. Uncle Farrell could be gross like that.

I really wanted my permit-I also didn't want to be so doped up, I couldn't remember how to crap-so I went out for the team.

Chapter Two

I made the team as a second-string right guard, which basically meant I was a practice dummy for the first-string defense.

Coach Harvey was a short round guy with a gut that hung over his pants, and calves about the size of my head, which, as I mentioned, was large. Like a lot of coaches, Coach Harvey liked to scream. He especially liked to scream at me.

One afternoon, about a month before Uncle Farrell struck his deal with the chief Agent of Darkness, I saw how much screaming he could do. I had just let a linebacker blow by me and cream the starting quarterback, the most popular kid in school, Barry Lancaster. I didn't mean for this to happen, but I was having trouble memorizing the playbook. It seemed very complicated, especially seeing it was a document intended for big jocks, most of whom could barely read. Anyway, I thought Barry had called a Dog Right, but actually he had said "Hog Right." That one letter makes a huge difference and left Barry on the turf, writhing in agony.

Coach Harvey charged from the sidelines, silver whistle clamped between his fat lips, screaming around the hysterical screeches of the whistle as he ran.

"Kropp!" Tweet! "Kropp!" Tweet! "KROPP!"

"Sorry, Coach," I told him. "I heard 'dog,' not 'hog.'"

"Dog, not hog?" He turned his head toward Barry, still twisting on the ground. He kept his body turned toward me. "Lancaster! Are you hurt?"

"I'm okay, Coach," Barry gasped. But he didn't look okay to me. His face was as white as the hash marks on the field.

"What play was that, Kropp?" Coach Harvey snapped at me.

"Um, Dog Right?" I said.

"Dog! Dog! You thought hog was dog? How is dog like hog, Kropp? Huh? Tell me!"

The whole team had gathered around us by this point, like gawkers at the scene of a terrible accident.

Coach Harvey reached up and slapped my helmet with the palm of his hand.

"What's the matter with you, boy?" He slapped me again. He proceeded to punctuate his questions with a hard slap against the side of my head.

"Are you stupid?" Slap.

"Are you stupid, Kropp?" Slap. "Are you thick, is that it, Kropp?" Slap-slap.

"No, sir, I'm not."

"No, sir, I'm not what?"

"Stupid, sir."

"Are you sure you're not stupid, Kropp? Because you act stupid. You play stupid. You even talk stupid. So are you absolutely sure, Kropp, that you are not stupid?" Slap-slap-slap.

"No, sir, I know I'm not!"

He slapped me again. I yelled, "My mother had my IQ tested and I'm not stupid! Sir!"

That cracked everybody up, and they kept laughing for the next three weeks. I heard it everywhere-"My mommy had my IQ tested and I'm not stupid!"-and not just in the locker room (where I heard it plenty). It spread over the whole school. Strangers would pass me in the hallway and squeal, "My mommy had my IQ tested!" It was horrible.

That night after the practice, Uncle Farrell asked how it was going.

"I don't want to play football anymore," I said.

"You're playing football, Alfred."

"It's not just about me, Uncle Farrell. Other people can get hurt too."

"You're playing football," he said. "Or you're not getting your license."

"I don't see the point of this," I said. "What's wrong with not playing football? I think it's pretty narrow-minded to assume just because I'm big, I should be playing football."

"Okay, Alfred," he said. "Then you tell me. What do you want to do? You want to go out for the marching band?"

"I don't play an instrument."

"It's a high school band, Alfred, not the New York Philharmonic."

"Still, you probably need to have some kind of basic understanding of music, reading notes, that kind of thing."

"Well, you're not going to lie around in your room all day listening to music and daydreaming. I'm tired of coming up with suggestions, so you tell me: What are your skills? What do you like to do?"

"Lie in my room and listen to music."

"I'm talking about skills, Mr. Wisenheimer, gifts, special attributes-you know, the thing that separates you from the average Joe."

I tried to think of a skill I had. I couldn't.

"Jeez, Al, everybody has something they're good at," Uncle Farrell said.

"What's so wrong about being average? Aren't most people?"

"Is that it? Is that all you expect from yourself, Alfred?" he asked, growing red in the face. I expected him to launch into one of his lectures about the movers and shakers or how anybody could be a success with a little luck and the right mindset.

But he didn't do that. Instead he ordered me into the car and we drove downtown.

"Where are we going?" I asked.

"I'm taking you on a magical journey, Alfred."

"A magical journey? Where to?"

"The future."

We crossed a bridge and I could see a huge glass building towering over everything around it. The glass was dark tinted, and against the night sky it looked like a fat, glittering black thumb pointing up.

"Do you know what that is?" Uncle Farrell asked. "That's where I work, Alfred, Samson Towers. Thirty-three stories high and three city blocks wide. Take a good look at it, Alfred."

"Uncle Farrell, I've seen big buildings before."

He didn't say anything. There was an angry expression on his thin face. Uncle Farrell was forty and as small and scrawny as I was big and meaty, though he had a large head like me. When he put on his security guard uniform, he reminded me of Barney Fife from that old Andy Griffith Show, or rather of a Pez dispenser of Barney Fife, because of the oversized head and skinny body. It made me feel guilty thinking of him as a goofy screwup like Barney Fife, but I couldn't help it. He even had those wet, flappy lips like Barney.

He pulled into the entrance of the underground parking lot and slid a plastic card into a machine. The gate opened and he drove slowly into the nearly empty lot.

"Who owns Samson Towers, Alfred?" he asked.

"A guy named Samson?" I guessed.

"A guy named Bernard Samson," he said. "You don't know anything about him, but let me tell you. Bernard Samson is a self-made millionaire many times over, Alfred. Came to Knoxville at the age of sixteen with nothing in his pockets and now he's one of the richest men in America. You want to know how he got there?"

"He invented the iPod?"

"He worked hard, Alfred. Hard work and something you are sorely lacking in: fortitude, guts, vision, passion. Because let me tell you something, the world doesn't belong to the smartest or the most talented. There are plenty of smart, talented losers in this world. You wanna know who the world belongs to, Alfred?"

"Microsoft?"

(Continues...)



Excerpted from THE EXTRAORDINARY ADVENTURES OF ALFRED KROPP by RICK YANCEY Copyright © 2005 by Rick Yancey. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 62 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(45)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 62 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 15, 2010

    Good reveiw on Alfred Krop

    This is a book review on Alfred Krop. This book is about medieval things and King Arthur. There is some blood and a little bit of language I read the book Alfred Krop. It is normally for the age13 and up. This book is. This is a five star book and I think that is what it deserves.
    The book is mostly about King Arthur's sword witch is the Excalibur. Alfred Krops uncle gets offered to steel the sword for one million dollars. He dies later. Alfred gets sent to a foster home. He meets a lot of kids. He ends up working for an association and finds out his dad is a knight. He ends up getting captured and has to fight his way out. He has help from a lot of people in his association. That is all I can tell you about what happens in the book. Now the setting takes in the medieval times. There are a lot of characters in the book. That is all I can tell you.
    This is mostly about my opinions on this book. This was a very good book and my personal opinion on it is that it is a really good book. It has lots of fighting and weapons. Some of the weapons are swords, guns, and shields. I thank it is mostly good for middle school and high school. That is my opinion on this book.
    This was a good book. I read this in the seventh grade. Like I said this is for the age group 13 and up. There is also some blood and gore in this book. It is practically all action. That is my book review on Alfred Krop.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 19, 2008

    Ty's Book Review

    This is an amazing book. It is full of suspense and will keep you on the edge of your seat the entire time. If you like sword fights, Lamborghini's, and intense fighting scenes then this is the book for you. This book shows how anyone can be a hero. It also shows that everyone is good at something even if they don't know what it may be yet. This was a truly good book. The characters in this book were phenomenal and they had great roles. In this book they even had shooting scenes from car to car. If you don't like interesting fighting scenes then don't waste your time reading this book because it is ACTION PACKED. I am sure I will remember this author because he had great sentence fluency. He never made his sentences unclear, they were always very understandable. I never had to reread sentences over and over to understand them. Rick Yancey also had great adjectives to describe his action packed scenes.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 28, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Cana Rensberger for TeensReadToo.com

    Alfred Kropp is big enough to play football, but too clumsy to be any good, and too dense to remember the playbook. In fact, Alfred doesn't really excel at anything. Except for his height and big head, he's pretty much average. Ordinary. If only he were smaller, he could go through each day unnoticed. <BR/><BR/>He has no father and his mother died of cancer when he was only twelve. For two years he's been juggled between various foster homes until his Uncle Farrell appears and takes him in. And that's when his life becomes anything but ordinary. <BR/><BR/>A slick, devious stranger offers Uncle Farrell one million dollars to steal a special sword back from Mr. Samson, Farrell's boss. Alfred has many questions. How do they know it really belongs to the stranger? What happens to him if his uncle gets caught for stealing? Why is this man asking them to steal it? Uncle Farrell threatens Alfred. He has no choice. He either helps steal the sword, or he goes back to foster care. <BR/><BR/>As soon as Alfred wields the sword in his hands, he knows it is no ordinary sword. He finds out he's holding Excalibur, King Arthur's sword. The same sword that knights have been guarding for centuries. From the moment Alfred steals the sword he is pitched headlong into a world unlike any he has ever known. A world that clashes with knights, swords, fast cars, helicopters, daggers, guns, and much more. <BR/><BR/>Alfred, the ordinary foster kid, finds he has a not-so-ordinary connection to a world forgotten, and through that connection, he has been charged with saving the world by saving Excalibur. An extraordinary task for an ordinary kid. <BR/><BR/>My fourteen year-old son grabbed this book from my shelf before I had a chance to start it and daily badgered me to read it once he'd finished. I will be adding the second and third installments of this series to my library. This action-packed adventure is a must read. I dare you to try to put it down once you've begun. In THE EXTRAORDINARY ADVENTURES OF ALFRED KROPP, Rick Yancey has done the impossible by merging a world of knights in shining armor with today's age of technology, an extraordinary combination! Amazing!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2008

    Outstanding

    The Extraordinary Adventures of Alfred Kropp was excellent. It had a lot of action. It is about this normal but large boy who turns out to help save the world. He also put the world in danger. Alfred and his Uncle Farrell were offered one million dollars to steal a sword that was supposedly Aurther Myers from Samson Towers. One night Alfred and his Uncle Farrell went to Samson Towers. Uncle Farrell works at Samson Towers as a night guard. That's how they got in so easily because Uncle Farrell had the keys. What do you know Alfred and his Uncle got the sword but it took them ten minutes? Then these men in robes with black swords came. They wanted the sword Alfred had. The men in robes put up a good fight but failed. Somehow Alfred fought extremely well and had no idea how he fought the other guys and got away with no sword skills at all. When Alfred and his Uncle got back Aurther the one that gave them one million dollars was at their house and killed Uncle Farrell but spared Alfred. He left Alfred with his dead Uncle. Then Samson came to Alfred¿s house and explained to him about the sword being the most powerful weapon in the world and who Aurther really was. A week later Alfred was living with the Tuttles and didn't like it very much. So every day after school Alfred would wonder around the city. One day while roaming the city Alfred recognized someone in a coffee shop she sat next to him. Bennacio which was the man Alfred recognized said that Samson died and that all of the other Knights died along with Samson. He also said that he was the last Knight. That¿s were Alfred recognized the man. He was one of the guys under the robes at Samson Towers. Bennacio had to leave to recover the sword and Alfred asked if he could come along. Bennacio said why, don¿t you have a family. Alfred said I don¿t have a family all of my family members have passed. So Bennacio said sure you can come along. So Alfred was riding in Mercedes, Ferraris, Jaguars, Police cars, and Lamborghinis. Along the way these dragon warriors which were bad guys on Aurthers team trying to kill them. Then finally Alfred and Bennacio got to where Aurther was hiding and put up a good fight. Bennacio died and Alfred fought and recovered the sword. Killed Aurther and drove all the way back to his home town. The book ended the way it pretty much started. Alfred is living his normal boring life. If you want to pick up the book and read the stuff I left out go ahead because it was a great book.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2008

    Great! I Loved it!

    I'm a 10-year old 6th grader who loves reading. I'm also very choosy with the books I read, so I either really like a book or really can't STAND a book. I think Rick Yancy has real potential as a writer. It was PACKED full of action and had me on the edge of my seat! I reccomend this book to anyone who loves action!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2005

    FINALLY - AMERICA GETS IT'S OWN HARRY POTTER

    Like Alfred, I am a fifteen year old boy. I know what it feels like to not fit in at school. I have dreamed about an adventure like this. I loved every minute of this book. It's like Harry Potter in the USA!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2013

    Awesome

    Its great book and has lots humor

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2013

    Awesome and exciting

    While reading this book, that my freind lent me, i couldn't just stop reading this amazing story. The book , also, reminded of better times despite the dangers

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2012

    Excellent

    I couldnt put the book down once I started! I recommend reading it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    Amazing

    Awesome book.new favorite

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2012

    Great

    This book is great u should read it to

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 29, 2011

    An amazing book

    Ask anyone at school. Alfred Kropp is a fat loser. But when Al accidently gives the most powerful weapon in the universe to a pshyco, he has to fix his mistake by becoming something no one thought he could be - a hero. A very good book. I love the funny parts too. Especially Al's Uncle Farrell. Good book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 22, 2011

    Extraordinary

    Rick Yancey with paramount detail elucidates the breathtaking adventure of an unlikely hero that rises to slaughter the means of evil! Alfred Kropp achieves to take us inside his unforgettable experience that will leave us anxious and desperate for more that is yet to come. I as a reader strongly recommend this novel to all those people looking for more than just an adventure. People looking for more than just the extraordinary. People looking for the one and only Alfred Kropp. I enjoyed this book to the fullest picturing the destructive assassins, gallant knights, malignant fights and..... yes of course, the Ferrari Enzo! So come and join the thousands of people who didn't stay at the ordinary and lunged for the EXTRAordinary! Note: For all those thousands of people who lunged for the extraordinary don't stay there! Charge for the 'extra' extraordinary and read more books by the notable Rick Yancy I

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 23, 2011

    so awesome!!!!!

    full of intense action and funny parts 2

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 2, 2011

    Awsome!!!!!!!!

    I am 12 and read this book in a class. I got a nook and git it for my nook. I think its the best book ever. The fightingbis so intense. I would reccomend to anyone who loves adventure or is just looking for an awsome read. Plus the price is awsome

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2011

    great book. it rocks

    OMG READ THIS BOOK IT ROCKS

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 5, 2011

    This Book Is Awesome!

    The title says it all

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2014

    H

    One of the best books i have read and i recemend it to anyone who wants a good book to read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    Great book

    Awesome book that kept me entertained to the end!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2013

    Awesome book

    I read this book and i think u should read it too.
    Great book

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